Homeostasis

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Notes from Grade 11 bio class on homeostasis

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  • Homeostasis

    1. 1. Sir Charles Blagden What are effects of extreme heat on the body? How do we resist heat? See the video
    2. 2. Thermoregulation
    3. 3. Thermoregulation Too hot
    4. 4. Thermoregulation Too hot cc licensed flickr photo by Finizio: http://flickr.com/photos/finizio/492955038/
    5. 5. Thermoregulation Too hot Too cool cc licensed flickr photo by Finizio: http://flickr.com/photos/finizio/492955038/
    6. 6. Thermoregulation Too hot cc licensed flickr photo by MaryLane: http://flickr.com/photos/marylane/520905761/ Too cool cc licensed flickr photo by Finizio: http://flickr.com/photos/finizio/492955038/
    7. 7. Homeostasis of house temperature cc licensed flickr photo by rustybrick: http://flickr.com/photos/rustybrick/2151548025/ cc licensed flickr photo by slworking2: http://flickr.com/photos/slworking/394991055
    8. 8. Homeostasis of house temperature cc licensed flickr photo by rustybrick: http://flickr.com/photos/rustybrick/2151548025/ cc licensed flickr photo by slworking2: http://flickr.com/photos/slworking/394991055
    9. 9. Homeostasis of house temperature Too cold cc licensed flickr photo by rustybrick: http://flickr.com/photos/rustybrick/2151548025/ cc licensed flickr photo by slworking2: http://flickr.com/photos/slworking/394991055
    10. 10. Homeostasis of house temperature Too cold cc licensed flickr photo by rustybrick: http://flickr.com/photos/rustybrick/2151548025/ cc licensed flickr photo by slworking2: http://flickr.com/photos/slworking/394991055 cc licensed flickr photo by Xystance: http://flickr.com/photos/xystance/4278997785/
    11. 11. Homeostasis of house temperature Too cold Too hot cc licensed flickr photo by rustybrick: http://flickr.com/photos/rustybrick/2151548025/ cc licensed flickr photo by slworking2: http://flickr.com/photos/slworking/394991055 cc licensed flickr photo by Xystance: http://flickr.com/photos/xystance/4278997785/
    12. 12. Homeostasis of house temperature Too cold Too hot cc licensed flickr photo by rustybrick: http://flickr.com/photos/rustybrick/2151548025/ cc licensed flickr photo by slworking2: http://flickr.com/photos/slworking/394991055 cc licensed flickr photo by Xystance: http://flickr.com/photos/xystance/4278997785/
    13. 13. Homeostasis of house temperature Too cold Too hot cc licensed flickr photo by rustybrick: http://flickr.com/photos/rustybrick/2151548025/ return temp to normal range cc licensed flickr photo by slworking2: http://flickr.com/photos/slworking/394991055 cc licensed flickr photo by Xystance: http://flickr.com/photos/xystance/4278997785/
    14. 14. Thermoregulation is an example of homeostasis def’n - the property of a system that regulates its internal environment and tends to maintain a stable, constant condition despite changing external conditions
    15. 15. Thermoregulation is an example of homeostasis def’n - the property of a system that regulates its internal environment and tends to maintain a stable, constant condition despite changing external conditions All living things exhibit homeostasis!
    16. 16. Homeostatic systems require: a receptor - monitors and responds to changes in the system a control center - sets the range for the condition an effector - produce an action which moves the system back into the desired range feedback - the results of the effector are detected by the receptors
    17. 17. Thermoregulation Receptors Blood temperature is monitored by the hypothalmus.
    18. 18. Thermoregulation Receptors Blood temperature is monitored by cc licensed flickr photo by Andres Rueda: http:// the hypothalmus. flickr.com/photos/andresrueda/3407340937/
    19. 19. Thermoregulation Receptors Blood temperature is monitored by cc licensed flickr photo by Andres Rueda: http:// the hypothalmus. flickr.com/photos/andresrueda/3407340937/ http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Primary_central_nervous_system_B- cell_non-Hodgkin_lymphoma.jpg
    20. 20. Thermoregulation Receptors Blood temperature is monitored by cc licensed flickr photo by Andres Rueda: http:// the hypothalmus. flickr.com/photos/andresrueda/3407340937/ http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Primary_central_nervous_system_B- cell_non-Hodgkin_lymphoma.jpg
    21. 21. Thermoregulation Receptors External temperature is measured by receptors in the skin
    22. 22. Thermoregulation Effectors if too hot Sweat Dilation of blood vessels in skin, allowing blood to flow to surface. Heat from the cc licensed flickr photo by RLHyde: http://flickr.com/photos/breatheindigital/ 4668093768/ blood can be lost through the surface of the skin.
    23. 23. Thermoregulation Effectors if too cold, part 1
    24. 24. Thermoregulation Effectors if too cold, part 1 Goosebumps - erector pili muscles cc licensed flickr photo by MaryLane: http://flickr.com/photos/marylane/520905761/
    25. 25. Thermoregulation Effectors if too cold, part 1 Goosebumps - erector pili muscles cc licensed flickr photo by MaryLane: http://flickr.com/photos/marylane/520905761/ Shivering cc licensed flickr photo by Beat Machine: http://flickr.com/photos/bqwec/212277755/
    26. 26. Thermoregulation Effectors if too cold, part 2
    27. 27. Thermoregulation Effectors if too cold, part 2 • vasoconstriction (blood vessels close up so heat isn’t lost through the skin) • adrenal and thyroid glands - increase overall metabolism
    28. 28. Blood sugar regulation cc licensed flickr photo by EUSKALANATO: http://flickr.com/photos/ 17657816@N05/1971827663/ Receptor (hypothalmus) responds to high blood sugar level Control center (hypothalmus) Sends signal to the pancreas releases insulin cc licensed flickr photo by djneight: http://flickr.com/photos/thedjneight/4119439462/
    29. 29. Effects of insulin • cells absorb more glucose (blood sugar) • liver stores glucose as glycogen • fat storage Lower blood sugar level
    30. 30. Water balance Another example of homeostasis
    31. 31. Kangaroo Rat lives in hot desert cc licensed flickr photo by ucumari: http://flickr.com/photos/ucumari/3955842320/
    32. 32. Little water in environment. Does not drink water! All water comes from breakdown of nutrients. cc licensed flickr photo by ucumari: http://flickr.com/photos/ucumari/3955842320/
    33. 33. Needs to conserve water. How? cc licensed flickr photo by ucumari: http://flickr.com/photos/ucumari/3955842320/
    34. 34. Behavioural - nocturnal (active at night, sleeps during the day cc licensed flickr photo by ucumari: http://flickr.com/photos/ucumari/3955842320/
    35. 35. Physiological - miminum water lost from urination. (5 times more concentrated that human urine) cc licensed flickr photo by ucumari: http://flickr.com/photos/ucumari/3955842320/
    36. 36. Also need to avoid having too much water. Excess water leads to thinner blood.
    37. 37. Thinner blood leads to reduced concentration of red blood cells (a.k.a. anemia). Not enough oxygen gets to the cells. cc licensed flickr photo by kingdesmond1337: http://flickr.com/photos/kingdesmond/2872482711/
    38. 38. If blood is really dilute, the red blood cells can rupture cc licensed flickr photo by kingdesmond1337: http://flickr.com/photos/kingdesmond/2872482711/
    39. 39. Water balance is maintained homeostatically. Sensor Control centre Effector
    40. 40. Sensors Hypothalmus - senses concentration of blood. Blood vessels - sense blood volume. If concentration is too cc licensed flickr photo by EUSKALANATO: http:// flickr.com/photos/17657816@N05/1971827663/ high or blood volume is low, sends signal to the ...
    41. 41. Controller Pituitary gland (right next to hypothalmus) If blood concentration is too high, it secretes vasopressin cc licensed flickr photo by EUSKALANATO: http:// flickr.com/photos/17657816@N05/1971827663/ (a.k.a. antidiuretic hormone a.k.a. ADH), a hormone that acts on the ...
    42. 42. Effector Kidneys ADH causes the kidney to reduce urine production. Water loss through kidneys is reduced. Caffeine and alcohol are both ADH inhibitors Brain The hypothalmus activates parts cc licensed flickr photo by Kaptain Kobold: http:// flickr.com/photos/kaptainkobold/273001185/ of brain that cause thirst.
    43. 43. What if there’s too much water? Hypothalmus The hypothalmus stops sending signals to thirst centres and to pituitary. Pituitary decreases ADH secreted. Kidneys release more water into urine

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