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Video Production: Non-fiction
Video Production: Non-fiction
Video Production: Non-fiction
Video Production: Non-fiction
Video Production: Non-fiction
Video Production: Non-fiction
Video Production: Non-fiction
Video Production: Non-fiction
Video Production: Non-fiction
Video Production: Non-fiction
Video Production: Non-fiction
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Video Production: Non-fiction

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Transcript

  • 1. Non-fiction Production
  • 2. Why Documentary? Whether we like it or not, we will mostlikely need to be engaged in some sortof non-fiction production in our careers What are some program formats that rely ondocumentary forms? Just like fiction filmmaking the vision ofthese is determined by the director, forgood or for bad Retro Training Video The Archive
  • 3. Documentary Approaches What are the primary approaches of eachof these modes? News: Leprechaun in Alabama Expository Documentary: Ken Burns, HistoryChannel, BTAD Marketing Observational: High School Interactive/Cinema Verite: GreyGardens, Chapter 10 Personal: Super Size Me, Chapter 16 Propaganda: Triumph of the Will, Why We Fight
  • 4. Corporate DocumentaryExercise Pair up with 1-2 people Find a documentary style video from one ofthese companies Vmgstudio520.com Trifilm.com Pyramideproductions.com 4thavemedia.com Answer the questions that are on thehandout Share your video with the rest of the class
  • 5. Taking your own approach Ultimately, it’s about finding your ownstyle and telling the stories that you wantto tell Jacob Hinmon
  • 6. Where do we start?Know your audience. Know your purpose.Photo by Thomas Hawk, licensed under CC
  • 7. How should we shoot adocumentary? Figure out how you want totell the story Expositional documentaryforms are good for trying to giveviewers an overall approach toa certain subject More personal documentariesallow the viewer to extrapolate.Viewers learn about a topicthrough their experience withthe subject
  • 8. Typical Documentary Workflow Decide your purpose/focus Have your subject sign a release form Interview your subject Sit down interview vs. working interview Be sure to remember good interviewing techniques Shoot B-Roll Think about what kind of b-roll you can get beforeyou shoot the interview You want to make a logical connection between animage and the words of the interview Gather any additional graphics that you mightwant to use in the edit
  • 9. B-Roll Exercise Think of a person that you know.Imagine that you were going to do adocumentary on their daily job What would be your focus? What questions would you ask them? Write a list of 5 shots that you would gatherfor B-Roll What are the best ways to phrasequestions so we get good responses?
  • 10. Documentary Scripting On longer documentaries, you will wantto use some kind of scripting technique Usually an assistant will go through thefootage and transcribe the interview The director can then go through thetranscription and decide which portion of theinterview they want to include in the final edit Sometimes the documentary will be writtenout in a two-column script format
  • 11. Group Project 2: Documentary For this project you will be working withyour group to create a 2-3 minutedocumentary All of the shots should be properlylit, exposed, and focused

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