Water is a very sensitive topic in  my community recently. There are issues about water which are polarizing citizens of C...
So, how can water be polarizing? H 2 O
<ul><li>First, a little background information on water usage for these three communities. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1963, thes...
<ul><li>Recent increases in water prices have led the commission, </li></ul><ul><li>also known as the JWC to “to explore t...
So, what does this have to do with technology? <ul><li>It takes technology to treat water ! </li></ul>
<ul><li>Minneapolis is faced with upgrading its current water treatment equipment because  </li></ul><ul><li>Some of its c...
The new water treatment systems will include reverse-osmosis technology ,  which works by pushing low-pressure water throu...
<ul><li>It is these upgrades that are causing the increases in water prices for the JWC communities. </li></ul>
<ul><li>In an effort to contain costs, New Hope and Golden Valley  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>converted the water meters to a r...
Because an initial study by the JWC showed the communities  “…should consider ‘going it alone’ if Minneapolis rates increa...
What comprises this proposed independent water supply and treatment system? <ul><li>New wells would tap the Prairie du Che...
<ul><li>In recent months, the JWC has been using the potential of an independent water supply system as a bargaining chip ...
<ul><li>The JWC wants the citizens to be aware of  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>all the information it has collected in seven yea...
So, what’s the controversy?
<ul><li>The possibility of these communities building their own state-of-the-art water supply, treatment, and distribution...
Point: Counterpoint: To which water engineer for Crystal responded: “… the process used would be the tried and true … chlo...
Point: Counterpoint: Lime is used for softening, not filtering. Besides, independent engineering studies have recommended ...
Point: Counterpoint: Again, the Crystal water engineer responded : “ The amount of water [the JWC] would withdraw COMBINED...
<ul><li>In conclusion, there are several social, political, and economic implications resulting from either choice. </li><...
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Jwc Controversy Presentation 2

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Jwc Controversy Presentation 2

  1. 1. Water is a very sensitive topic in my community recently. There are issues about water which are polarizing citizens of Crystal, Golden Valley, & New Hope
  2. 2. So, how can water be polarizing? H 2 O
  3. 3. <ul><li>First, a little background information on water usage for these three communities. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1963, these cities formed a commission </li></ul><ul><ul><li>to Build and operate a shared water storage, & distribution system, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>and to purchase treated water from Minneapolis. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>This entity in known as the </li></ul><ul><li>However, the contract with Mpls expired in 1991 </li></ul><ul><li>And from 1997 – 2002, water rates have increased 156%, </li></ul><ul><li>( YIKES!) </li></ul><ul><li>With an estimated further increase of 32% through 2007 </li></ul><ul><li>Since then the water has been : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Economical </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Plentiful (Mpls gets its water from the Mississippi River) </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>Recent increases in water prices have led the commission, </li></ul><ul><li>also known as the JWC to “to explore the possibility of an </li></ul><ul><li>alternative water system instead of continuing to buy water from Minneapolis.” </li></ul>
  5. 5. So, what does this have to do with technology? <ul><li>It takes technology to treat water ! </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>Minneapolis is faced with upgrading its current water treatment equipment because </li></ul><ul><li>Some of its current systems are more than 100 years old </li></ul><ul><li>do not provide a complete barrier against pathogens and harmful bacteria occurring in river water. </li></ul>
  7. 7. The new water treatment systems will include reverse-osmosis technology , which works by pushing low-pressure water through a fine membrane with extremely small openings. <ul><li>Some of the advantages of Reverse-osmosis technology are </li></ul><ul><li>treatment media occupies less space, </li></ul><ul><li>facilities are easily expanded, </li></ul><ul><li>reduced by-product disposal </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>It is these upgrades that are causing the increases in water prices for the JWC communities. </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>In an effort to contain costs, New Hope and Golden Valley </li></ul><ul><ul><li>converted the water meters to a radio transmission system in 2001-02. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This reduced meter reading time by > 2/3 </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Because an initial study by the JWC showed the communities “…should consider ‘going it alone’ if Minneapolis rates increased significantly., the JWC authorized a preliminary Water System Feasibility Study which indicated that an independent water system would be both technically and economically feasible.”
  11. 11. What comprises this proposed independent water supply and treatment system? <ul><li>New wells would tap the Prairie du Chein-Jordan aquifer, a large groundwater system running southwest and southeast into Iowa from the Twin Cities </li></ul><ul><li>Use reverse-osmosis technology </li></ul><ul><li>along with existing wells, would only tap 7% of aquifer’s potential </li></ul><ul><li>supply 27 Mgd for worst-case usage </li></ul><ul><li>require a new treatment-to-storage delivery system </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>In recent months, the JWC has been using the potential of an independent water supply system as a bargaining chip with Minneapolis </li></ul><ul><ul><li>in order to obtain a 30-year contract for water </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>at prices significantly lower than current. </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. <ul><li>The JWC wants the citizens to be aware of </li></ul><ul><ul><li>all the information it has collected in seven years so that an </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>informed, objective decision can be made regarding the future water arrangements. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This has been accomplished through mass mailing of detailed flyers about the project, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>and by conducting community water fair, where citizens can review information and data and ask questions of officials </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. So, what’s the controversy?
  15. 15. <ul><li>The possibility of these communities building their own state-of-the-art water supply, treatment, and distribution system has instigated an </li></ul><ul><ul><li>emotional response from some citizens. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Many of these responses are not based on fact. </li></ul></ul>
  16. 16. Point: Counterpoint: To which water engineer for Crystal responded: “… the process used would be the tried and true … chlorine and a number of other chemicals in smaller quantities. The resulting … sludge is caustic but pose no danger to humans unless you choose to take a bath in it. The chlorine comes in … one-ton cylinders. These things have been dropped from airplanes onto dirt (as a test) and have survived the impact. State and federal law requires the facility to be able to neutralize the entire one ton if it were to escape into the containment building they are required to be housed in on site.” From the Duluth Ch. Of Commerce: “ The sewer plant stinks…it would take a half billion dollars to move it. The intake plant is approximately 15 miles up the north shore. Some days [the smell] is better than others.We also have two other businesses that add to the smell.” One citizen’s concern is about the chemicals… The same person expressed concern is about the smells…
  17. 17. Point: Counterpoint: Lime is used for softening, not filtering. Besides, independent engineering studies have recommended membrane, not lime softening. The membrane technology (reverse osmosis) will also take care of the filtering requirements: <ul><li>“ Therefore, a base plan concept for a new JWC Water System includes reliance upon membrane softening technology, including iron/manganese treatment, for production of finished water.” </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Joint Water Commission </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Water System Feasibility Study </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Prepared by: </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Environmental Financial Group, Inc. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Brown and Caldwell Perlorica, Inc. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>September, 2002 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>Another citizen is concerned about cost : Another as concerned that the filtering was not “state-of-the-art”
  18. 18. Point: Counterpoint: Again, the Crystal water engineer responded : “ The amount of water [the JWC] would withdraw COMBINED with … existing municipal wells … in western Hennepin County represents only 7% of the water presently flowing through the aquifer …if you were to dig down [about] 25 feet … you would have a flowing artesian well. That is how much water is in this 200' thick formation of which the top is 300' below the surface.” There are concerns if there will be enough water from the wells And there are concerns about politics…
  19. 19. <ul><li>In conclusion, there are several social, political, and economic implications resulting from either choice. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Citizen anger over “process” by feeling left-out, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Poor decision making by the public due to lack of knowledge because of their poor research, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Resistance to change due to the same lack of facts, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Public officials risk losing their next election if they make the wrong choice, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Traffic disruption due to new water line construction, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Unknown future events causing price increases, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Potential cost savings and reduced water rates passes on to consumers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Loss of revenue for Minneapolis </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Yet, I believe the public officials from these cities have the education, the experience, and the information necessary to make a correct decision. </li></ul>

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