20091101 Planning Board Land Use Committee

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Proposed Rezoning of the Broadway Corridor, Somerville, MA

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20091101 Planning Board Land Use Committee

  1. 1. Rezoning Broadway: Winter Hill to East Somerville Joint P bli H J i t Public Hearing i Land Use Committee of the Board of Aldermen and Somerville Planning Board November 5, 2009 Monica R. Lamboy Executive Di t E ti Director OSPCD
  2. 2. Why Rezone Broadway? • Protect Residential Property Owners with: • Better set backs • Screening of rooftop mechanical equipment • Taking residential p p y out of the commercial g property district • Gross vs. Net Sqft. • Give greater certainty about new development G • Establish guidelines that reflect what the Community wants and expects. expects • Promote economic vitality
  3. 3. Why Rezone Broadway? • Leverage access to existing & future rapid transit stations • Key opportunity sites on large parcels in critical locations • Enable existing and potential businesses to grow compatibly with residential neighbors • Support ongoing resurgence th S t i through M i St t h Main Streets • Provide new focus to East Somerville and Winter Hill
  4. 4. Strengths of Broadway Corridor • Excellent transportation access: Rail, Road, & Bus • Active community & business groups • Distinctive neighborhood character • Strong public health system • Diversity of residents and businesses • Many families • Historic corridor
  5. 5. Existing Challenges • Current zoning impede expansion and redevelopment • Limited public open space • Imbalance between vehicle vehicle, pedestrian, bicyclists • Underdeveloped p p parcels • Disconnected neighborhoods • Limited off-street parking off street • Width of Street overwhelms existing built environment • Residential neighborhoods impacted by I-93
  6. 6. Existing Character
  7. 7. Existing Character
  8. 8. Existing Character
  9. 9. Existing Character
  10. 10. Process to Develop Proposal • Kickoff Meeting - November 2008 • Four (4) Focus Group Meetings • Developed vision for area • Evaluated blocks & sites for redevelopment, infill, or preservation • Reviewed zoning alternatives • Rezoning proposal drafted • 2nd Community Meeting - March 2009 • 3rd Community Meeting - May 2009 May, • Neighborhood Meetings, July 1, July 22 and July 29 • 4th Community Meeting – August 12 2009 12, • Submit proposal to Board of Aldermen – September
  11. 11. Vision for Broadway Corridor • Safe, vibrant street with daytime and nighttime activity • A mix of businesses that are attractive to nearby residents • Economic revitalization • Green spaces as well as plazas • Green buildings • Create a gateway to the City
  12. 12. Key Organizing Principles 1. Respect transition between commercial & residential districts Rear Yard Setbacks Upper levels of buildings set back pp g Screening of mechanical equipment 2. Ensure design q g quality and compatibility y p y Design guidelines for each area 3. 3 Provide greater certainty to applicants & abutters Clear standards No waivers ai ers Most intensive review for new construction
  13. 13. Key Organizing Principles 4. Facilitate development in opportunity areas p pp y Redevelop underutilized areas Infill development where appropriate Preserve existing development character in areas 5. Balance circulation amenities Pedestrian-friendly uses and building design y g g Reduce parking requirements 6. Encourage sustainable development Green building incentives in certain districts Promote pedestrian and bicycle activity
  14. 14. Zoning Study Area
  15. 15. Residential Properties Preserved • 11 Langmaid g • 8 Cross Street East • 13 Langmaid • 10 Cross Street East • 15/17 Langmaid • 12 Cross Street East • 14/16 Langmaid • 14 Cross Street East • 257 School • 16 Cross Street East • 6 Kensington • 6/8 Wisconsin • 8/10 Kensington • 7/9 Wisconsin • 12/12A Kensington • 6/6A Franklin • 14/16 Kensington • 10/12 George • 20 Kensington • 11 George • 24 Kensington • 11 McArthur • 26/28 Kensington • 3/5 Kensington • 9 Kensington
  16. 16. Proposed Zoning near Sullivan Sq.
  17. 17. Transit Oriented District 55 (TOD 55) Purpose: To allow for mixed-use development opportunities in close proximity to existing lower-density residential neighborhoods. Where mapped in commercial streets, development is anticipated to be a mix of commercial and residential uses. Characteristics: • Mid-rise primarily residential upper floors Mid rise • Creates buffer for residential neighborhoods • Structured parking Maximum Height: 55 Feet (5 more than currently allowed) Maximum FAR: 3.0 (1 more than currently allowed) Setbacks: S tb k None (T N (Transition t R id ti l R iti to Residential Required) i d)
  18. 18. Transit Oriented District 55 (TOD 55) Maximum Height: 55 Feet (5 more than currently allowed) Maximum FAR: 3.0 (1 more than currently allowed) Setbacks: S tb k None (Transition to Residential Required) N
  19. 19. Transit Oriented District 55 (TOD 55) Maximum Height: 55 Feet (5 more than currently allowed) Maximum FAR: 3.0 (1 more than currently allowed) Setbacks: S tb k None (Transition to Residential Required) N
  20. 20. Transit Oriented District 70 (TOD 70) Purpose: This moderate-density sub-district shall complement nearby existing developments and serve as a gateway to higher-density districts. Pedestrian oriented uses are often required in this sub- district along major public streets to encourage activity at the street level. Characteristics: • Pedestrian oriented requirement supports street level activity • Upper level step back after 55 ft height • Green building incentive • 5% arts related uses • 15% affordable housing Maximum Height: g 70 Feet if Green (20 more than currently allowed) Maximum FAR: 4.0 if Green (2 more than currently allowed) Setbacks: None (Transition to Residential Required)
  21. 21. Transit Oriented District 70 (TOD 70) Maximum Height: 70 Feet if Green (20 more than currently allowed) Maximum FAR: 4.0 if Green (2 more than currently allowed) Setbacks: S tb k None (Transition to Residential Required) N
  22. 22. Pedestrian Oriented Requirement • Identify blocks that need specific requirement for pedestrian uses: 35% to 65%. • Pedestrian Uses include: • Small or large retail and service; • E ti and d i ki establishments; Eating d drinking t bli h t • Parks and open space; • Rapid transit facilities; and • Municipal uses. • Will allow space for lobby and entry to parking.
  23. 23. TOD Transitions Transition to Residential Districts: In the proposed TOD districts, would require either (a) a 20 foot setback that is completely landscaped, or (b) allow structures to be built on the property line with a high quality, aesthetically pleasing wall to a maximum height of 24 feet and a upper floor step back of 40 feet from the district line. Proposed Existing
  24. 24. TOD Transitions Transition to Residential Districts: In the proposed TOD districts, would require either (a) ( ) a 20 f foot setback that i completely landscaped, or b k h is l l l d d (b) allow structures to be built on the property line with a high quality, aesthetically pleasing wall to a maximum height of 24 feet and a upper floor step back of 40 feet from the district line. Existing Proposed
  25. 25. Winter Hill Close Up
  26. 26. Corridor Commercial District (CCD) Purpose: To manage development along heavily traveled transportation corridors, especially where those corridors meet at commercial squares. Characteristics • Commercial ground floor • Small S ll commercial bi l bays • Infill development • Reduced parking requirements • Payment in lieu of parking P t i li f ki Maximum Height: 55 Feet (5 more than currently allowed) Maximum FAR: 3.0 3 0 (1 more than currently allowed) Setbacks: None (Transition to Residential Required)
  27. 27. Corridor Commercial District (CCD) Transition to Residential Districts: The proposed CCD district would require a minimum setback of 20 feet and mandates that to 10 feet closest to the residential district be landscaped to provide a better buffer. Additionally, any portion of a building that exceeds 35 feet in height must step back an additional 15 feet from the residential district further protecting local residents. i l l id Existing Proposed
  28. 28. Corridor Commercial District (CCD) Maximum Height: 55 Feet (5 more than currently allowed) Maximum FAR: 3.0 (1 more than currently allowed) Setbacks: S tb k None (Transition to Residential Required) N
  29. 29. Corridor Commercial District (CCD) Maximum Height: 55 Feet (5 more than currently allowed) Maximum FAR: 3.0 (1 more than currently allowed) Setbacks: S tb k None (Transition to Residential Required) N
  30. 30. Residence C (RC) District Purpose: To establish and preserve medium density neighborhoods of p y g one-, two-, and three-family homes, free from other uses except those which are both compatible with and convenient to the residents of such districts. Characteristics: Permitted Uses: P itt d U 1-, 2-, & 3-family by right; Multiple dwellings by special permit; Some commercial uses under 5,000 s.f. by right; S f Some commercial uses by special permit Maximum Height: 3 stories or 40 feet Maximum FAR: 2.0 Setbacks: 15’ front; 20’ rear; variable side
  31. 31. Residence C (RC) District Maximum Height: g 3 stories or 40 feet Maximum FAR: 2.0 Setbacks: 15’ front; 20’ rear; variable side
  32. 32. Future Character of Broadway
  33. 33. Proposed Map Amendment
  34. 34. Winter Hill Close Up
  35. 35. Central Broadway Close Up
  36. 36. TOD- TOD-55 & 70 Close Up
  37. 37. Retail Hierarchy • Convenience Shopping District • Population: 3,000 – 5,000 • Types of Retail: (∼ 90% Independent) Corner Markets, Quick Service Restaurants, Laundromats, Clothing stores, ATM’s • Neighborhood Shopping District • Population: 4,000 – 20,000 • Types of Retail: (∼ 75% Indy) Bakeries, Banks, Full Service Restaurants, Grocery, Pharmacies, Hardware, Furniture • City Wide Shopping District • Population: 15,000 – 80,000 • Types of Retail: (∼ 50% Indy) Supermarkets, Discount Department Stores, Sporting Goods, Office Supply, Jewelry • Regional Shopping District • Population: 70,000 – 200,000+ • Types of Retail: ( ∼ 25% Indy) Fashion Clothing Cinema Department Stores Clothing, Cinema, Stores, Large Format Specialty Stores
  38. 38. Retail Hierarchy Mapped Regional City- City-Wide Shopping Sh i Shopping District District Neighborhood Shopping District
  39. 39. NEXT STEPS Board of Aldermen • Public hearing of Land Use Committee & Planning Board • Closed public hearing of Land Use Committee & Planning Board • Planning Board recommendation to BoA • BoA decision
  40. 40. Thanks to Focus Group! Carrie Dancy Ald. Ald Walter Pero Joe Grafton Ellin Reisner Alfred Dellicicchi Ald. Bill Roche Denise March Jeff Takle Stephen Martorano Erika Tarlin Sandra McGoldrick Anne Tate Cecily Miller Lynne Thompson Ian Newton Ken Totah Peter Tsourianis
  41. 41. CONTACT INFO Monica Lamboy, Executive Director mlamboy@somervillema.gov Rob May, Director of Economic Devt rmay@somervillema.gov Melisa Tintocalis, Principal Planner mtintocalis@somervillema.gov Steven Azar, Senior Planner sazar@somervillema.gov Christopher Diiorio, Senior Planner cdiiorio@somervillema.gov Lori Massa, Planner lmassa@somervillema.gov lmassa@somervillema gov OSPCD 93 Highland Avenue Somerville, MA 02143 617-625-6600 x 2500 www.somervillema.gov

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