One Fool’s Survival Guide to Presentations <ul><li>Presented by Greg Robleto </li></ul>
Why are we here? <ul><li>Presentation anxiety is not uncommon. </li></ul><ul><li>We get nervous </li></ul><ul><li>We get d...
Why are we here? <ul><li>We want to avoid this. </li></ul>
Why are we here? <ul><li>You tell me: </li></ul><ul><li>Greatest presentation you’ve ever seen? </li></ul><ul><li>Worst pr...
Why are we here? <ul><li>Sometimes it’s REALLY important. </li></ul>
What is a presentation? Outline: Page 1
Overview and summary <ul><li>A great presentation involves: </li></ul><ul><li>Reading  (your audience) </li></ul><ul><li>W...
Reading <ul><li>your audience </li></ul>
<ul><li>Ask and answer three questions about your audience </li></ul><ul><li>What do they do? </li></ul><ul><li>What do th...
What do they do? <ul><li>Knowing your audience means knowing their function in their organization. </li></ul><ul><li>Level...
What do they know? <ul><li>A presentation lives and dies by appropriate granularity. So what do they know… </li></ul><ul><...
What do they care? <ul><li>If your audience leaves without being educated and/or moved to action, you have failed.  So it ...
Overview and summary <ul><li>A great presentation involves: </li></ul><ul><li>Reading  (your audience) </li></ul><ul><li>W...
Writing <ul><li>your story </li></ul>
Pre-writing: thinking it through <ul><li>Before you even open PowerPoint, take the time to think it through. </li></ul><ul...
Writing (your story) <ul><li>Writing a presentation should be just like writing an essay . </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction ...
Thesis Statement <ul><li>This is the very reason you are meeting </li></ul><ul><li>Clear, concise, yet comprehensive </li>...
Conclusion & Implication <ul><li>Wrap it up. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t Make Them Think </li></ul><ul><li>Call to Action </li...
Body <ul><li>Make your argument! </li></ul><ul><li>Get organized </li></ul><ul><li>Write a story </li></ul><ul><li>Keep yo...
Introduction <ul><li>You did not call this meeting to give an introduction. </li></ul><ul><li>Keep it short </li></ul><ul>...
Review, then review again. <ul><li>What could possibly go wrong? </li></ul><ul><li>Put yourself in your audience’s shoes <...
Overview and summary <ul><li>A great presentation involves: </li></ul><ul><li>Reading  (your audience) </li></ul><ul><li>W...
Riviting <ul><li>their attention </li></ul>
Riveting (their attention): <ul><li>It’s all about eliminating distractions… </li></ul><ul><li>In your “deck” </li></ul><u...
Distractions in Design <ul><li>Let’s keep it clean . </li></ul><ul><li>Eliminate (if not, minimize) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>...
Distractions in Design Riveting
Distractions in Design Riveting
Distractions in Design Riveting
Distractions in Design Riveting
Could our sites load faster?
People are remarkably bad at predicting their own behavior.
Distractions in Design <ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lpvgfmEU2Ck </li></ul>Riveting
Distractions in Data <ul><li>Show what you mean. </li></ul><ul><li>Minimize (if not, eliminate) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Spel...
Distractions in Data <ul><li>http://movieclips.com/H8VE-an-inconvenient-truth-movie-drastic-rise-in-co2-concentration/ </l...
Distractions in Density <ul><li>When you just can’t cut anything else from a presentation… </li></ul><ul><li>Minimize  (if...
Distractions in your Demeanor <ul><li>Here’s looking at you. </li></ul><ul><li>Eliminate  (if not, minimize) </li></ul><ul...
Distractions in your Demeanor <ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9NZOt6BkhUg </li></ul>Riveting
Summary <ul><li>A great presentation involves: </li></ul><ul><li>Reading  (your audience) </li></ul><ul><li>Writing  (your...
Discussion <ul><li>Any questions? </li></ul>
Homework <ul><li>(It’s optional) </li></ul>
Homework <ul><li>Prepare your own Presentation </li></ul><ul><li>Explain your job to a new Fool (or another topic of your ...
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Guide to Giving Presentations

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  • TomG: Master your craft Engage with other Fools Provide influence
  • Or the checking iPhone/Blackberry equivilant
  • Columbia shuttle damaged post-launch, slide presented to stakeholders determining next steps Technicians knew it was great risk Let PowerPoint do the talking PowerPoint wasn’t very articulate
  • Let’s break down each of these into more detail…
  • Level What kinds of decisions do they make? Do they need to be here? Locus Around what do those decisions revolve? Leanings What pre-conceptions will they bring?
  • About the background? Do they know the jargon/acronyms? Do they understand the concepts? About the topic? Is this coming as a surprise? Does it have “topical baggage?” About you? Do they trust you? Are they familiar with your style? Is there a comfort level among the group?
  • Affect them It matters to them personally Affect their department It matters to their co-workers/managers Affect their company It matters to their organization as a whole Affect you If you appear uninterested, you will pass that along
  • Take notes Ask yourself some questions What do you know? What do you want people to do? How do you get them there? Get some feedback Bounce your ideas off of someone you trust What is the appropriate format ? Do I even need Powerpoint? Most memorable/impactful oration did not need PowerPoint Imagine Dr MLK provides slides of his Dream Lincoln needing PowerPoint to give the Gettsburg Address… hmm
  • This is the very reason you are meeting Clear, concise, yet comprehensive Resist temptation to do a “reveal” of your idea Purpose of meeting is not solidified Tendency to “flip to the answer page”
  • Don’t Make Them Think Open to interpretation is for fiction: Does the top wobble or stop spinning? Was there really a tiger in the boat? - Do not expect your audience to make the right conclusion Write it down; make it clear Call to Action Best outcome: Firm decision with action steps to get there Next best: No decision with action steps to make decision: Least best (aka “Worst”): No decision and no action steps Accountability - 1) Follow up e-mail, 2) check in for progress, add’l needs &amp; blockers, 3) just trusting people
  • Get Organized - Create an outline - Read the outline - Get a feel for the flow Write a Story - Make it punchy - Stick to the main points and emphasize them Don’t omit critical information - No bonus points for length There may be penalties Keep your backup info handy - Appendices are great for this
  • Keep it Short Stick to Universals - If there are no universals on which to base an introduction, you and your audience are not ready for this meeting Gauge your Audience - Use your audience reconnaissance (back to reading)
  • What could possibly go wrong? Put yourself back in your Audience’s shoes What questions might they have that you haven’t answered? What additional questions will your material raise? Does it flow? Does it tell your story? Does it tell it well?
  • It’s about elimination because PowerPoint is so easy to abuse.
  • We’ll spend a little extra time in this first section cause it’s kinda my wheelhouse.
  • Wow, that’s noisy, and look he even has an iMac on the slide.
  • Clean, elegant, simple, focused. Apple’s personality comes out in it’s presentations.
  • Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal, the leader of American and NATO forces in Afghanistan, was shown a PowerPoint slide in Kabul last summer that was meant to portray the complexity of American military strategy, but looked more like a bowl of spaghetti. “ When we understand that slide, we’ll have won the war,” General McChrystal dryly remarked, one of his advisers recalled, as the room erupted in laughter.
  • Not really sure what’s the backstory behind this slide, but it’s a perfect example of design distraction because.. Yes, the pot of gold, WTF? Now, if you’ve seen me present, I typically go away from the TMF template and I do use a lot of imagery, but here’s the difference.
  • This slide was part of a series recapping notes from a conference. This is my personal style of no more than one line of text and preferable a single simple image. In this case, the turtle (as a metaphor) gives context to how I’m going to answer this posed question. Yes, many times over yes, and then I’ll talk about YSlow and Image Sprites and CSS minimization and all sorts of tech jargon that may lose some people, but if so, they can focus back on this slide and get the main point, we’re slow.
  • Here’s another from the same conference notes. - The image seems to be a non-sequiter or a distraction, right? but I’m going somewhere with this. I’m relaying a story about people being remarkably bad at predicting their own behavior. I tell how a fast food survey went out asking people about milkshakes. They responded they loved milkshake with dinner, but then later when statistical analysis was available it proved preferred between 7 – 9 AM. They treat themselves on the way to work. - When I recall this from the conference speaker, I think of it as the milkshake story, I want my audience to be able to pull it up in their memory quickly as the milkshake story. So, I emphasize my story with a big ol’ picture of a milkshake.
  • Compelling Content (Reading) Clearly Organized (Writing) Well Delivered (Riveting)
  • Guide to Giving Presentations

    1. 1. One Fool’s Survival Guide to Presentations <ul><li>Presented by Greg Robleto </li></ul>
    2. 2. Why are we here? <ul><li>Presentation anxiety is not uncommon. </li></ul><ul><li>We get nervous </li></ul><ul><li>We get derailed </li></ul><ul><li>We omit/forget key points </li></ul><ul><li>We were coerced/bribed </li></ul>
    3. 3. Why are we here? <ul><li>We want to avoid this. </li></ul>
    4. 4. Why are we here? <ul><li>You tell me: </li></ul><ul><li>Greatest presentation you’ve ever seen? </li></ul><ul><li>Worst presentation you’ve ever seen? </li></ul><ul><li>How does The Fool do on presentations? </li></ul>
    5. 5. Why are we here? <ul><li>Sometimes it’s REALLY important. </li></ul>
    6. 6. What is a presentation? Outline: Page 1
    7. 7. Overview and summary <ul><li>A great presentation involves: </li></ul><ul><li>Reading (your audience) </li></ul><ul><li>Writing (your story) </li></ul><ul><li>Riveting (their attention) </li></ul>
    8. 8. Reading <ul><li>your audience </li></ul>
    9. 9. <ul><li>Ask and answer three questions about your audience </li></ul><ul><li>What do they do? </li></ul><ul><li>What do they know? </li></ul><ul><li>What do they care? </li></ul>Reading your audience Reading
    10. 10. What do they do? <ul><li>Knowing your audience means knowing their function in their organization. </li></ul><ul><li>Level </li></ul><ul><li>Locus </li></ul><ul><li>Leanings </li></ul>Reading
    11. 11. What do they know? <ul><li>A presentation lives and dies by appropriate granularity. So what do they know… </li></ul><ul><li>About the background? </li></ul><ul><li>About the topic? </li></ul><ul><li>About you? </li></ul>Reading
    12. 12. What do they care? <ul><li>If your audience leaves without being educated and/or moved to action, you have failed. So it has to… </li></ul><ul><li>Affect them </li></ul><ul><li>Affect their department </li></ul><ul><li>Affect their company </li></ul><ul><li>Affect you </li></ul>Reading
    13. 13. Overview and summary <ul><li>A great presentation involves: </li></ul><ul><li>Reading (your audience) </li></ul><ul><li>Writing (your story) </li></ul><ul><li>Riveting (their attention) </li></ul>Reading
    14. 14. Writing <ul><li>your story </li></ul>
    15. 15. Pre-writing: thinking it through <ul><li>Before you even open PowerPoint, take the time to think it through. </li></ul><ul><li>Take notes </li></ul><ul><li>Ask yourself some questions </li></ul><ul><li>Get some feedback </li></ul><ul><li>What is the appropriate format ? </li></ul>Writing
    16. 16. Writing (your story) <ul><li>Writing a presentation should be just like writing an essay . </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Thesis </li></ul><ul><li>Body </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusion </li></ul><ul><li>Implications </li></ul><ul><li>But don’t do them in this order! </li></ul>Writing INTRODUCTION THESIS BODY CONCLUSION IMPLICATIONS
    17. 17. Thesis Statement <ul><li>This is the very reason you are meeting </li></ul><ul><li>Clear, concise, yet comprehensive </li></ul><ul><li>Resist temptation to do a “reveal” </li></ul>Writing
    18. 18. Conclusion & Implication <ul><li>Wrap it up. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t Make Them Think </li></ul><ul><li>Call to Action </li></ul><ul><li>Accountability </li></ul>Writing
    19. 19. Body <ul><li>Make your argument! </li></ul><ul><li>Get organized </li></ul><ul><li>Write a story </li></ul><ul><li>Keep your backup info handy </li></ul>Writing
    20. 20. Introduction <ul><li>You did not call this meeting to give an introduction. </li></ul><ul><li>Keep it short </li></ul><ul><li>Stick to universals </li></ul><ul><li>Gauge your audience </li></ul>Writing
    21. 21. Review, then review again. <ul><li>What could possibly go wrong? </li></ul><ul><li>Put yourself in your audience’s shoes </li></ul><ul><li>Does it flow? </li></ul>Writing
    22. 22. Overview and summary <ul><li>A great presentation involves: </li></ul><ul><li>Reading (your audience) </li></ul><ul><li>Writing (your story) </li></ul><ul><li>Riveting (their attention) </li></ul>
    23. 23. Riviting <ul><li>their attention </li></ul>
    24. 24. Riveting (their attention): <ul><li>It’s all about eliminating distractions… </li></ul><ul><li>In your “deck” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Design </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Data </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Density </li></ul></ul><ul><li>In your demeanor </li></ul>Page Outline: Page 3 Riveting
    25. 25. Distractions in Design <ul><li>Let’s keep it clean . </li></ul><ul><li>Eliminate (if not, minimize) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Clip-Art </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Font changes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Layout changes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sound effects </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Transitions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Maximize </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Consistency in all respects </li></ul></ul>Riveting
    26. 26. Distractions in Design Riveting
    27. 27. Distractions in Design Riveting
    28. 28. Distractions in Design Riveting
    29. 29. Distractions in Design Riveting
    30. 30. Could our sites load faster?
    31. 31. People are remarkably bad at predicting their own behavior.
    32. 32. Distractions in Design <ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lpvgfmEU2Ck </li></ul>Riveting
    33. 33. Distractions in Data <ul><li>Show what you mean. </li></ul><ul><li>Minimize (if not, eliminate) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Spelling errors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Data-laden tables </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Misleading charts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Chart bling” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Maximize </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Helpful, pertinent, clean charts and tables that support your thesis </li></ul></ul>Riveting
    34. 34. Distractions in Data <ul><li>http://movieclips.com/H8VE-an-inconvenient-truth-movie-drastic-rise-in-co2-concentration/ </li></ul>Riveting
    35. 35. Distractions in Density <ul><li>When you just can’t cut anything else from a presentation… </li></ul><ul><li>Minimize (if not, eliminate) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Lengthy paragraphs </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Maximize </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Page numbers (and references to other page numbers) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Repetition </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Wayfinding” systems </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tables of contents </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Repetition </li></ul></ul>Riveting
    36. 36. Distractions in your Demeanor <ul><li>Here’s looking at you. </li></ul><ul><li>Eliminate (if not, minimize) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Distracting handouts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reading your presentation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Nervousness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Um” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Post screw-up “bleh” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Words you or other business people have made up </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>“ Collaborately” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>“ Irregardless” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Technical Glitches </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Maximize </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Eye contact </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Continuity </li></ul></ul>Riveting
    37. 37. Distractions in your Demeanor <ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9NZOt6BkhUg </li></ul>Riveting
    38. 38. Summary <ul><li>A great presentation involves: </li></ul><ul><li>Reading (your audience) </li></ul><ul><li>Writing (your story) </li></ul><ul><li>Riveting (their attention) </li></ul>
    39. 39. Discussion <ul><li>Any questions? </li></ul>
    40. 40. Homework <ul><li>(It’s optional) </li></ul>
    41. 41. Homework <ul><li>Prepare your own Presentation </li></ul><ul><li>Explain your job to a new Fool (or another topic of your choosing) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Presented in about 1 week </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>~ 6 minutes in length </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>~ 20 slides (if you use PowerPoint at all) </li></ul></ul>

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