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Vermont National Partner Workshop - Students and Faculty in the Archives (SAFA)

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SAFA national partner workshop. The University of Vermont. Burlington, VT. May 1, 2014.

SAFA national partner workshop. The University of Vermont. Burlington, VT. May 1, 2014.

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  • 1. Na#onal  Partner  Workshop Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives Burlington,  VT Thursday,  May  1,  2014 Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 2. Welcome! 9:00  –  9:30   IntroducCons 9:30  –  10:30 What  is  SAFA? 10:30  -­‐  1:00                 Pedagogical  Design 1:00  –  2:00 LUNCH  on  your  own 2:00  –  3:00 VisiCng  the  Archives  (in  Special  CollecCons) 3:00  –  4:00 Planning  Your  Archives  Experience 4:00  -­‐  4:30                         Wrap-­‐Up                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 3. Introduc#ons • Julie  Golia,  PhD Historian  /  SAFA  Co-­‐Director • Robin  M.  Katz,  MLIS Archivist  /  SAFA  Co-­‐Director                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 4. Introduc#ons • Your  vitals  (name,  department) • Your  experience  teaching  with  primary  sources • Where  are  you  in  your  planning? • What  is  your  biggest  quesCon  at  this  point?                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 5. What  is  SAFA? • Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  was  an   innovaCve  postsecondary  educaCon  program   which  used  primary  sources  to  teach  document   analysis,  informaCon  literacy,  and  criCcal   thinking  skills  in  first-­‐year  undergraduates.                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 6. What  is  SAFA? • SAFA  resulted  in  TeachArchives.org   – Project  documenta>on  and  findings – Sample  exercises  (with  some  digi>zed  documents) – Ar>cles  on  pedagogy  by  us  and  faculty – Wide-­‐ranging  audience                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 7. What  is  SAFA? • Three  year,  $750,000  US  Dept  of  EducaCon  FIPSE  grant   – Jan  2011  un>l  Dec  2013  (in  extension  now) • Three  schools  within  walking  distance – City  Tech  (CUNY),  LIU  Brooklyn,  St.  Francis • Nineteen  local  partner  faculty – All  ranks  and  stages  of  career – Wide  range  of  disciplines  (not  just  history) – Variety  of  classes  (seminars,  surveys,  etc.) – Intellectual  and  professional  community • NaConal  partners                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 8. What  is  SAFA? • Centered  around  class  visits  to  the  archives • Item-­‐level  document  analysis   – not  independent  student  research • Over  four  semesters  (Fall  2011  -­‐  Spring  2013) – 1,100  individual  students – 63  courses – 100+  class  visits  to  Brooklyn  Historical  Society • Breadth  of  project  allowed  for   experimentaCon,  lessons,  crafing  pedagogy                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 9. What  is  SAFA? • Brooklyn  SAFA:  student  populaCon – Mostly  first-­‐year  /  early  academic  career – Very  diverse:  many  minority,  non-­‐tradi>onal   students,  and  other  under-­‐represented  groups – Mostly  products  of  NYC  public  schools – Many  interna>onal  students,  new  Americans,  or   non-­‐na>ve  speakers  of  English • Consider  your  student  populaCon                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 10. What  is  SAFA? • Sampling  of  SAFA  classes – Robin  Michals,  Introduc)on  to  Digital  Photography   – Jen  Wingate,  Visual  Culture  of  the  Civil  War   – Sara  Haviland,  U.S.,  1896-­‐present   – Geoff  Zylstra,  Early  American  History   – Leah  Dilworth,  American  Literature   – Ma?hew  Gold,  English  Composi)on:  Fire,  Disease,  Disaster   and  the  Shaping  of  Urban  Public  Space                                        Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 11. What  is  SAFA? • Beginners  need  to  be  taught  document  analysis • Our  teaching  philosophy – Specific  learning  objec>ves – Individual  documents • The  fewer  the  be?er! – Tailored  small-­‐group  ac>vi>es – Directed,  specific  prompts • Ex:  “Why  did  Henry  Ward  Beecher  write  this  le?er?” • Not  “Who  is  the  creator?  What  type  of  doc  is  this?”                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 12. SAFA  Findings • Independent  evaluators  have  found  that  SAFA   students  are  more  engaged,  perform  beger,   and  -­‐  in  some  cases  -­‐  have  higher  retenCon   rates  than  their  peers. – Findings  summarized  on  TeachArchives.org – Final  Report  due  December  2014 – Last  Evalua>on  Report  (2012)  in  folders  and  online                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 13. Findings:  Observa#on  Skills • Q:  Why  might  this  document  be  worth   preserving  in  an  archive?                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society PRE POST Students  noMng  a  single  feature   of  giving  a  vague  response 72% 49% Students  noMng  mulMple  physical   features 28% 51% Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 14. Findings:  Ar#cula#ng  ‘a   usable  past’ • Q:  Why  might  this  document  be  worth   preserving  in  an  archive?                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Sample  PRE  responses Sample  POST  responses This  is  a  photo  from  the  past To  show  how  society  valued   entertainment Because  it  showed  what  was  going   on  at  that  moment. [It]  shows  how  technology  was   progressing  in  the  US. It  gives  insight...  to  what  life  was   like  during  the  1960s. It  shows  how  people  were   sending  postal  cards  through  the   telegrams  and  how  it  was   different...  than...  today. Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 15. Findings:  Academic   Performance • Just  one  class  at  LIU  Brooklyn                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society SAFA NON-­‐SAFA CompleMon  Rate 96.9% 76.7% Passing  Rate 91.9% 48% Grade  B  or  be?er 60.7% 30.3% Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 16. Findings:  Professional  Development “This  experience  has  helped  me  trust  my  students.”   Peter  Catapano,  City  Tech “I  have  been  able  to  create  a  research  project  that   mirrors  that  of  the  academic  research  process.” Geoff  Zylstra,  City  Tech “I  have  rethought  how  I  teach  research  [...to  move]   from  breadth  to  depth,  the  general  to  the  specific,  in   order  to  engage  students  in  ‘deep  learning’  based  on   close  readings  and  observaCon.” Deborah  Mutnick,  LIU  Brooklyn                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 17. Why  does  SAFA  work? • High  Impact  EducaConal  PracCces – Work  with  first-­‐year  seminars,  learning  communi>es – Common  intellectual  experiences  (among  a  cohort) – Collabora>ve  assignments  and  projects – Undergraduate  research – Diversity/global  learning – Community-­‐based  learning – See  www.aacu.org/leap/hip.cfm   • Primary  source  instrucCon  should  be  consider  a   HIEP  and  a  core  competency  for  archivists.                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 18. TeachArchives.org Look  at  the  site!                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 19. What  is  SAFA? General  quesCons  about  the  project  or   TeachArchives.org?                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 20. Pedagogy:  Objec#ves  vs.  Goals • Learning  goals  vs.  learning  objecCves – Why  we  came  to  find  the  disCncCon  so  important                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 21. Learning  Goals         • A  statement  that  describes  in  broad  terms   what  a  student  will  learn  from  your  course. – adapted  from  hMp://www.oucom.ohiou.edu/fd/wri#ngobjec#ves.pdf • Knowledge,  skills,  or  astudes                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Pedagogy:  Objec#ves  vs.  Goals Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 22. • Professors’  course  goals  were  ofen  the  same  as   SAFA’s  goals – For  ex: – Improve  student  engagement – Build  a  sense  of  community – Interact  with  neighborhoods                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Pedagogy:  Objec#ves  vs.  Goals Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 23. Learning  ObjecCves           • Statement  in  specific  and  measurable  terms  that   describes  what  the  student  will  know  or  be  able   to  do  as  a  result  of  comple>ng  course  ac>vi>es. – adapted  from  http://www.oucom.ohiou.edu/fd/writingobjectives.pdf • Provide  criteria  for  acceptable  performance;  how   students  will  demonstrate  learning                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Pedagogy:  Objec#ves  vs.  Goals Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 24. Example:  Sara  Haviland’s  goals  vs.  objecCves • GOAL  (broader) – Students  will  learn  the  unique  history  of  the  Civil   Rights  movement  in  the  North. • OBJECTIVE  (specific) – In  their  final  research  paper,  students  will  iden>fy   and  analyze  the  different  issues,  strategies,  and   cons>tuencies  of  the  Civil  Rights  movement  in  the   North,  as  compared  to  the  South.                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Pedagogy:  Objec#ves  vs.  Goals Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 25. • To  learn  more,  see   teacharchives.org/ar>cles/learning-­‐objec>ves                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Pedagogy:  Objec#ves  vs.  Goals Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 26. • Assignment  Design – We  wanted  to  demonstrate  a  wide  range  of   assignment  models – Refined  and  tweaked  over  five  semesters                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Pedagogy:  Assignments Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 27. • Types  of  Assignments  and  Visits – One-­‐off  in-­‐archive  ac>vity – Semester-­‐long,  mul>-­‐visit  structure – Building  a  collabora>ve  resource  as  a  class – Scaffolded  document-­‐to-­‐folder  model – Scholarly  research  paper – Other  scholarly  work  (oral  history,  walking  tour) – Research  for  a  crea>ve  project                                        Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Pedagogy:  Assignments Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 28. • Assignments:  quesCons  to  ask  yourself – How  much  Mme  do  you  have  to  spend  in  the  archives  over   the  course  of  the  semester? – What  knowledge  or  skills  will  your  students  gain  in  the   archives?  What  kind  of  assignment  will  best  manifest  those? – How  important  is  student  collaboraMon  vs.  independent   work?   – Who  are  your  students?  (Majors  vs.  non-­‐majors,  first-­‐years   vs.  advanced  students,  etc.)                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Pedagogy:  Assignments Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 29. • To  see  some  successful  assignments,  see teacharchives.org/exercises/                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Pedagogy:  Assignments Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 30. Pedagogy:  Context • How  to  provide  context  to  students – Our  experience:  not  enough  or  too  much  context – Finding  the  “Goldilocks”  of  context                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 31. Pedagogy:  Context • Kinds  of  Context – Historical – Technical  /  Format • Processes • Paleography – Collec>on  Info   • Provenance  or  donor   • How  organized – What  is  Special  Collec>ons?                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 32. Pedagogy:  Context • Possible  sources   – Secondary  sources   – Other  primary  sources   – Popular  or  experien>al  readings – Finding  aids  or  other  library  descrip>ons – Class  lectures – In-­‐archive  lectures – Other  ideas?                                          Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 33. Pedagogy:  Context • Context:  quesCons  to  ask  yourself – What  knowledge/skills/agtudes  might  your   students  need  to  acquire  before  encountering  the   archives? – If  more  than  one  archives  visit,  what  knowledge  do   you  want  them  to  acquire  between  visits?   – How  can  context  readings  help  them  answer   ques>ons  raised  (and  unanswered)  in  archives? – Will  you  preselect  a  reading,  or  will  students  find   one  themselves?                                        Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 34. • To  learn  more,  see teacharchives.org/ar>cles/providing-­‐context                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Pedagogy:  Context Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 35. Pedagogy:  Document  Selec#on • Document  selecCon:  how  much? – For  first-­‐year  students,  item  level  is  best • Some  experiences  with  providing  folder  from  manuscript   collecMon – Small  number  of  items  for  students • Especially  textual  material – Arc  of  visit  relies  on  the  document(s) • What  is  the  journey  students  will  take? • AnMcipate  piialls  and  challenges • You  do  have  a  reading  in  mind                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 36. • Think  about  your  student’s  first  encounter  with   the  document.  Consider: – physical  size – condi>on  or  handling  needs – length  of  text – legibility  (especially  handwri>ng) – vocabulary – visual  literacy  skills  of  students                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Pedagogy:  Document  Selec#on Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 37. • Also  remember: – How  much  more  contextual  knowledge  you  have – The  feeling  of  overwhelm  in  an  archives • Manageable  vs.  unmanageable                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Pedagogy:  Document  Selec#on Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 38. • To  learn  more,  see   teacharchives.org/ar>cles/document-­‐selec>on                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Pedagogy:  Document  Selec#on Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 39. Pedagogy:  Handouts CreaCng  specific  prompts •    Why  tailoring  your  student’s  interac>on  with   the  documents  is  important                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 40. Pedagogy:  Handouts • Generic  quesCons  can  be  confusing • Date  created  vs.  date  covered • Author/creator • Format • “What  is  the  source,”  “why  was  this  doc  made,”  “who   is  the  audience”  are  actually  difficult  to  answer!                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 41. Pedagogy:  Handouts • Student  prompts/handouts:  why  tailor? • Primary  source  docs  are  infinitely  interpretable  –  but   educators  olen  do  have  a  reading  in  mind • Handouts  should  reflect  your  specific  visit  objec>ves • Tailored  handouts  help  an>cipate  regularized   experience  for  students • Rather  than  an  educator  providing  context  to  students  on  a   piecemeal  basis  (when  floaMng  or  zoning)                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 42. Pedagogy:  Handouts • Designing  prompts/handouts: • Don’t  give  students  too  long  a  handout • Ar>culate  to  students  that  they  should  closely   observe  and  read  the  en>re  document • Consider  including  context  or  other  sources  in  the   handout • Examples  in  your  folder                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 43. • To  learn  more,  see teacharchives.org/ar>cles/crea>ng-­‐handouts                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Pedagogy:  Context Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 44. Pedagogy:  Facilita#on FacilitaCng  an  effecCve  visit   – Thinking  deeply  about  logis>cs  makes  for  a  beoer   pedagogical  experience                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 45. Pedagogy:  Facilita#on FacilitaCng  an  effecCve  visit:  plan  ahead   – Overbudget  >me  in  your  agenda • When  to  arrive  and  leave • Don’t  forget  intros  and  wrap-­‐ups • It  takes  students  a  while  to  physically  move   – Groups  allow  for  discussion,  collabora>on,   community  building • But  consider  the  room,  the  size  of  the  docs,  how  long – What  tools  are  needed? – Spell  out  roles  of  faculty  and  staff                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 46. • To  learn  more,  see teacharchives.org/ar>cles/logis>cs                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Pedagogy:  Facilita#on Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 47. Pedagogy:  Wrap  Ups Plan  an  effecCve  wrap  up – Planning  olen  overlooked  by  Brooklyn  faculty – Consider  a  way  for  the  en>re  class  to  reconvene  and   share – You  can  connect  the  “micro”  (document)  back  to  the   “macro”  (course  content) – See  one  great  idea  at  teacharchives.org/exercises/ impromptu-­‐speeches                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 48. Pedagogy:  Wrap  Ups Wrap  ups:  what  to  do – Think  about  logis>cs  again • Change  it  up,  make  sure  they  can  see/hear  each  other – Facilitate  community  interac>on  –  students  speaking   to  each  other,  not  you – Ask  hard  ques>ons!  Demand  a  lot  from  your  students – Consider  shaping  wrap  up  around  a  “takeaway” • Course  goal  or  objecMve,  contemporary  theme,  personal   reacMon,  etc.                                        Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 49. Pedagogy:  Post-­‐visit Afer  the  visit – Give  clear  instruc>ons  on  follow  up  assignments   • What  do  students  do  with  in-­‐archives  handout? • Consider  assigning  a  visit  reflecMon • Relate  the  visit  back  to  larger  assignment? – Clarify  how/whether  they  should  come  back  to   archives  independently • Enlist  staff  member  for  help • Our  experiences:  don’t  make  it  opMonal                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 50. • To  learn  more,  see teacharchives.org/ar>cles/wrap-­‐up                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Pedagogy:  Wrap  Ups Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 51. Pedagogy QuesCons?  Thoughts?                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 52. LUNCH  BREAK!   • Next  session  at  2:00  pm • Meet  back  here,  then  to  Special  CollecCons                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 53. Class  Visits:  Our  Experience • SAFA  Brooklyn  in  a  nutshell – 1  –  3  visits  is  best  (we  had  1  -­‐  7) – Anywhere  from  <10  –  40+  students  in  aoendance – Faculty  pre-­‐select  docs  with  staff  help,  requested  3   weeks  ahead  of  >me – Staff  pull,  prep,  cite,  assess  copyright,  set  up  docs – Staff  greet  class;  review  care/handling;  occasionally   lecture;  co-­‐facilitate  exercise  &  wrap-­‐up                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 54. Class  Visits:  SeXng  Up • Room  setup:  the  “SAFA”  model – Tweaked  over  five  semesters – Sta>ons  and  groupings • Rotate  or  not?  Timing? • Even  groupings   • Siong  at  table  or  standing  with  clipboards? – Logis>cs • Remember  size,  condiMon,  other  layout  issues   – Independent  or  group  work? • Small  groups  of  3  -­‐  4  students  are  ideal                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 55. Class  Visits:  Care  &  Handling How  to  teach  care  and  handling – Not  puni>ve,  stress  universality – Policies  vary,  but  see  our  example  guidelines • Have  students  read  aloud • Ask,  “why?”  or,  “security  or  preservaMon?” – In  folders  and  online  at   teacharchives.org/ar>cles/care-­‐and-­‐handling • What  is  an  archives/historical  society? – Pre-­‐visit  experiment                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 56. Class  Visits:  Facilita#on FacilitaCng  an  effecCve  visit:  in  the  archives – Make  introduc>ons  both  clear  and  enthusias>c – Think  about  logis>cs • where  to  sit  or  stand,  tables  vs.  clipboards,  acousMcs – How  available  will  you  be  to  students? • FloaMng  vs.  zoning • Hang  back  or  hands-­‐on? • What  context  provided  as-­‐needed? • If  you  give  one  group  a  hint,  tell  the  whole  class                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 57. Class  Visits • While  in  Special  CollecCons,  consider: – Individual  document  choices? – How  would  you  stage  these? • Think  about  parameters – Number  of  students – Time  available,  number  of  visits – Course,  brief  goals/visit  objec>ves                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 58. Class  Visits GO  TO  SPECIAL  COLLECTIONS                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 59. Discuss:  Collabora#on We  found  library  faculty  bring  important pedagogical/insCtuConal  skill  sets  –  use  them! – Content  knowledge – History  and  theory  of  archives/collec>ons – Teaching  experience  in  archives  segng – Extensive  doc  analysis  skills – Extensive  logis>cal  experience                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 60. Discuss:  Collabora#on What  do  you  hope  to  gain  from  collabora>ng? What  has  been  successful  or  challenging  in  the  past? What  do  you  need  help  with? What  needs  to  be  clarified  about  who  does  what?  Or   about  how  things  will  work?                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 61. Tools  for  Research IdenCfy  your  research  resources • Finding  aids,  subject  guides,  digital  sources,  and   more • Library  faculty  or  other  professors  teaching   similar  topics/collec>ons • Resources  at  UVM  and  beyond?                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 62. Discuss:  Research Researching  as  a  teacher  –  not  a  scholar • Iden>fying  teaching  docs  very  different  than   iden>fying  docs  for  scholarly  research – Not  looking  for  everything  –  just  one  effec>ve   teaching  document – Do  you  want  a  representa>ve  document  or  an  outlier   document?                                        Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 63. Planning:  Your  Ideas Let’s  workshop  and  discuss  your  specific   scheduling  and  logisCcs  concerns.                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14
  • 64. Wrap  Up Group-­‐determined  quesCons  and  discussion.                                      Students  and  Faculty  in  the  Archives  ●  Brooklyn  Historical  Society Tuesday, May 6, 14

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