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Introducing TeachArchives.org
New-York Historical Society
May 6, 2014
Introductions
Julie Golia, PhD
Historian
TeachArchives.org co-founder and editor
Robin M. Katz, MLIS
Archivist
TeachArchiv...
Introductions
• Your vitals (name, position)
• Your experience teaching with primary
sources
• Successes and challenges?
S...
What is TeachArchives.org?
Innovative educational website offering a
tailored, hands-on approach to modeling
document anal...
What is TeachArchives.org?
Result of Students and Faculty in the Archives
– 3-year, postsecondary education program at Bro...
What is TeachArchives.org?
Beginners need to be taught document
analysis
Our teaching philosophy
– Specific learning objec...
What is TeachArchives.org?
Our Findings
– Independent evaluators have found that SAFA
students are more engaged, perform b...
What is TeachArchives.org?
Resources available on TeachArchives.org
– Innovative teaching philosophy
– Best practices for ...
TeachArchives.org:
Pedagogy
Museum educators, librarians and archivists
are vital resources for instructors of all
backgro...
Pedagogy: Objectives vs.
Goals
Learning goals vs. learning objectives
– Why we came to find the distinction so important
S...
Learning Goal: a statement that describes in
broad terms what a student will learn from
your course.
– adapted from http:/...
Learning Objectives
• Statement in specific and measurable terms that
describes what the student will know or be able
to d...
• Example: one history prof’s goals vs.
objectives
• GOAL (broader)
– Students will learn the unique history of the Civil
...
Consider requiring visit objectives from
instructors visiting N-YHS
Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Histor...
To learn more, see
teacharchives.org/articles/learning-objectives
Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historic...
Pedagogy: Document
Selection
Document selection: how much?
– For first-year students, item level is best
– Small number of...
As stewards of N-YHS collections, push
instructors to consider the student’s
encounter with docs:
– physical size
– condit...
Also remember:
– How much more contextual knowledge you and the
instructor have than the students
– The feeling of overwhe...
To learn more, see
teacharchives.org/articles/document-selection
Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historica...
Pedagogy: Context
Work with instructors to plan how to provide
context to students
– Our experience: not enough or too muc...
Pedagogy: Context
Kinds of context students might need
– Historical
– Technical / Format
• Processes
• Paleography
– Colle...
To learn more, see
teacharchives.org/articles/providing-context
Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical...
Pedagogy: Handouts
Creating specific prompts: why tailoring your
student’s interaction with the documents is
important
– G...
Pedagogy: Handouts
Student prompts/handouts: why tailor?
• Primary source docs are infinitely interpretable – but
educator...
Pedagogy: Handouts
Designing prompts/handouts
• Don’t create too long a handout
• Articulate to students that they should ...
Pedagogy: Handouts
Who creates handouts for students?
– Work with participating instructors to tailor their
handouts to th...
To learn more, see
teacharchives.org/articles/creating-handouts
Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical...
Visiting the Archives: Logistics
Matter!
Good logistics = good pedagogy
– A well planned visit to the archives leads to po...
Class Visits: Our
Experience
What we did at BHS
– 1 – 3 visits is best (we had 1 - 7)
– Anywhere from <10 – 40+ students i...
Class Visits: Setting Up
Room setup: things to think about
– Stations and groupings
• Rotate or not? Timing?
• Even groupi...
Class Visits: Care &
Handling
How to teach care and handling
– Not punitive, stress universality
– Policies vary, but see ...
Class Visits: Facilitation
Plan ahead with instructors
– Push teachers to overbudget time in agenda
• Determine when to ar...
Class Visits: Facilitation
Push instructors to plan an effective wrap up
– Planning often overlooked by teachers
– Suggest...
Class Visits: Follow up
Staff and instructors should clarify how/whether
students should come back to archives
independent...
To learn more, see:
teacharchives.org/articles/logistics
teacharchives.org/articles/wrap-up
Students and Faculty in the Ar...
Conclusion: Collaboration
Librarians and archivists, museum educators,
and other institutional staff bring essential
exper...
Conclusion: Let’s Discuss
Questions? Concerns? Experiences and
challenges to share?
Students and Faculty in the Archives ●...
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Introducing TeachArchives.org

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"Introducing TeachArchives.org." SAFA dissemination presentation. New-York Historical Society. New York, NY. May 5, 2014.

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Transcript of "Introducing TeachArchives.org"

  1. 1. Introducing TeachArchives.org New-York Historical Society May 6, 2014
  2. 2. Introductions Julie Golia, PhD Historian TeachArchives.org co-founder and editor Robin M. Katz, MLIS Archivist TeachArchives.org co-founder and editor Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society
  3. 3. Introductions • Your vitals (name, position) • Your experience teaching with primary sources • Successes and challenges? Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society
  4. 4. What is TeachArchives.org? Innovative educational website offering a tailored, hands-on approach to modeling document analysis skills for students – Innovative teaching philosophy – Best practices for teaching in the archives – Success stories – Classroom-tested sample exercises – Project documentation Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society
  5. 5. What is TeachArchives.org? Result of Students and Faculty in the Archives – 3-year, postsecondary education program at Brooklyn Historical Society – Used primary sources to teach document analysis, information literacy, and critical thinking skills in first- year undergraduates – 19 partner faculty at 3 schools – 1,100 individual students – 100+ class visits to BHS’s archives Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society
  6. 6. What is TeachArchives.org? Beginners need to be taught document analysis Our teaching philosophy – Specific learning objectives – Individual documents • The fewer the better! – Tailored small-group activities – Directed, specific prompts • Ex: “Why did Henry Ward Beecher write this letter?” • Not “Who is the creator? What type of doc is this?” Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society
  7. 7. What is TeachArchives.org? Our Findings – Independent evaluators have found that SAFA students are more engaged, perform better, and - in some cases - have higher retention rates than their peers. – Findings summarized on TeachArchives.org Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society
  8. 8. What is TeachArchives.org? Resources available on TeachArchives.org – Innovative teaching philosophy – Best practices for teaching in the archives – Success stories – Classroom-tested sample exercises – Project documentation Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society
  9. 9. TeachArchives.org: Pedagogy Museum educators, librarians and archivists are vital resources for instructors of all backgrounds Take a central role in planning the archives visit before, during, and after the visit Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society
  10. 10. Pedagogy: Objectives vs. Goals Learning goals vs. learning objectives – Why we came to find the distinction so important Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society
  11. 11. Learning Goal: a statement that describes in broad terms what a student will learn from your course. – adapted from http://www.oucom.ohiou.edu/fd/writingobjectives.pdf Professors’ course goals are often universal – For ex: improve student engagement, build a sense of community Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society Pedagogy: Objectives vs. Goals
  12. 12. Learning Objectives • Statement in specific and measurable terms that describes what the student will know or be able to do as a result of completing course activities. – adapted from http://www.oucom.ohiou.edu/fd/writingobjectives.pdf Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society Pedagogy: Objectives vs. Goals
  13. 13. • Example: one history prof’s goals vs. objectives • GOAL (broader) – Students will learn the unique history of the Civil Rights movement in the North. • OBJECTIVE (specific) – In their final research paper, students will identify and analyze the different issues, strategies, and constituencies of the Civil Rights movement in the North, as compared to the South.Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society Pedagogy: Objectives vs. Goals
  14. 14. Consider requiring visit objectives from instructors visiting N-YHS Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society Pedagogy: Objectives vs. Goals
  15. 15. To learn more, see teacharchives.org/articles/learning-objectives Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society Pedagogy: Objectives vs. Goals
  16. 16. Pedagogy: Document Selection Document selection: how much? – For first-year students, item level is best – Small number of items for students • Especially textual material – Consider student interaction from beginning to end • What is the journey students will take? • Anticipate pitfalls and challenges – Instructors need to be reminded: less is more! Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society
  17. 17. As stewards of N-YHS collections, push instructors to consider the student’s encounter with docs: – physical size – condition or handling needs – length of text – legibility (especially handwriting) – vocabulary – visual literacy skills of students Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society Pedagogy: Document Selection
  18. 18. Also remember: – How much more contextual knowledge you and the instructor have than the students – The feeling of overwhelm in an archives • Manageable vs. unmanageable Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society Pedagogy: Document Selection
  19. 19. To learn more, see teacharchives.org/articles/document-selection Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society Pedagogy: Document Selection
  20. 20. Pedagogy: Context Work with instructors to plan how to provide context to students – Our experience: not enough or too much context – What context to provide is directly related to visit objectives Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society
  21. 21. Pedagogy: Context Kinds of context students might need – Historical – Technical / Format • Processes • Paleography – Collection Info • Provenance or donor • How organized – What is a historical society/archives? Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society
  22. 22. To learn more, see teacharchives.org/articles/providing-context Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society Pedagogy: Context
  23. 23. Pedagogy: Handouts Creating specific prompts: why tailoring your student’s interaction with the documents is important – Generic questions like “what is this document,” “who is the creator” can actually confuse students, inhibit learning Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society
  24. 24. Pedagogy: Handouts Student prompts/handouts: why tailor? • Primary source docs are infinitely interpretable – but educators often do have a reading in mind • Handouts should reflect specific visit objectives • Tailored handouts help anticipate regularized experience for students • Rather than a facilitator providing context to students on a piecemeal basis Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society
  25. 25. Pedagogy: Handouts Designing prompts/handouts • Don’t create too long a handout • Articulate to students that they should closely observe and read the entire document • Consider including context or other sources in the handout Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society
  26. 26. Pedagogy: Handouts Who creates handouts for students? – Work with participating instructors to tailor their handouts to their specific learning objectives – Consider creating in-house handouts that teachers can use or adapt Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society
  27. 27. To learn more, see teacharchives.org/articles/creating-handouts Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society Pedagogy: Handouts
  28. 28. Visiting the Archives: Logistics Matter! Good logistics = good pedagogy – A well planned visit to the archives leads to positive learning experience; a visit that is not thought- through often creates the opposite. – As educators and stewards of the collections at your institution, you are the experts on the logistics of N-YHS – Guide instructors through a series of questions that will make or break a class visit Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society
  29. 29. Class Visits: Our Experience What we did at BHS – 1 – 3 visits is best (we had 1 - 7) – Anywhere from <10 – 40+ students in attendance – Faculty pre-select docs with staff help, requested 3 weeks ahead of time – Staff pull, prep, cite, assess copyright, set up docs – Staff greet class; review care/handling; occasionally lecture; co-facilitate exercise & wrap-up Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society
  30. 30. Class Visits: Setting Up Room setup: things to think about – Stations and groupings • Rotate or not? Timing? • Even groupings • Sitting at table or standing with clipboards? – Logistics • Remember size, condition, other layout issues – Independent or group work? • Small groups of 3 - 4 students are ideal – Tweak each time you teach Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society
  31. 31. Class Visits: Care & Handling How to teach care and handling – Not punitive, stress universality – Policies vary, but see our example guidelines • Have students read aloud • Ask, “why?” or, “security or preservation?” • Online at teacharchives.org/articles/care-and-handling – What is an archives/historical society? – Pre-visit experiment Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society
  32. 32. Class Visits: Facilitation Plan ahead with instructors – Push teachers to overbudget time in agenda • Determine when to arrive and leave • Don’t forget intros and wrap-ups • It takes students a while to physically move – Groups allow for discussion, collaboration, community building • But consider the room, the size of the docs, how long – What tools are needed? – Spell out roles of faculty and staff Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society
  33. 33. Class Visits: Facilitation Push instructors to plan an effective wrap up – Planning often overlooked by teachers – Suggest ways entire class can reconvene and share • Think about logistics again – move students to a place where they can see and hear each other • See one great idea at teacharchives.org/exercises/impromptu-speeches – Get involved – ask hard questions! Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society
  34. 34. Class Visits: Follow up Staff and instructors should clarify how/whether students should come back to archives independently after the group visit – Our experiences: don’t make it optional – Make sure there’s a clear objective for students to return – Make sure reference staff is prepared Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society
  35. 35. To learn more, see: teacharchives.org/articles/logistics teacharchives.org/articles/wrap-up Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society Class Visits
  36. 36. Conclusion: Collaboration Librarians and archivists, museum educators, and other institutional staff bring essential expertise – Content knowledge – History and theory of archives/collections – Teaching experience in archives setting – Extensive doc analysis skills – Extensive logistical experience You should be partners in shaping in-archives curricula!Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society
  37. 37. Conclusion: Let’s Discuss Questions? Concerns? Experiences and challenges to share? Students and Faculty in the Archives ● Brooklyn Historical Society
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