Exhibit Tags: Kelmscott Press Collection, Cleveland Museum of Art Ingalls Library
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Exhibit Tags: Kelmscott Press Collection, Cleveland Museum of Art Ingalls Library

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As part of my masters practicum at the Cleveland Museum of Art, I created an exhibit on the Ingall’s Library’s nearly full run of Kelmscott Press publications. ...

As part of my masters practicum at the Cleveland Museum of Art, I created an exhibit on the Ingall’s Library’s nearly full run of Kelmscott Press publications.

Katz, Robin M. “The Cleveland Museum of Art’s Kelmscott Press Collection.” Ingalls Library, Cleveland Museum of Art. 2009. Modular exhibit-in-a-box was designed to be re-used as needed.

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  • 1. William Morris The Story of the Glittering Plain Dated 4 April, Issued 8 May 1891 Quarto, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (1) paper, Golden type; 200 paper copies, 6 on vellum William Morris The Story of the Glittering Plain, which has also been called the Land of the Living Men or the Acre of the Undying Dated 13 January, Issued 17 February 1894 Large quarto, vellum binding, Batchelor Perch paper, Troy type with Chaucer; 250 paper copies, 7 on vellum William Morris was so eager to start his “typographical adventure” that he printed the Kelmscott Press’ first title in 1891 before Walter Crane’s slated illustrations were even completed. Morris had originally planned on printing only twenty copies for friends, but quickly sold 180 for-sale copies after an announcement in Athenaeum on 4 April 1891. The autographed message inside the Ingalls Library’s copy reveals it was originally a gift from editor F. S. Ellis to his daughter. This first book sets the tone for what will be a remarkably consistent Press aesthetic, even though the leather ties are unique and many of the trademark Kelmscott features had yet to be introduced. Twenty-three Crane pictures were eventually engraved by A. Leverett for the 1894 edition, making The Glittering Plain the only Kelmscott title printed twice. All of Morris’ borders and six of his seven frames are unique to the reprint; they were engraved by W. H. Hooper. Kelmscott Publication Nos. 1 and 22 of 53
  • 2. William Morris Poems by the Way Dated 24 September, Issued 20 October 1891 Quarto, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (1) paper, Golden type; 300 paper copies, 13 on vellum Pre-Raphaelite painter Charles Fairfax Murray helped Morris compile this collection of fugitive pieces. The poems were originally published in periodicals between 1868-1889 except for “Goldilocks & Goldilocks.” Morris composed this poem so the volume would meet his minimum idea of a publishable length. This is the first Kelmscott title to appear in two colors, with rubrication reminiscent of medieval manuscripts. Press Secretary Sydney Cockerell describes a failed attempt to stain the vellum covers of Poems by the Way red, yellow, indigo and dark green. The first Kelmscott printer’s mark appears on the colophon, in keeping with convention; its appearance at the end of the table of contents is, however, a bit unusual. Scholar William Peterson speculates that Morris was “apparently so pleased with his new printer’s mark that he used it twice.” Kelmscott Publication No. 2 of 53
  • 3. Wilfrid Scawen Blunt The Love-Lyrics and Songs of Proteus Dated 26 January, Issued 27 February 1892 Quarto, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (1) paper, Golden type; 300 paper copies, none on vellum Originally planned as a reprint of two of Blunt’s earlier anthologies, Morris urged the author to add a new poem. “Natalia’s Resurrection” is suggestive of Blunt’s affair with Margaret Talbot, the wife of the Military Secretary at the British Embassy in Paris. After receiving what he described as a “wild letter” from Talbot, Blunt decided to omit the poem despite claiming in his diary that it “had nothing really to do with her.” Scholar John Walsdorf located a copy inscribed: To Most Dear Margaret this book, which was made beautiful for her, is given Paris May 1, 1892, Wilfrid Scawen Blunt. Morris’ wife also had an affair with Blunt. According to scholar William Peterson, Janey Morris “sent detailed criticisms” and proofed the whole book. She was not known to have edited any other Kelmscott title. Kelmscott Publication No. 3 of 53
  • 4. John Ruskin The Nature of Gothic: A Chapter of the Stones of Venice Dated 15 February, Issued 22 March 1892 Quarto, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (1) paper, Golden type; 500 paper copies, none on vellum As an art critic and social theorist, John Ruskin heavily influenced Morris and the Pre-Raphaelites. He rejected Classicism and praised Gothic medievalism, articulating a moralism shared by Morris. Ruskin emphasized the methodology of direct observation, the representation of truth, and the need for authentic craftsmanship in the face of standardizing industrialization. This chapter from Stones of Venice (1851) was first published separately by philologist and Christian Socialist F. J. Furnivall for the opening of the London Working Man’s College in 1854. The line block diagrams used in Ruskin’s architectural study are atypical for a Kelmscott publication. Kelmscott Publication No. 4 of 53
  • 5. William Morris The Defence of Guenevere, and other poems Dated 2 April, Issued 18 May 1892 Quarto, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (1) paper, Golden type; 300 paper copies, 10 on vellum This is the only Kelmscott publication with a title inscribed by hand; the calligraphy along the spine of this book was done by Kelmscott editor F. S. Ellis’ son. Herbert Ellis was a partner at Withall & Ellis, Architects and Surveyors. Kelmscott Publication No. 5 of 53
  • 6. William Morris A Dream of John Ball; and, a King’s Lesson Dated 2 April, Issued 18 May 1892 Quarto, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (1) paper, Golden type; 300 paper copies, 11 on vellum John Ball (circa 1338-1381) was an English priest who spread the doctrines of reformer John Wycliffe (circa 1320-1384) and who encouraged rioters during the 1831 peasants revolt known as Wat Tyler’s Rebellion. He was executed shortly after the riot. In this book, Morris envisions a socialist utopia in England based on a dream of John Ball. John Ball first appeared serially in 1887 in the Commonweal, the organ of Morris’ breakaway Socialist League. This version’s frontispiece was engraved by W. H. Hooper after being redrawn from the one by Edward Burne-Jones in the 1888 monograph edition of this title. Kelmscott Publication No. 6 of 53
  • 7. Jacobus de Voragine The Golden Legend Dated 12 September, Issued 3 November 1892 Translated by William Caxton, Edited by F. S. Ellis Quarto, quarter-Holland cloth binding with blue paper on boards, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Golden type 500 paper copies, none on vellum This hagiography was meant to be the first book of the Press, but the original paper delivery was not sized correctly. Due to this delay and the sheer length of the three volumes, a 1959 Duschnes catalog reveals the work was coined “The Interminable” because it was “so long in press.” A medieval bestseller among both elite clergy and the vernacular- reading public, this thirteenth century collection of lives of the saints was one of the first books printed in English by William Caxton in 1483. For this edition, Ellis’ daughter Phyllis transcribed Caxton’s first edition from the Cambridge University library. The respected London book dealer Bernard Quaritch agreed to publish 250 copies at his own expense if Morris and Ellis worked in exchange for 12 copies each. Morris maintained complete artistic control over the project, but this publishing venture saw the first of many misunderstandings between Morris and the bookseller: Quaritch raised prices, the trade did not push the book, and many copies remained on Quaritch’s hands. Within a year, Morris started self-publishing. This publication boasts the first woodcut title page designed by Morris. The wood engraved illustrations are by Edwards Burne-Jones. Friends of the Press attended a book launch celebration dinner including Christian Socialist F. J. Furnivall, bibliographer Edward Gordon Duff, scholar-librarian Richard Garnett, fitness advocate William Blaikie, Pre- Raphaelite author W. M. Rosetti, and engraver Emery Walker. Kelmscott Publication No. 7 of 53
  • 8. Raoul Lefèvre The Recuyell of the Historyes of Troye Dated 14 October, Issued 24 November 1892 Translated by William Caxton, Edited by H. Halliday Sparling Quarto, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Troy type with Chaucer; 300 paper copies, 5 on vellum This courtly romance was the first book printed in English by William Caxton and was a favorite of William Morris’. For the Kelmscott edition, Morris designed many new initials and ornaments. It is the first publication in the black letter Troy type, as well as the first to use the smaller Chaucer type. Kelmscott Publication No. 8 of 53
  • 9. J. W. Mackail Biblia Innocentium: Being the Story of God’s Chosen People before the Coming of Our Lord Jesus Christ upon Earth, written anew for children Dated 22 October, Issued 9 December 1892 Octavo, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Golden type; 200 paper copies, none on vellum This is the first octavo by Kelmscott Press. It was sold by Reeves & Turner, although this information seems to have been inadvertently omitted from the colophon. Mackail was Burne-Jones’ son-in-law and the first biographer of Morris. He was also a socialist, a Virgil scholar, a professor of poetry at Oxford, and president of the British Academy. Kelmscott Publication No. 9 of 53
  • 10. The History of Reynard the Foxe Dated 15 December 1892, Issued 25 January 1893 Translated by William Caxton, Edited by H. Halliday Sparling Quarto, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Troy type with Chaucer; 300 paper copies, 10 on vellum This edition is reprinted from William Caxton’s 1481 printing of the Dutch medieval beast epic. In the Early English Text Society edition of Reynard (1970) editor N. F. Blake says the Kelmscott version “is unreliable and the punctuation in it has been modernised.” Kelmscott Publication No. 10 of 53
  • 11. William Shakespeare The Poems of William Shakespeare, Printed After the Original Copies of Venus and Adonia, 1593. The Rape of Lucrece, 1594. Sonnets, 1609. The Lover’s Complaint. Dated 17 January, Issued 13 February 1893 Edited by F. S. Ellis Octavo, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Golden type; 500 paper copies, 10 on vellum This volume was one of the most in-demand books ever produced by Kelmscott Press. In 1898, Sydney Cockerell describes it as “one of the rare books issued from the Press because of its popularity.” This popularity was apparently earned despite the text’s scholarly flaws. According to Kelmscott scholar William S. Peterson, Ellis later wrote that his friend and fellow man of letters F. J. Furnivall has been taking me roundly to task for some crimes committed in the Shakespeare’s Poems – so much that I am thinking of imprinting it yet once again. Kelmscott Publication No. 11 of 53
  • 12. William Morris News from Nowhere: or, An Epoch of Rest, Being Some Chapters from a Utopian Romance. Issued 24 March 1893 Edited by F. S. Ellis Octavo, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Golden type; 300 paper copies, 10 on vellum According to Philip C. Duschnes, Morris’ utopian novel was written as “an answer to Bellamy’s Looking Backward which Morris considered an indictment of socialism.” The frontispiece by C. M. Gere is of Kelmscott Manor, the Morris’ Oxfordshire home from which the Press took its name. The text to this book was printed before the eleventh publication, the Shakespeare, yet its release was delayed waiting for the image of the house. The frontispiece was engraved by W. H. Hooper. Kelmscott Publication No. 12 of 53
  • 13. Ramon Llull The Order of Chivalry Dated 10 November 1892, Issued 12 April 1893 Translated by William Caxton, Edited by F. S. Ellis & L’Ordene de Chevalrie Dated 24 February 1891, Issued 12 April 1893 Translated by William Morris Quarto (last section octavo), vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (1) and (2) papers, Chaucer type 225 paper copies, 10 on vellum This reprint of the 1484 Caxton edition is the first Kelmscott book printed in Chaucer type. The French poem and its translation were added as an afterthought, hence the odd format. Ellis originally translated the poem into prose, but Morris decided to use his own verse translation instead. Kelmscott Publication No. 13 of 53
  • 14. George Cavendish The Life of Thomas Wolsey, Cardinal, Archbishop of York Dated 30 March, Issued 30 May 1893 Edited by F. S. Ellis Octavo, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Golden type; 250 paper copies, 6 on vellum This is one of several Kelmscott volumes which, despite its unparalleled technical and artistic merits, has been questioned on scholarly grounds. Richard S. Sylvester, the editor of a modern scholarly edition, insists the Press’ version is “shot through with errors.” Kelmscott Publication No. 14 of 53
  • 15. William of Tyre The History of Godefrey of Bologne and the conquest of Ierusalem Dated 27 April, Issued 24 May 1893 Edited by H. Halliday Sparling Translated by William Caxton Large quarto, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Troy type with Chaucer 300 paper copies, 6 on vellum This book is the fifth and last of the series of William Caxton’s texts which were reprinted by the Kelmscott Press. Caxton’s 1681 edition was based on the original Historia rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum or A History of Deeds Done Beyond the Sea. Morris called the book “a very serious piece of history,” which is echoed by Philip C. Duschnes: This work is double interesting as a record of the Crusades and the formation of the short-lived kingdoms in the East. It shows medieval chivalry as it actually was – not as represented by poets and storytellers. The highly decorative edition features many new ornaments and initials, as well as a new printer’s mark designed especially for this book. It was the first book published and sold at Kelmscott Press. This annoyed the noted London bookseller Bernard Quaritch, who felt that in his desire for all of the profits, Morris “will be a loser by it, but… be a nuisance to me on account of the Chaucer” which he was contracted to publish. He was correct; Godefrey did not succeed and Jane Morris eventually donated the remaining copies to public libraries. Kelmscott Publication No. 15 of 53
  • 16. Thomas More Utopia Dated 4 August, Issued 8 September 1893 Edited by F. S. Ellis Octavo, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Chaucer type 300 paper copies, 8 on vellum The Ingalls Library’s copy of this book contains several interesting autographs. The first, which appears on the front free end paper, is an 1893 note in Ellis’ hand presenting the copy to the philologist and Christian Socialist F. J. Furnivall. Furnivall then gave the book to a different friend in 1896 and included a second inscription below Ellis’. Just under the colophon, a small slip of paper is tipped in. It is autographed in Ellis’ hand and reads: This I cannot help feeling vexed at my name appearing as editor opposite a palpable misprint of the first printers’ name. I did correct it, but my proof was lost and the misprint left! The printer’s name appears as “Weale” when it should have been “Vele.” The library’s copy, with its unique autographs, is mentioned in William Peterson’s bibliography on the Press as well as in a Sotheby’s catalogue dated 18 December 1919. Kelmscott Publication No. 16 of 53
  • 17. Alfred Tennyson Maud, a Monodrama Dated 27 April, Issued 24 May 1893 Edited by H. Halliday Sparling Translated by William Caxton Octavo, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Golden type 500 paper copies, 5 on vellum These borders were designed especially for this book and were later used in the Keats and The Sundering Flood. The title page, which H. Halliday Sparling called “one of Morris’ loveliest,” was the first woodcut title in a Kelmscott octavo. Morris owned Tennyson’s Poems, In Memorium, Maud and The Princess. This edition was printed for Macmillan & Co., and Morris later confessed to W. S. Blunt “I would sooner… have printed them Tennyson’s first volume, which is all I ever cared for in his poems.” Additionally, Morris and Burne-Jones publicly disapproved of Tennyson’s bowdlerization of Le Morte d’Arthur; Tennyson never forgave them for this. Kelmscott Publication No. 17 of 53
  • 18. William Morris Gothic Architecture: A Lecture for the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society Printed October and November 1893 Sextodecimo, quarter-Holland cloth binding with blue paper on boards, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Golden type 1500 paper copies, 45 on vellum This was the only Kelmscott book not printed on the premises. The type was set up at Hammersmith and the book was then printed in public before a crowd at the New Gallery during the Arts and Crafts Exhibition. The first copies were ready on 21 October and two successive printings took place before the end of the Exhibition. Vellum copies sold during the Exhibition for 10 shillings, but the price was later raised to 15. The first issue misspelled “Van Eyk” on page 45 and spelled “guilds” as “gilds” on page 14. The Ingalls Library’s copy is therefore from either the second or third impression. This was the first Kelmscott book printed in sextodecimo format and the four-line initial appeared in this title for the first time. The book contains no printer’s mark. Kelmscott Publication No. 18 of 53
  • 19. William Meinhold Sidonia the Sorceress Issued 1 November 1893 Translated by Francesca Speranza Lady Wilde. Large quarto, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Golden type; 300 paper copies, 10 on vellum The publisher’s announcement, which was accompanied with a specimen page, describes this as an historical Romance, based more or less on fact, concerning the Witch Fever that afflicted Northern Europe during the latter half of the 15th and first half of the 16th centuries. It also calls both of Meinhold’s books “almost faultless reproductions of the life of the past.” The copyediting of this work was hardly faultless, though. In a letter Ellis listed -- just off the top of his head -- seven typos he had later noticed. Lady Wilde, Oscar’s mother, was extremely destitute in the 1890s, so Morris paid her 35 pounds to translate this volume. The book did not sell well, however, and thirty copies were bound in quarter-Holland cloth and donated to British and American libraries. Kelmscott Publication No. 19 of 53
  • 20. Dante Gabriel Rossetti Ballads and Narrative Poems Dated 14 October, Issued November 1893 Octavo, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Golden type; 310 paper copies, 6 on vellum Dante Gabriel Rossetti Sonnets and Lyrical Poems Dated 20 February, Issued 21 April 1894 Octavo, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Golden type; 310 paper copies, 6 on vellum William Michael Rossetti was the literary executor for his brother, who died in 1882. He read these books for the Press, although it was the publisher Ellis & Elvey who contacted William Morris to print the set. Morris wanted to call the first volume Ballads and Tales in Verse, but William Michael changed the title. The question arose whether the sonnet “Nuptial Sleep” should be restored to The Houses of Life. Dante Gabriel was prompted to retract the poem in 1872 due to Robert Buchanan’s criticism. William Michael did not restore in until 1904 because he felt his brother’s “own decision commands mine.” William Morris’ wife Jane had a long-term affair with Dante Gabriel, who was a close friend of the printer. The lease on the Oxfordshire summer home and namesake of the Press, Kelmscott Manor, was signed by both Rossetti and Morris. While Morris was traveling, Jane and Rossetti lived in the manor with the Morris daughters. Kelmscott Publication Nos. 20 and 20a of 53
  • 21. Of King Florus and the Fair Jehane Dated 16, Issued 28 December 1893 Translated by William Morris Sextodecimo, quarter-Holland cloth binding with blue paper on boards, Batchelor Perch paper, Chaucer type 350 paper copies, 15 on vellum This thirteenth century French story is uniform with Of the Friendship of Amis and Amile and The Tale of Emperor Coustans and of Over Sea. They were all taken from the 1865 edition of Nouvelles françoises en prose du XIIe siėcle. They were announced as “French Tales” in an 1893 list. Morris’ translations were published by George Allen as Old French Romances Done into English by William Morris in 1896. Allen had wanted to reprint the Kelmscott titles, but Morris did not give him permission to do so. Kelmscott Publication No. 21 of 53
  • 22. Of the Friendship of Amis and Amile Dated 13 March, Issued 4 April 1894 Translated by William Morris Sextodecimo, quarter-Holland cloth binding with blue paper on boards, Batchelor Perch paper, Chaucer type 500 paper copies, 15 on vellum This story, which was incredibly popular in the Middle Ages, was the inspiration for Morris’ poem Amys & Amillion. This poem was mentioned in the announcement for the second volume of The Earthly Paradise, but it was not actually included in the final book. It is uniform with Of King Florus and the Fair Jehane and The Tale of Emperor Coustans and of Over Sea. They were all taken from the 1856 edition of Nouvelles françoises en prose du XIIe siėcle. They were announced as “French Tales” in an 1893 list. Kelmscott Publication No. 23 of 53
  • 23. John Keats The Poems of John Keats Dated 7 March, Issued 8 May 1894 Edited by F. S. Ellis Octavo, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Golden type; 300 paper copies, 7 on vellum In January of 1898, Press Secretary Sydney Cockerell wrote, “This is now the most sought after of all the smaller Kelmscott Press books.” In his 1959 catalog, Philip C. Duschnes declared that “after sixty or more years, we can make the same comment.” Morris owned an 1854 edition of Keats’ Poetical Works, which is now held at Kelmscott Manor, and scholar William Peterson explains that Morris’ “own poetry, as he admitted, shows indebtedness to Keats.” Kelmscott Publication No. 24 of 53
  • 24. Algernon Charles Swinburne Atalanta in Calydon: A Tragedy Dated 4 May, Issued 24 July 1894 Large quarto, vellum binding, Batchelor Perch paper, Troy type with Chaucer and Macmillan Greek type 250 paper copies, 8 on vellum In their student days at Oxford, Morris and Swinburne shared a love of Malory and Arthurian legend. They became mutual admirers of each others work. Atalanta was first published in 1865. This is the only Kelmscott publication to use a typeface not designed by Morris. Selwyn Image, with Emery Walker’s help, designed a Greek type based on manuscripts in the British museum. It was first used in Archer Hind’s edition of Plato’s Phaedo. Morris wrote to Macmillan requesting use of the font, and Macmillan supplied the electrotypes. This book sold out within weeks of publication. Kelmscott Publication No. 25 of 53
  • 25. The Tale of the Emperor of Coustans and of Over the Sea Dated 30 August, Issued 26 September 1894 Translated by William Morris Sextodecimo, quarter-Holland cloth binding with blue paper on boards, Batchelor Perch paper, Chaucer type 525 paper copies, 20 on vellum This book is uniform with Of King Florus and the Fair Jehane and Of the Friendship of Amis and Amile. They were all taken from the 1856 edition of Nouvelles françoises en prose du XIIe siėcle. They were announced as “French Tales” in an 1893 list. The first story in this title was the source of The Man Born to Be King in the Earthly Paradise. Kelmscott Publication No. 26 of 53
  • 26. William Morris The Wood beyond the World Dated 30 May, Issued 16 October 1894 Octavo, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Chaucer type; 250 paper copies, 8 on vellum Morris wrote this specifically for the Kelmscott Press; “hence in the manuscript,” scholar William Peterson observes, “he indicated the position of the decorated initials and leaf ornaments.” The book was issued so long after its printing because Edward Burne- Jones’ frontispiece was delayed. It was engraved on wood by W. Spielmeyer. The borders and half-borders designed by Morris are used for the first time in this publication. Morris received royalties for the first trade edition by Lawrence and Bullen which was published in 1895. A reviewer in The Spectator assumed a Socialist allegory between Capitol and Labor, but Morris responded with a letter to the editor claiming: ...it is meant for a tale pure and simple, with nothing didactic about it. If I have to write or speak on social problems, I always try to be as direct as I possibly can be. Kelmscott Publication No. 27 of 53
  • 27. Sulkhan-Saba Orbeliani The Book of Wisdom and Lies Finished 29 September, Issued 29 October 1894 Translated by Oliver Wardrop Octavo, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Golden type; 250 paper copies, none on vellum As this story originates in Georgia, that country’s arms, which consist of the Holy Coat, are depicted on the woodcut title page. William Morris printed this publication for Bernard Quaritch, the noted London bookseller and publisher. Morris supplied the paper, reproduced the illustration, and set the type from a translator’s manuscript. Quaritch and Wardrop both promised not to interfere with the printing, and Quaritch was pleased with the specimen pages. Morris bought ten copies of the book. Kelmscott Publication No. 28 of 53
  • 28. Percy Bysshe Shelley The Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley Volume I: Issued 29 November 1984 Volume II: Dated 25 March 1895 Volume III: Dated 21 August, Issued 28 October 1895 Edited by F. S. Ellis Octavo, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Golden type; 250 paper copies, 6 on vellum Ellis advised Morris not to print this title because of its length, although Morris decided to do so. The silk ties which typically accompany Kelmscott vellum bindings were left off of the paper copies of this title “as an experiment,” Sydney Cockerell wrote, because “some people don’t care for them.” Those books which were printed on vellum sheets do have ties, however. Kelmscott Publication No. 29 of 53
  • 29. Psalmi penitentiales Dated 15 November, Issued 10 December 1894 Edited by F. S. Ellis Octavo, quarter-Holland cloth binding with blue paper on boards, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Chaucer type 300 paper copies, 12 on vellum The colophon declares that this text is an English rhymed version of the Seven Penitential Psalms found in a manuscript of Horae Beate Mariae Virginis written in Gloucester around the year 1440. The Reverend Professor Walter William Skeat determined that the Kentish dialect of about a century earlier used in the text must have originated from an older manuscript. Ellis and Morris disagreed -- “as usual,” in scholar William Peterson’s opinion -- about editorial decisions on how (or if) to update the English. The Ingalls Library’s copy was given from Ellis to his friend F. J. Furnivall, philologist and a founder of London Working Men’s College. The book is presented to Furnivall by an autograph on the free endpaper which also recounts the editor’s role in encouraging Morris to print this volume. Kelmscott Publication No. 30 of 53
  • 30. Girolamo Savonarola Psalmi penitentiales Dated 30 November, Issued 12 December 1894 Edited by Charles Fairfax Murray Octavo, quarter-Holland cloth binding with blue paper on boards, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Chaucer type 150 paper copies, 6 on vellum This volume was not for sale in the typical way. It was one of only three Kelmscott editions Morris printed for his friends, alongside The Love- Lyrics and Songs of Proteus and Biblica innocentium. Charles Fairfax Murray, who worked for Morris & Co. as an artist and copyist, owned the autographed letter by Savonarola from which this publication was set. Murray edited the printed version himself. He also designed the wood-engraved illustration on the title page, basing it on a sixteenth-century woodcut from Florence. The edition of 150 was the smallest edition of the Press. Despite Murray’s editing, the Italian text has an unusually high number of typographical errors. Kelmscott Publication No. 31 of 53
  • 31. The Tale of Beowulf Dated 10 January, Issued 2 February 1895 Translated by William Morris and A. J. Wyatt Large quarto, vellum binding, Batchelor Perch paper, Troy type with some Chaucer; 150 paper copies, 6 on vellum Morris based his verse translation of the Anglo-Saxon scholar Alred John Wyatt’s 1898 version published by Longmans. Morris said that Beowulf “was the first and the best poem of the English race, [with] no author but the people.” Kelmscott Publication No. 32 of 53
  • 32. Syr Perecyvelle of Gales Dated 16 February, Issued 2 May 1895 Octavo, quarter-Holland binding with blue paper on boards, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Chaucer type 350 paper copies, 8 on vellum This title forms a series together with the Sire Degrevaunt and Syr Ysambrace. They were reprinted from the Camden Society’s 1844 volume edited by James O. Halliwell after the Thornton manuscript which Morris had read while at Oxford. The story of Sir Perceval appears in many medieval manuscripts, and is mentioned by Chaucer in the tale of Sir Thopas. The Ingalls Library’s copy contains an autograph claiming, “This book is from the private stock of Mr. William Morris and was sold to me at my request made when with Mr. Morris at his house...” There is also an autographed letter addressed to the owner and signed by Press Secretary Sydney Cockerell. Kelmscott Publication No. 33 of 53
  • 33. William Morris The Life and Death of Jason, a Poem Dated 25 May, Issued 5 July 1895 Large quarto, vellum binding, Batchelor Perch paper, Troy type with some Chaucer; 290 paper copies, 6 on vellum This poem was immediately successful with general readers and was praised by Algernon Charles Swinburne, John Ruskin, and Henry James. These critics and others have noted that Medea is clearly the heroine over Jason. Jason was first published in 1867 and was revised by Morris for each of the three successive editions, the Kelmscott being the last. Book production was slow as the Press was completing other projects simultaneously, most notably the Chaucer. Kelmscott Publication No. 34 of 53
  • 34. William Morris Child Christopher and Goldilind the Fair Dated 25 July, Issued 25 September 1895 Sextodecimo, quarter-Holland cloth binding with blue paper on boards, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Chaucer type 290 paper copies, 6 on vellum William Morris’ tale turned out to be longer than originally anticipated, so it had to be printed in two volumes. Morris increased the number issued so as to defray production costs. Because the edition size was more than double the usual, Morris promised never to published Child Christopher in a cheaper edition. Kelmscott Publication No. 35 of 53
  • 35. Dante Gabriel Rossetti Hand and Soul Dated 24 October, Issued 12 December 1895 Sextodecimo, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Golden type; 525 paper copies, 21 on vellum This was the only sextodecimo bound in vellum. It is also the only Kelmscott Press book published in America. Kelmscott published 225 paper copies and 10 on vellum for sale in England and 200 paper copies and 11 on vellum for America. The Ingalls Library’s copy is the American edition as the colophon says it was sold by Way & Williams of Chicago. Kelmscott Publication No. 36 of 53
  • 36. Robert Herrick Poems Chosen out of the Work of Robert Herrick Dated 21 November, Issued 6 February 1896 Octavo, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Golden type; 250 paper copies, 8 on vellum William Morris was apparently not always a Herrick fan. Biographer J. W. Mackail reported that Morris said “I like him better than I thought I should: I daresay we shall make a pretty book of it.” Kelmscott Publication No. 37 of 53
  • 37. Samuel Taylor Coleridge Poems Chosen out of the Work of Samuel Taylor Coleridge Dated 5 February, Issued 12 April 1896 Edited by F. S. Ellis Octavo, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Golden type; 300 paper copies, 8 on vellum This is the last book in the series of poetry books by Tennyson, Rossetti, Keats, Shelley and Herrick. Morris was even less a fan of Coleridge than he was of Herrick, writing Coleridge was a muddle-brained metaphysician, who by some strange freak of fortune turned out a few real poems amongst a dreary floor of inanity which was his wont. It is these real poems only that must be selected, or we burden the world another useless book... He chose such poems as “Rime of the Ancient Mariner,” “Christable,” “Kubla Kahn,” and “Love.” Kelmscott Publication No. 38 of 53
  • 38. William Morris The Well at the World’s End Dated 2 March, Issued 4 July 1896 Large quarto, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Chaucer type; 350 paper copies, 8 on vellum Eight woodcuts and six different ornaments between the columns appear in this book for the first time. Morris decided in the spring of 1893 to let Arthur J. Gaskin illustrate this volume, but Morris was unhappy with his work. Gaskin revised the drawings and contributed 19 designs in the end, but Philip Webb agreed that the illustrations were unsatisfactory, and Morris turned to Burne-Jones instead. Kelmscott Publication No. 39 of 53
  • 39. Geoffrey Chaucer The Works of Geoffrey Chaucer, now newly imprinted Dated 8 May, Issued 26 June 1896 Edited by F. S. Ellis Folio, quarter-Holland cloth binding with blue paper on boards, Batchelor Perch paper, Chaucer type with Troy headings 425 paper copies, 13 on vellum The Kelmscott Chaucer was immediately acknowledged as the Press’ “crowning achievement” in an Athenaeum review of October 1896. In fact, scholar William Peterson informs us it was considered the “most ambitious and remarkable” of the Kelmscott volumes even prior to its publication. Reflecting on their work together, illustrator Edward Burne-Jones told William Morris this “was the finest book ever printed.” The Kelmscott Chaucer features 87 woodcut illustrations by Burne- Jones which were engraved by W. H. Hooper. The largest book produced by the Press, it includes an exquisite woodcut title page, 14 large borders, and 18 frames around the illustrations. Morris designed 26 large initial words which were engraved by V. E. Keats, W. H. Hooper, and W. Spielmeyer. Morris died four months after his masterpiece was published. Kelmscott Publication No. 40 of 53
  • 40. William Morris The Earthly Paradise Volume I: Dated 7 May, Issued 24 July 1896 Volume II: Dated 24 June, Issued 17 September 1896 Volume III: Dated 24 August, Issued 5 December 1896 Volume IV: Dated 25 November, Issued 22 January 1897 Volume V: Dated 24 December 1896, Issued 9 March 1897 Volume VI: Finished 18 February, Issued 11 May 1897 [not held at CMA] Volume VII: Finished 17 March, Issued 29 July 1987 Volume VII: Finished 10 June, Issued 27 September 1897 Medium quarto, vellum binding, Batchelor Apple paper, Golden type 225 paper copies, 6 on vellum This multivolume collection contains Morris’ favorite stories from around the world. He died between the release of volumes III and IV; the set was finally completed almost a year after his death. This is the first book printed with the apple watermark. It is the first of a new size for Kelmscott, what Morris called a “sort of mild quarto,” or something between a quarto and octavo. The Ingalls Library is missing volume six of this eight-volume set. Other than this single volume, the library boasts a full run of Kelmscott Press publications. Kelmscott Publication No. 41 of 53
  • 41. Laudes Beatae Mariae Virginis Dated 2 March, Issued 4 July 1896 Edited by Sydney C. Cockerell Large quarto, quarter-Holland binding with blue paper on boards, Batchelor Perch paper, Troy type 250 paper copies, 10 on vellum The Latin poems were taken from a psalter written in England around 1220 CE. The book was based on a manuscript owned by Morris which he called the Nottingham Psalter. After the book was issued, the Reverend E. S. Dequick informed Kelmscott that they were printed in 1579 at Tegernsee and ascribed to Stephen Langton. Subscribers were informed by letter. The book is printed with black, red and blue ink. It is the first of two books to be printed in tricolor at the Kelmscott Press. The other is Love is Enough. Kelmscott Publication No. 42 of 53
  • 42. The Floure and the Leafe, & The Book of Cupid, God of Love, or The Cuckow and the Nightingale Dated 21 August, Issued 2 November 1896 Edited by F. S. Ellis Quarto, quarter-Holland cloth binding with blue paper on boards, Batchelor Apple paper, Troy type with Chaucer 300 paper copies, 10 on vellum The two initial words used in this book were designed for the Kelmscott Chaucer. These poems were commonly attributed to Chaucer, but The Floure and the Leafe was identified as a later poem. The Cuckow and the Nightingale was penned by Sir Thomas Clanvowe around 1405-1410, as the colophon explains. Morris had never read The Cuckow and the Nightingale and was waiting for the book to be in print to do so. The first bound copy arrived at Kelmscott Manor an hour or two before he died on 3 October 1896. Kelmscott Publication No. 43 of 53
  • 43. Edmund Spencer The Shepheardes Calendar: Conteyning Twelve Æglogues, Proprtionable to the Twelve Monethes Dated 14 October, Issued 26 November 1896 Edited by F. S. Ellis Medium quarto, quarter-Holland cloth binding with blue paper on boards, Batchelor Apple paper, Golden type 225 paper copies, 6 on vellum The twelve full page illustrations in this book were designed by Arthur J. Gaskin and printed from process blocks by Walkter & Boutall. The names of the author, editor, and artist were inadvertently omitted from the colophon. Kelmscott Publication No. 44 of 53
  • 44. William Morris The Water of the Wondrous Isles Dated 1 April, Issued 29 July 1897 Large quarto, vellum binding, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Chaucer type with Troy; 250 paper copies, 6 on vellum This is one of the last compositions by Morris. He started it as a poem in 1895, tried to alternate between prose and verse, and finally wrote it in prose as it appears here. The American publishers Longmans wanted to print and copyright its own edition of this title, but the US International Copyright Act of 1891 required two Library of Congress deposits printed in the US and submitted no later than publication elsewhere. Because of its British editio princeps status, Kelmscott’s promise to subscribers and a comparable no-prior-publication rule in Britain, both houses arranged for simultaneous publication. The designs for the initial words were started by Morris but completed by R. Catterson-Smith. Sydney Cockerell’s diary describes the dying Morris’ futile attempt to draw: he “only just managed to black in the spaces, and just rough in the word.” Kelmscott Publication No. 45 of 53
  • 45. Sire Degrevaunt Dated 14 March, Issued 12 November 1897 Edited by F. S. Ellis Octavo, quarter-Holland cloth binding with blue paper on boards, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Chaucer type 350 paper copies, 8 on vellum This title forms a series together with Syr Perecyvelle of Gales and Syr Ysambrace. They were reprinted from the Camden Society’s 1844 volume edited by James O. Halliwell after the Thornton manuscript which Morris had read while at Oxford. This story had long been popular among Morris’ friends. Subjects from this book were painted prior to its publication by Edward Burne-Jones on the walls of The Red House, Upton, Bexley Heath. Kelmscott Publication No. 47 of 53
  • 46. Syr Ysambrace Dated 14 March, Issued 12 November 1897 Edited by F. S. Ellis Octavo, quarter-Holland cloth binding with blue paper on boards, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Chaucer type 350 paper copies, 8 on vellum This is the final title in a series together with Syr Perecyvelle of Gales and Sire Degrevaunt. They were reprinted from the Camden Society’s 1844 volume edited by James O. Halliwell after the Thornton manuscript which Morris had read while at Oxford. Kelmscott Publication No. 48 of 53
  • 47. Some German Woodcuts of the Fifteenth Century Dated 15 December 1897, Issued 6 January 1898 Edited by Sydney J. Cockerell Large quarto, quarter-Holland cloth binding with blue paper on boards, Batchelor Perch paper, Golden type 225 paper copies, 8 on vellum William Morris originally hired the twenty-four year old Sydney Cockerell to catalog his library on a part time basis. Morris envisioned an illustrated catalog of his collection of manuscripts and incunabula. Morris biographer Fiona MacCarthy writes that Cockerell “soon made himself indispensable” and was ultimately made Press Secretary. Although she found him “ambitious and manipulative,” the meticulously detailed diary entries and scores of records left by this “systematic hoarder” are invaluable. Upon his deathbed in 1896, Morris asked Cockerell to continue the Kelmscott Press. Cockerell was “in favor of it ceasing – as otherwise it would fizzle out by degree.” It took one year and a half to complete all projects and close the Press. As the illustrated catalog would have been too expensive to produce, Cockerell published this volume instead. Morris had already selected a representative series of 29 reproductions; the other six were chosen for a Bibliographica article. The process blocks, prepared by Walker & Boutall, are all the same size as the originals. Part of Morris’ article appears as the book’s introduction. Kelmscott Publication No. 49 of 53
  • 48. William Morris The Story of Sigurd the Volsung and the Fall of Niblungs Dated 19 January, Issued 26 February 1898 Edited by Sydney J. Cockerell Small folio, vellum binding, Batchelor Apple paper, Chaucer type 160 paper copies, 6 on vellum The two borders used in this book were among the last Morris designed. In his 1959 catalog, Philip C. Duschnes claims “Morris considered this literary work his masterpiece by which he would be best remembered.” According to Morris scholar Eugene LeMire, however, “the public reception of his book did not match his own estimate of it.” Edward Burne-Jones only agreed to illustrate the book to please Morris. He wrote that he “shan’t like doing it so much as Chaucer” because of the scenery. Upon Morris’ death, they abandoned plans for a fully illustrated folio. Kelmscott Publication No. 50 of 53
  • 49. William Morris The Sundering Flood Dated 19 January, Issued 26 February 1898 Octavo, quarter-Holland cloth binding with blue paper on boards, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Chaucer type 300 paper copies, 10 on vellum This was the last romance by William Morris. He started it in 1894 and completed it from his deathbed in September of 1896 by dictating the final words to his daughter May Morris. She oversaw the book’s publication after his passing. Kelmscott Publication No. 51 of 53
  • 50. William Morris Love is Enough, or the Freeing of Pharamond: A Morality Dated 11 December 1897, Issued 24 March 1898 Large quarto, vellum binding, Batchelor Perch paper, Troy type with Chaucer; 300 paper copies, 8 on vellum Love is Enough was, as scholar Eugene LeMire puts it, “never popular.” The illustration by Edward Burne-Jones which appears on the final page was not created for this edition, one of only two tri-colored books by Kelmscott. It was created as a frontispiece for an illustrated version which Morris had previously abandoned. Kelmscott Publication No. 52 of 53
  • 51. A Note by William Morris on His Aims in Founding the Kelmscott Press Dated 4, Issued 24 March 1898 Octavo, quarter-Holland cloth binding with blue paper on boards, Batchelor Flower (2) paper, Golden, Troy and Chaucer types 525 paper copies, 12 on vellum The introductory essay by Morris was originally written for scholar- collector Carl Edelheim of Philadelphia, who used it for a lecture to the Philobiblon Club of Philadelphia and who published it in Modern Art in the Winter of 1896. Press Secretary Sydney Cockerell wrote his notes on the Kelmscott Press books between 20 October and early December 1897. Although Cockerell kept diligent records, there are some errors in his list. Researchers are instead directed towards William S. Peterson’s definitive bibliography on the Kelmscott Press. Kelmscott Publication No. 53 of 53