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Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)
Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)
Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)
Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)
Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)
Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)
Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)
Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)
Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)
Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)
Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)
Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)
Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)
Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)
Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)
Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)
Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)
Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)
Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)
Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)
Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)
Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)
Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)
Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)
Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)
Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)
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Improving outcomes for young people in Counties Manukau - Carl Crafar (Ministry of Social Development)

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    • 1. Youth Gangs Improving Outcomes for Young People in Counties Manukau Carl Crafar – National Manager Youth Gangs
    • 2. Agenda
      • What happened?
      • What did we do?
      • Where are we at now?
      • Where to from here?
      • Questions and Discussion
    • 3. What happened…
      • Multiple homicides
      • Assaults - Individual and groups
      • Anti Social Behaviour
      • Rape, aggravated robbery and drug-related crimes.
    • 4. What happened …
      • Situation extremely complex/constantly shifting
      • Alcohol and drugs strong aggravating factor
      • Violence often extreme/random - odd pre-determined fight
      • Innocent members of public sometimes attacked for gangs amusement.
    • 5. What did we do…Research
      • Community based participants
      • Social Service agencies, school principals, community representatives
      • Auckland Government Agency staff
      • Police, Ministry of Education, Child, Youth and Family
      • Youth Gang Members
      • Current and former
      • Non Gang Youth.
    • 6. What did we do…Research What is a Youth Gang?
      • Youth – person aged between 10 and 23 years
      • A gang ……..
      • “ A group of youths, often from disadvantaged backgrounds, with a loose structure, a common identifier (colours, a name, hand signals etc), whose activities are not primarily criminal but involve (mostly) petty crimes, and who see themselves as a gang and are identified as such by others in the community (Gilbert, in preparation).”
    • 7. What did we do…Research History of Youth Gangs Youth Gangs identified in New Zealand in 1950s Maori and Pacific Gangs Expand and gain Notoriety as they are Perceived to be Increasingly violent 1970s Rebellious teen Behaviour – Rock ‘n’ roll, alcohol and sexual activity 1950s American-based Hells Angels gang influences Gang development in New Zealand Gang consists of Pakeha 1960s 1980s Gang membership Becomes more long-term And gangs are composed of adults rather than youth Gangs tend to move From territorially Based groups to more Highly organised gangs 1990s
    • 8. What did we do…Research Classifications
      • Wannabes (Not a Youth Gang) Highly informal
      • Territorial Gang – More organised
      • Unaffiliated Criminal Youth Gang – Members are not under an adult gang
      • Affiliated Criminal Youth Gang – is defined by a relationship to an adult gang.
      *Numbers difficult to identify due to the varying definitions used for “youth gang”
    • 9. What did we do… Research Example of Gang Hierarchy BP Black Power JBP Junior Black Power JCB Juvenile Cripsta Boys 17-21 year olds TNS Thugs Not Soldiers 15-17 year olds RYT Ruthless Young Thugs 14-17 year olds
    • 10. What did we do… Research Demographic
      • Young age structure
      • High proportion of Mäori and Pacific peoples
      • Areas of high economic deprivation
      • Urban design and community capability
      • Recreation facilities.
    • 11. What did we do…Research Why do youth join gangs?
      • Family/whänau
      • - Parental disengagement
      • - Stressors arising from financial commitments
      • Lack of engagement with services
      • Parenting skills/role models.
    • 12. What did we do… Research Why do youth join gangs?
      • Peers
      • Provision of a proxy family unit
      • Financial and material gain
      • Alleviate boredom
      • Status
      • Protection
      • Adult gang recruitment/prospecting.
    • 13. What did we do… Research Why do youth join gangs?
      • American “Gangsta”, Hip-Hop, Rap
      • culture features very strongly
      • Coolio (Corner Pocket Crips)
      • Snoop Dogg (Rollin 20’ Cripps)
      • Nate Dogg (Rollin 20’s Cripps)
      • Warren G (Rollin 20’s Cripps)
      • Ice T (Rollin 30’s)
      • Ice Cube (Rollin 60’s Neighbourhood Cripps)
      • New Zealand style developing.
    • 14. What did we do… Research Recruitment Techniques
      • Intimidation, threats, fear, protection
      • Peer pressure
      • Sex, drugs, alcohol, prostitution.
    • 15. What did we do… Established Management Forums
      • Chief Executives’ Forum
        • Ministries of Social Development, Justice, Education, Health and Police
      • Auckland Youth Support Network
        • Initially: MSD, Police, Ministries of Justice, Education, Counties Manukau
        • District Health Board, Te Puni K ö kiri, Ministry of Pacific Island Affairs.
        • - Added: Housing New Zealand, Auckland and Manukau City Councils.
    • 16. What did we do … Action Plan
      • Action plan methodology
      • Crisis – covers young people picked up by Police outside of normal business hours
        • Three Police Youth Action teams – Tolerance and visibility
        • - Three reception centres - short-term placements.
    • 17. What did we do … Action Plan
      • Intervention – high risk recidivist youth offenders
        • Youth Offending Team Coordinator for three teams
        • Six Integrated Case Managers to deal with 150 cases
        • Maori wardens patrolling hotspots
        • Pasifika wardens undertaking community patrols.
        • NZ Police Alcohol Action Plan
        • Evaluation of drug and alcohol services.
    • 18. What did we do … Action Plan
      • Prevention – Children, young people and their families who are at risk of poor outcomes
        • Improved reporting and management of truancy - new electronic enrolment system
        • Expansion of student engagement initiative to further three schools (total will be seven)
        • Expand the availability of Youth Transition Services to Mt. Roskill, Mt. Albert and Avondale
    • 19. What did we do … Action Plan
      • Prevention – Children, young people and their families who are at risk of poor outcomes
        • Police officers in 10 secondary schools
        • 22 youth workers contracted
        • Canvass young people on what they need
        • Parenting programmes.
    • 20. What did we do… Action Plan
      • Prevention – Children, young people and their families who are at risk of poor outcomes
        • Family Start - extended to Papakura and Mangere
        • Social Workers in Schools evaluated and extended to another four schools
        • 10,000 Year Nine students have had a social and health assessment.
    • 21. Where are we at now…
      • Communication strategy developed :
        • Bi-monthly newsletter / Web page
        • Manukau Matters / Agency publications
        • Stakeholder / media management
      • Multi Agency Social Services in Secondary Schools
      • Development of a database
      • Work and Income process
      • Re-defining police list – more targeted
      • Evaluation – end of 2007.
    • 22. Where are we at now… Issues still exist
      • Two main “groups”: Crips (Blue) and Bloods (Red)
      • “ Crip Family” umbrella, generally get along
      • The Bloods - little less organised - starting to see a “Red Army” arrangement
      • Longevity - members hard core criminals
      • Kids being kids
      • Stereotyping – Media
      • Copycat behaviour.
    • 23.
        • Flag - left, left side of trousers rolled up, left shoe untied, hat sideways - left, rings, watches - left, laces missing on left, one glove - left
        • Hand signals with left hand
        • Will not use letter B
        • Will avoid words that have CK (Crip Killer)
        • Refer to Bloods as Slobs
        • Wear sports clothing with affiliation to letter C
        • Have been seen wearing BK Shoes (BK=Blood Killa).
    • 24.
      • Opposite of Crips everything is on right side
      • Flag carried on right side, shoe is untied right side, hat to right, single glove right, trousers rolled up right side
      • Wear red
      • Will not use the letter C. Will replace with the number 3. C=3rd letter in alphabet
      • The first blood gang called PIRU in Central LA any reference to this indicates awareness
      • Refer to crips as crabs.
    • 25. Where to from here…
      • Framework for dealing with Youth gangs nationally
      • Identification
      • Governance
      • Best Practice Model
      • Communication Strategy.
    • 26. Questions and discussion

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