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Link: children of the incarcerated
A quilt system to link children with their loved once incarcerated.

Design: Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman
Parsons The New School Of Design

Working with an expert in the Prison system in New York State students were asked to look at opportunities for the inmates and loved ones of the incarcerated.

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    Link: children of the incarcerated Link: children of the incarcerated Presentation Transcript

    • [link] Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman Parsons The New School Of Design
    • project proposal children of the incarcerated Over half of federal and state prisoners report having children under the age of 18. 35% of these children, the largest demographic with incarcerated parents, are between the ages of 5 and 9. Upon initial arrest, law enforcement officers and judicial systems are flawed in that they are not required to and do not enquire as to whether or not the arrestee has children. Though this is one of many instances where children’s needs are disregarded, it is very clear that this neglect originates from the very beginning of the incarceration phase one: addressing the issue process. One of the child’s primary needs is to feel that they have a say in their relationship with the incarcerated parent and their living situation post-incarceration. In order to address this need, we strive to develop a product that will help maintain and improve the quality of the relationship between the child and their incarcerated parent. Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman Parsons The New School Of Design
    • research children of the incarcerated age distribution of children with parents in state or federal federal and state parental incarceration rates in the U.S. prison 2.1% 14.5% 20.4% <1 year H a ve 1-4 years 43% c hild r e n phase one: addressing the issue 5-9 years 10-14 years 28.0% D o no t ha ve 57% 15-17 years c hild r e n 35.1% 57% of parents in state and federal prison report 35.1% of these children fit intothe 5 to 9 age having a child under the age of 18 range, otherwise known as the “latency” stage.” Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman Parsons The New School Of Design
    • research the incarcerated: offenses by gender men women phase one: addressing the issue the majority of incacerated men are arrested for the majority of incacerated women are arrested violent offenses for drug offenses Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman Parsons The New School Of Design
    • research stages of child development Erik Erikson is a Freudian ego-psychologist. He took Freuds ideas of human development and expanded them into 8 stages phase one: addressing the issue i. infant (0-1) v. adolescence (12-18) ii. toddler (2-3) vi. young adult (the 20’s) iii. preschooler (3-6) vii. middle adult (late 20’s to 50’s) iv. school-ageor latency (7-12) viii. old adult (50’s and beyond) Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman Parsons The New School Of Design
    • research stage four: latency stage ages 5-9 phase one: addressing the issue psychosocial crisis significant relations psychosocial psychosocial virtues maladaptations and modalities malignancies industry vs. inferiority- family, neighborhood, to complete, to make competence- narrow virtuosity- child must “tame” the school- things together- the right balance of children who aren’t imagination. they must parents must encourage, unlike in stage 3, un- industry and inferiority. allowed to be “children” learn to conceive plans teachers and peers must derstands the rules of i.e. child prodigies and carry them out. accept. games, doesn’t make inertia-inferiority “if at first you don’t succeed, don’t even try again!” i.e. too humiliated to play after one loss Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman Parsons The New School Of Design
    • research how the child will react to trauma phase one: addressing the issue loss of a parent diverted energy coping patterns/ varying reactions stigma from their uncertainty peers Stunts development. Inability to form new Many care takers keep Maladaptive coping for having an Children not under attachments information from the behavior incarcerated parent. stress use energy to Anger children to protect Low self-esteem felt in master age-specific Depression them, but it only neighborhood and at tasks. Regression furthers feelings of school Anti-social behaviors uncertainty Communities offer few support strategies Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman Parsons The New School Of Design
    • research contributing to the missing link: the prison itself phase one: addressing the issue geographical distance/ intimidating Visitation lack of information non-contact visitation reluctance on the part transportation cost Areas about visiting hours of caregivers to visit Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman Parsons The New School Of Design
    • research contributing to the missing link: laws phase one: addressing the issue Foster Care Policies Mandatory Sentencing Laws The Federal Adoption Act and The Personal Responsibility Safe Families Act of 1997 And Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 Foster care parents receive Crime has a mandatory sentence Permanency planning for those in financial support Reduces judges flexibility in welfare system must occur within Many children go to relatives who Any person convicted of a drug determining best interest for the the first 12 months of placement do not crime is no longer eligible to child Women’s average sentence is 24- receive Temporary Aid for Need 36 months Families (TANF) Parental rights may be terminated Most parents incarcerated for a if child is in foster care for 15 out of Drug Offense the last 22 months Many parents have financial difficulties upon reentry Hinders regaining custody Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman Parsons The New School Of Design
    • research parental rights at time of arrest phase one: addressing the issue Right to an Attorney Miranda Right’s Communication with Family Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman Parsons The New School Of Design
    • research child’s general rights phase one: addressing the issue to receive age-appropriate none at time of arrest liberty to be free from economic treatment in the justice exploitation and other abuses system Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman Parsons The New School Of Design
    • research existing forms of communication in prison letters pay phone book on tape phase one: addressing the issue out of prison email cell or “free” phone face to face Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman Parsons The New School Of Design
    • research parent-child relationships Incarcerated parent Verbal Communication Visual contact Physical Contact Visitation day Phone Calls Visitation day Video Conference Video Conferencing phase one: addressing the issue Book on tape Not Incarcerated parent Verbal Communication Visual contact Physical Contact Everyday the parent isn’t out of Phone Calls Everyday town Cell Phones Bed time stories Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman Parsons The New School Of Design
    • product proposal initial concept sketches phase three: design concepts Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman Parsons The New School Of Design
    • product proposal quilt exchange program phase three: design concepts This will be a volenteer run program that is likned to guildes in the New York area. The Guilda Are Empire Quilter in Manhattan, The Quilters Guild Of Brooklyn, Stiches from the heart in Queens, and Quilt in Queens. Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman Parsons The New School Of Design
    • product proposal quilt exchange program phase three: design concepts Child collects fabric to send Child Mails Fabric to quilters Letter is delivered to Inmate sews square to quilters inmate arter quilters assembel kit Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman Parsons The New School Of Design
    • product proposal quilt exchange program phase three: design concepts Quilter mail to child inmate Mails letter to Child Gets Letter! Quilter and child assemble quilter squares Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman Parsons The New School Of Design
    • product proposal quilt exchange program + = phase three: design concepts Released inmate and child quilter completes Happy Family give squares for backing completes Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman Parsons The New School Of Design
    • product proposal why quilts? During the latency stage, a child comes to realize that the mother is separate from him through which it appears that the child has lost something. The child realizes that he is dependent on others and thus he loses the idea that he is independent, a realization which creates a difficult period and brings frustration and anxiety with it. In the end it is impossible that the mother is always there to ‘bring the world’ to the child, a realization which has a powerful, somewhat painful, but constructive impact on the child. Through fantasizing about the object of their wishes the child will find comfort. These could be real objects like a blanket or a teddy bear, but other ‘objects’, such as a melody or a word, can fulfill this role as well. This object represents all components of ‘mothering’, and it means that the child himself is able to create what he needs as well. It enables the child to have a fantasized bond with the mother when she gradually separates for increasingly longer periods of time. The transitional object is important at the time of going to sleep and as a defence against anxiety. Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman Parsons The New School Of Design
    • design process quilting traditional patterns phase three: designing the product friendship pin wheel strawberry friendship ring Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman Parsons The New School Of Design
    • design process quilting 100 years phase three: designing the product survival quilt 1930 1900 baby blanket hand done hand done 1960 machine quilted hand embroirded Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman Parsons The New School Of Design
    • design process quilting phase three: designing the product 1997 1980 completely machined machine quilted hand embroided Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman Parsons The New School Of Design
    • [LINK] the kit phase three: the product itself one pair of small sewing scissors pattern handbook scraps cut into form by the child two sewing needles thread with no spool Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman Parsons The New School Of Design
    • [LINK] levels of complexity according to time spent in prison phase three: the product itself beginner: the windmill intermediate: the snowflake advanced: baby blocks (4 hrs per square) (5-6 hrs per square) (6-7 hrs per square) 4 large dark triangles 4 large dark triangles 8 two inch dark diamonds 4 small midtone triangles 4 small dark diamonds 8 two inch midtone diamonds 4 small light triangles 4 large dark squares 8 two inch light diamonds 8 small midtone diamonds 24 diamond shapes 16 small light diamonds Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman Parsons The New School Of Design
    • [LINK] phase three: fnal product Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman Parsons The New School Of Design
    • sources children with incarcerated parents 1. Family Arrested 7.) http://www.norix.com/audio.asp Ann Edea Field accesed 10/16 2. Doing Time On The Outside 8. https://www.true.com/ Donald Braman 9. http://www.prisontalk.com/forums/ 3. Children Of Incarcerated Parents 10/15 Gabel Jhonson 10. http://www.fcnetwork.org/ 4. How To Do Good After Prison Michael B. Jackson 11. http://www.fcnetwork.org/ 5. 101 Patchwork Patterns Ruby McKim Dover Publications, Inc. New York 1962 6. Quilters Newsletter Magazine December 1995/NO. 278 Shireen Emami, Polina Ulendeeva, Lys Opp-Beckman Parsons The New School Of Design