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    Chapter 12 Chapter 12 Presentation Transcript

    • Chapter 12 Prepositions9th Edition, © 2008, Thomson/South-Western
    • Learning Objectives • Use objective-case pronouns as objects of prepositions. • Avoid using prepositions in place of verbs and adverbs.Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-2
    • Commonly Used Prepositions about but in after by into along with except of at for on between whom toMary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-3
    • Use objective-case pronouns as objects of prepositions. • Everyone except Leslie and her arrived early. • Just between you and me, sales are declining.Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-4
    • Fundamental Problems With Prepositions  Do not substitute the preposition of for the verb have. • They should have (not of) walked to the restaurant • We could have (not of) received free tickets.Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-5
    • Fundamental Problems With Prepositions  Do not replace the preposition from with the words off or off of. • Max borrowed the pen from (not off of) Brandon.Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-6
    • Fundamental Problems With Prepositions  Do not use the word to in place of the adverb too, which means “additionally” or “excessively.” • Give the cash receipts to the courier. • Sales reps received laptops and cell phones too. • The car was too small to carry the equipment.Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-7
    • Learning Objectives  Use troublesome prepositions correctly.  Omit unnecessary prepositions, retain necessary ones, and construct formal sentences that avoid terminal prepositions.Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-8
    • Challenging Prepositions Among, Between Beside, Besides Except In, Into LikeMary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-9
    • Among is used to Among, speak of three or Between more persons or things; between is used for two. • Profits will be divided among the nine partners. • Responsibility will be divided between the vice president and the general manager.Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-10
    • Beside means “next Beside, to”; besides means Besides “in addition to.” • Their parking lot is beside the office. • You have another option besides this one.Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-11
    • Use the preposition Except except to mean “but” or “excluding.” Use the verb accept to mean “receive.” • All pages except three must be copied. • We will now accept applications for the position.Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-12
    • In indicates a position In, Into or location. Into as one word means three things:  Entering into something. • She plans to go into accounting. • We will move into new facilities May 1.Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-13
    • Meanings of Into (concluded)  Changing the form of something. • The caterpillar changed into a butterfly.  Making contact. • Unable to stop, he ran into the back of the car in front of him. BUT Please turn the report in to your boss on time.Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-14
    • The preposition like Like should be used to introduce nouns or pronouns. Do not use like to introduce clauses. • Don’t you think Rachel looks like her? • They look as if (not like) they could be sisters.Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-15
    • Necessary Prepositions • Be sure to include those prepositions necessary to clarify a relationship. • Be particularly careful when two prepositions modify a single object.Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-16
    • Examples • Our appreciation for and interest in the project remain great. (Do not omit for.) • What style of printing do you prefer? (Do not omit of.) • She graduated from high school last year. (Do not omit from.)Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-17
    • Unnecessary Prepositions Omit unnecessary prepositions. • I’m not sure when the meeting is scheduled (not scheduled for). • Boxes were left outside (not outside of) the door.Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-18
    • Terminal Prepositions In formal writing, careful writers avoid ending clauses with prepositions. Less Formal More Formal What topic did he On what topic did lecture on? he lecture? Whom do you To whom do you wish to speak to? wish to speak?Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-19
    • Try Your Skill 1. You should (have, of) applied for the position online.Choose the 2. Dividends will becorrect word to divided (between, among) allcomplete these stockholders.sentences. 3. The break room is located (beside, besides) the copy room.Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-20
    • Try Your Skill 4. (Beside, Besides) your résumé, you must send a list of references.Choose the 5. Everyone (except,correct word to accept) him was given acomplete these raise.sentences. 6. You should go (in to, into) see your boss tomorrow.Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-21
    • Try Your Skill 7. He made quite an impression when he walked (in to, into) the room.Choose thecorrect word to 8. She looks (like, as if) she would make ancomplete these excellent employee.sentences. 9. Did the applicant (graduate, graduate from) college?Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-22
    • Learning Objectives • Recognize idioms and idiomatic constructions. • Use idioms involving prepositions correctly.Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-23
    • Idiomatic Expressions • “Idioms” are word combinations that are peculiar to a certain language. • In English learn to use specific prepositions with particular words. • Here are a few examples: agree to a proposal agree with a personMary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-24
    • Idiomatic Expressions (continued) angry at a thing angry with a person concur in an action concur with a person differ from things differ with persons different from (not than)Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-25
    • Idiomatic Expressions (concluded) expert in plan to (not on) retroactive to (not from) sensitive to talk to (tell something) talk with (exchange remarks)Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-26
    • Try Your Skill 1. No one will agree (to, with) such a crazy plan. 2. Lance was quite angryChoose the (at, with) his boss aftercorrect word the meeting.to completethese 3. Some managers did notsentences. concur (in, with) the new budget.Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-27
    • Try Your Skill 4. This office certainly differs (from, with) the others.Choose the 5. Salary adjustments arecorrect word retroactive (to, from)to complete July 1.thesesentences.Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-28
    • Try Your Skill 6. Do you plan (on going, to go) to the party? 7. Do you considerChoose the yourself an expert (at,correct word in) estate planning?to complete 8. Will the mediator bethese able to get the twosentences. parties to talk (to, with) each other?Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-29
    • “All speech, written or spoken, is a dead language, until it finds a willing and prepared hearer.” —Robert Louis Stevenson Click here for information about Robert Louis Stevenson.Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 9e 12-30