Ten ways to make your semantic
app addictive
Elena Simperl, University of
Innsbruck, AT
ISWC 2010
www.insemtives.eu 1
Executive summary
• Many aspects of semantic content authoring naturally rely
on human contribution.
• Motivating users to...
Our approach
• Typology of semantic content authoring tasks and
the ways they could motivate users to contribute.
• Method...
www.insemtives.eu 4
Incentives and motivation
• Incentives are ‘rewards’ assigned by an external ‘judge’
to a performer fo...
www.insemtives.eu 5
Examples
Examples (2)
www.insemtives.eu 6
Examples (3)
www.insemtives.eu 7
Harnessing human intelligence
Facebook reports 4,000,000,000 minutes (> 7500
person years) are spent on the site every day...
Harnessing human intelligence
www.insemtives.eu 9
Which tasks can be crowdsourced?
• Modularity/Divisibility:
can the task be divided
into smaller chunks (see
casual games,...
Example: video annotation
www.insemtives.eu 11
Example: ontology alignment
www.insemtives.eu 12
Example: ontology evaluation
www.insemtives.eu 13
Challenges
• Task selection, work breakdown and distribution
of labor
• Domain selection and creation of knowledge
corpus
...
Factors affecting participation
• Prize is higher
• Participants are more intrinsically motivated ,
have more free time, a...
Outline of the tutorial
Time Presentation
09:00 – 09:30 Human contributions in semantic content authoring
09:30 – 10:30 Me...
1/29/2015 www.insemtives.eu 17
Realizing the Semantic Web by
encouraging millions of end-users
to create semantic content.
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Introduction (1/6)

935 views
872 views

Published on

ISWC 2010: TUTORIAL: Ten Ways to Make your Semantic App Addictive

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
935
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
199
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Introduction (1/6)

  1. 1. Ten ways to make your semantic app addictive Elena Simperl, University of Innsbruck, AT ISWC 2010 www.insemtives.eu 1
  2. 2. Executive summary • Many aspects of semantic content authoring naturally rely on human contribution. • Motivating users to contribute is essential for semantic technologies to reach critical mass and ensure sustainable growth. • This tutorial is about – Methods and techniques to study incentives and motivators applicable to semantic content authoring scenarios. – How to implement the results of such studies through technology design, usability engineering, and game mechanics. www.insemtives.eu 2
  3. 3. Our approach • Typology of semantic content authoring tasks and the ways they could motivate users to contribute. • Methodology for analyzing and designing incentivized semantic applications. • Pilots, showcases and technology. www.insemtives.eu 3
  4. 4. www.insemtives.eu 4 Incentives and motivation • Incentives are ‘rewards’ assigned by an external ‘judge’ to a performer for undertaking a specific task. • Common belief (among economists): incentives can be translated into a sum of money for all practical purposes. • Incentives can be related to both extrinsic and intrinsic motivations. – Extrinsic motivation if task is considered • Boring, dangerous, useless, socially undesirable, dislikable by the performer. – Intrinsic motivation if • The performer likes what he/she is doing • The act is satisfying in itself (for various reasons).
  5. 5. www.insemtives.eu 5 Examples
  6. 6. Examples (2) www.insemtives.eu 6
  7. 7. Examples (3) www.insemtives.eu 7
  8. 8. Harnessing human intelligence Facebook reports 4,000,000,000 minutes (> 7500 person years) are spent on the site every day www.insemtives.eu 8 Recaptcha users solve 60 million CAPTCHAs a day, which accounts for around 160,000 human hours (19 person years) More than 18 000 titles preserved in 10 years
  9. 9. Harnessing human intelligence www.insemtives.eu 9
  10. 10. Which tasks can be crowdsourced? • Modularity/Divisibility: can the task be divided into smaller chunks (see casual games, Amazon’s Mechanical Turk, open source software) • Skills and expertise: does the task address a broad audience (see CAPTCHAs, casual games) • Combinability – Additive: pulling a rope (group performs better than individuals, but each individual pulls less hard) – Conjunctive: running in a pack (performance is that of the weakest member, group size reduces group performance) – Disjunctive: answering a quiz (group size increases group performance in term of the time needed to answer) www.insemtives.eu 10
  11. 11. Example: video annotation www.insemtives.eu 11
  12. 12. Example: ontology alignment www.insemtives.eu 12
  13. 13. Example: ontology evaluation www.insemtives.eu 13
  14. 14. Challenges • Task selection, work breakdown and distribution of labor • Domain selection and creation of knowledge corpus • Deriving formal representations from user inputs • Technology design • Intrinsic motivations www.insemtives.eu 14
  15. 15. Factors affecting participation • Prize is higher • Participants are more intrinsically motivated , have more free time, are non-experts in the field , and are not participating due to career concerns, social motivations, or to beat others. www.insemtives.eu 15 (Lakhani et al, 2007)
  16. 16. Outline of the tutorial Time Presentation 09:00 – 09:30 Human contributions in semantic content authoring 09:30 – 10:30 Methods and techniques to analyze and design incentivized semantic applications 10:30 – 11:00 Coffee break 11:00 – 12:30 Guidelines for incentivized technology design 12:30 - 13:30 Lunch break 13:30 – 14:30 Casual games for semantic content creation 14:30 – 15:00 Hands-on (Part I) 15:00 – 15:30 Coffee break 15:30 – 17:00 Hands-on (Part II) 17:00 – 17:30 Wrap-up and closing www.insemtives.eu 16
  17. 17. 1/29/2015 www.insemtives.eu 17 Realizing the Semantic Web by encouraging millions of end-users to create semantic content.

×