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How to build an inexpensive garden trellis
 

How to build an inexpensive garden trellis

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How to Build an Inexpensive Garden Trellis

How to Build an Inexpensive Garden Trellis

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    How to build an inexpensive garden trellis How to build an inexpensive garden trellis Document Transcript

    • How to Build an Inexpensive Garden Trellis Space is constrained in my personal garden raised beds, so I have to garden vertically so I can and make use of every square inch. This year, I decided that squash and cucumbers would share a 4'x8' bed. The cucumbers would need area to grow and so I needed to build a trellis. If you're looking for a fancy trellis created by a woodworker or somebody who can bend and twist wrought-iron in order to make art, then you'll have to look elsewhere. This is a fast and easy trellis made of wood and twine. The posts are 1x2's. You could use 2x4s but 1x2s are less expensive and they are sufficiently strong to support the weight of most vegetables so why not save a few bucks. You need two 1x2s to use as posts and another as a cross-piece that goes across the top. I avoid the whole old pressure treated wood (CCA) vs. new pressure treated wood (ACQ) in the garden argument by using ordinary lumber. It's going to decay in a few years, but at $1.88 for an 8 foot 1x2, I'd rather replace the wood rather than worrying about chemicals leaching into the soil. Will they or won't they? That is a query for someone else. Each post should be buried at least 18" deep or if you are building a trellis that goes inside a raised bed like mine, then you can secure it to the framework with 2 more screws. Keep in mind that you will want the two posts to be exactly the same height so the cross piece is level. A laser level is an excellent tool to easily accomplish this. If you don't have a laser level then put the cross piece on top and use a regular bubble level. Use a hammer to carefully tap the posts into the ground. Should you continue banging the cross piece off, then duct tape it. Once you are level, use two 3 inch galvanized screws to secure each joint. If you are worried about the wood cracking, then pre-drill your holes. Now measure and make pencil marks one-foot apart going down from the top and then along the cross-piece. Partially drill a short screw with a large head (or perhaps add a washer) into each mark. These screws are specifically for affixing your twine. Tie a knot around the first screw and then screw it in the rest of the way so that the twine is secure. Fasten the string going horizontally across the trellis then going vertically, screwing the screws in while you go. When going from top to bottom, tie a knot within the twine each spot that it crosses the horizontals. After enjoying a nice harvest of cucumbers this summer, I was very happy with the results of this garden venture. As mentioned before, my trellis might not look good enough for a gardening magazine but it certainly did the task. For more information on how to best utilize a garden trellis go to the website My Garden Trellis.