MOOCSEUM

The confluence
of informal
learning,
modern
technology and
learning theor y
MOOC = MASSIVE OPEN ONLINE COURSE
 Massive – Available to many; potentially limitless # of
learners
 Open – The structur...
A (VERY) BRIEF HISTORY OF MOOCS
2008 – The first MOOC, #CCK08, is taught by learning theorist George Siemens
as a test-dri...
OBSTACLES IN THE MOOC PHENOMENON
 Th e re i s n ot a n a g re e d - upon
s c h olarly de fi n it ion o f t h e M OOC.
 E...
WHY IS THE MOOC PHENOMENON
AWESOME?
 Mainstream discussi ons about
distance education, online
education and educational
t...
LEARNING VS. EDUCATION

“Education is about audit relationships, where a hierarchy
expects a product that demonstrates lea...
INTERACTION (OR INTRA -ACTION?)
MOOC – A (POTENTIAL) HUMAN-DRIVEN
LEARNING MACHINE
MOOCs

cMOOCs

 Structure – Housed in LMS
(learning management system)...
MOOCS & MUSEUMS – A GOOD FIT
 MOOCs are an oppor tunity for
authentic par ticipation (and
two-way communication)
between ...
WHY IS THE MOOCSEUM UNIQUE?

1. The MOOCseum is a traditional
MOOC.
2. The MOOCseum is a tangible space
(possibly with tan...
OVERCOMING LOGISTICS
Obstacles
 IT
 Co s t

 Ti m e/Work loads

 In s t i t ut ional P us h ba c k
( Re l uc t an ce/Z...
EXAMPLE MOOCS
 Coursera
MoMA MOOC - https://www.coursera.org/course/ artinquiry
E-Learning & Digital Cultures – https://w...
THANK YOU
Rolin Moe
Ed.D Candidate, Learning Technologies
Pepperdine University
Dissertation – The Evolution & Impact
of M...
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MOOCseum - The Confluence of Informal Learning, Modern Technology & Learning Theory

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Presentation for Museum Computer Network 2013 conference regarding the phenomenon of Massive Open Online Courses and the potential for the model to be used and remixed in a museum setting, including what would make a MOOCseum unique from other MOOCs

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MOOCseum - The Confluence of Informal Learning, Modern Technology & Learning Theory

  1. 1. MOOCSEUM The confluence of informal learning, modern technology and learning theor y
  2. 2. MOOC = MASSIVE OPEN ONLINE COURSE  Massive – Available to many; potentially limitless # of learners  Open – The structured learning experience (course & supplemental materials) is free of charge  Online – The hub of the course is based on the Internet via a host institution; interaction happens throughout the Web.  Course – A time-defined period of study including registration, af filiation and commencement.
  3. 3. A (VERY) BRIEF HISTORY OF MOOCS 2008 – The first MOOC, #CCK08, is taught by learning theorist George Siemens as a test-drive of his learning theory Connectivism. The acronym MOOC is coined by fellow EdTech scholars.  2011 – Four Stanford Computer Science professor s of fer three cour ses online at no charge to students not enrolled at the univer sity. Hundreds of thousands of students register.  201 2 – Three of those professor s star t up two distinct MOOC development organizations – Udacity and Cour sera. MIT and Har vard create their own non-profit organization, edX.  2013 – There are over 5,000,000 registered user s from over 200 countries across the Big 3 platforms, with likely millions more on smaller platforms or in institution -based MOOCs. MOOCs enjoy millions of dollar s of financing and venture capital. Politicians seek to ease accreditation restrictions to allow these EdTech ventures into the education marketplace. 2013 – Udacity founder Sebastian Thrun, in part due to struggles faced when rolling out courses to underrepresented university students, announces a company pivot away from Global access to education and a focus on corporate-based education
  4. 4. OBSTACLES IN THE MOOC PHENOMENON  Th e re i s n ot a n a g re e d - upon s c h olarly de fi n it ion o f t h e M OOC.  E ve r y l et te r i n t h e M OOC a c ro ny m i s c o n te n t ious.  H e a ds o f t h e B i g 3 M OOC pl a t fo rms l a c k ex pe r t i s e i n h um a n e duc a t i o n t h e o r y.  E duc a t i o n t h e o rist s a n d pra c t i t i one r s l a c k ex pe r t i s e i n AI/ M a c hine Le a rn i ng t h e o r y.  Po l ic y de c i sions a re be i n g m a de o n M OOCs be fo re a ny s o r t o f t ri a l run s o r te s t i ng.  Po pul a r de ba te a s s umes M OOCs a re s y n o ny mous w i t h di s t a n ce o r o n l ine l e a rning.  Po pul a r de ba te pi n e s fo r M OOCs to be a d i s ru p ti ve te c h n ol ogy t h a t c a n s ave e d u c ati on t h ro ug h .  If M OOCs a re o n l y a bo ut c o n te n t , M OOCs a l low a s i g nific ant de c re a se i n a c a de mic/ pro fessorial l a bo r.
  5. 5. WHY IS THE MOOC PHENOMENON AWESOME?  Mainstream discussi ons about distance education, online education and educational technology.  Professor s teaching MOOCs challenged to address their pedagogical practice.  Mainstream discussions about what Open means (open access, open content, open education resources).  More societal super structu res re engaging education provides more unique voices in how we as a society shape the future of education policy and education institutions.
  6. 6. LEARNING VS. EDUCATION “Education is about audit relationships, where a hierarchy expects a product that demonstrates learning. They are not interested in the process of the learning practice.” - Etienne Wenger
  7. 7. INTERACTION (OR INTRA -ACTION?)
  8. 8. MOOC – A (POTENTIAL) HUMAN-DRIVEN LEARNING MACHINE MOOCs cMOOCs  Structure – Housed in LMS (learning management system) requiring login credential  Objective – A master y of the subject matter; formal education  Content – Lecture via shor t videos providing established path to master y  Assessment – Interactive exercises, quizzes, tests graded by computer or peer s  Communication – Via discussion boards; social media happens outside the scope of course  Structure – Housed in LMS or via open hub  Objective – An authentic engagement with subject matter; non -formal learning.  Content – An amalgam of lecture, primar y source and discussion prompt providing various means to engage topic  Assessment – Creation of digital learning ar tifacts; peer collaboration in lieu of grades  Communication – Social media is the crux of the course (blogs, Twitter/FB, Google Docs, Google+ hangouts, etc.)
  9. 9. MOOCS & MUSEUMS – A GOOD FIT  MOOCs are an oppor tunity for authentic par ticipation (and two-way communication) between the institution and the patrons.  The MOOC can re -establish the museum in the local (and beyond) community.  The MOOC can re -establish the museum as a socially -viewed space of exper tise.  MOOCs can highlight special collections, traveling exhibitions, topical issues, etc.  The star t and end of a MOOC creates an event unique to space and time. It is a cohor t of learner s with the ability to become a community.
  10. 10. WHY IS THE MOOCSEUM UNIQUE? 1. The MOOCseum is a traditional MOOC. 2. The MOOCseum is a tangible space (possibly with tangible events). 3. The MOOCseum is an augment of the digital and the real. 4. The MOOCseum is a supplement; it is evidence of desired learning. Cupcakes (2010) by Megan Fizell. Icing-on-flour/sugar
  11. 11. OVERCOMING LOGISTICS Obstacles  IT  Co s t  Ti m e/Work loads  In s t i t ut ional P us h ba c k ( Re l uc t an ce/Z eal)  Audi e n c e Potential Solutions  A M OOC c a n run v i a LM S ( o pe n s o urc e o pt i o n s s uc h a s M o o dl e o r Ca nvas) o r v i a s po ke - and - w he el o n fre e s e r ver ( Wo rdP re ss, Ty pe Pa d ).  H a rdwa re c a n be fre e . P ri m a r y c o s t w i l l be e m ployee -base d.  If e n g aging t h e co n te n t a ro un d ex i s t ing a r t i fa c t s, h um a n re s o urc e s c a n fo c us o n de s ig nin g l e a rn ing s pa c e , pro m pt s , s o c ial m e di a, i n te ra c tio n…  E duc a t i o n s h o uld n ot be a h a m mer i n s e a rc h o f a n a il. Set c l e a r g o a ls a n d o bj e c t ives fro m t h e s t a r t fo r t h e e n t i re te a m .  Po s t m odernism s ay s we a re n ot j us t s t ude n t s but we a re k n ow l edge c o n s umer s. If yo u bui l d i t , t h ey w i l l come.
  12. 12. EXAMPLE MOOCS  Coursera MoMA MOOC - https://www.coursera.org/course/ artinquiry E-Learning & Digital Cultures – https://www.coursera.org/ course/edc Modern & Contemporary American Poetry - https:// www.coursera.org/course/modernpoetry  edX (Resource on MOOC research) - https://www.edx.org/researchpedagogy  cMOOC Educational Technology & Media - http://etmooc.org Wide World of Education - http://wideworlded.org/onlineinstruction-for-open-educators/ MOOCMOOC - http://www.moocmooc.com
  13. 13. THANK YOU Rolin Moe Ed.D Candidate, Learning Technologies Pepperdine University Dissertation – The Evolution & Impact of Massive Open Online Courses Capstone - MOOCseum Twitter - @RMoeJo Me – http://rolinmoe.org Me & MOOCs – http://allmoocs.wordpress.com
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