England After the Conquest
Political                       EconomicMilitary           Cultural
Some Themes (1066-1327)• Problem of succession• Development of Common Law• Distribution of power  – King  – Nobles  – Comm...
Some Themes (1066-1327+)• King vs. Church; England vs. Rome• England vs. France
Legacy – Pre-Conquest England•   Tax system – Danegeld, heregeld•   Shiring•   Cities•   Law – Charters in the vernacular•...
England 1066Sons of Godwine
William the ConquerorSuccessor to Edward theConfessor
William the Rightful Successor• …above all else the one God to be venerated  throughout his entire kingdom; the one Christ...
Succession
Succession - Different CustomsNormandy   A bequest, made formally, in the presence of   witnesses, it could not legally be...
Harold’s Oath
Matilda
Anglo-Norman Empire
FeudalismWhen did feudalism start in Great Britain?  a.   873 Alfred the Great  b.   1215 John  c.   1066 Conquest ✔  d.  ...
FeudalismWhen did feudalism end in Royal territories?  a.   2004  b.   1648 Cromwell  c.   1215 Magna Carta  d.   1560 Hen...
Date set for demise of the feudal systemNovember 22, 2002 Scotlands ancient feudal systemof property ownership will be con...
Royal Finances - Feudal• ‘Aids’  – knighthood, marriage, ransom• Relief  – Payments on inheritance  – Marriage, wardship• ...
Royal Finances – Non-feudal• Geld  – land based tax• Income from royal demesne  – rent  – sale of crops and livestock• Tal...
Royal Finances – Judicial• Judicial writs        Enforcement• Fines            • Foresters• Forest           • Sheriffs
Choices for the Anglo-Saxons• Capture  – gentile confinement  – monastery• Flee  –   Scotland  –   Flanders  –   Scandinav...
Choices for the Anglo-Saxons• Join and cooperate  – work as administrators  – switch masters  – Adopt Norman ways     • in...
The Norman Occupation  Close associates of William     170 Tenants-in-chief    5,000 -10,000 Knights              vs.     ...
William’s Supporters           Name            Ships   Manors (£)Robert, Count of Mortain     120         2100Odo, Bishop ...
Wasting of the Southeast
Fortifying England Castles
Motte and Bailey
Motte and Bailey Castle
1067• Temporary fortifications  – London – tower  – Ludgate? –Montfichet  – London - Baynard’s Castle• England entrusted t...
Motte and Bailey: Windsor
Arundel, 1067, 1138
Clifford’s Tower York
Colchester
Chepstow Welsh Border
Expanding Territory             Fighting Rebels• Anglo-Saxon holdouts  –   Danish allies  –   Norse allies  –   Welsh alli...
1 S2013 England after the Conquest
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

1 S2013 England after the Conquest

288

Published on

Legacy of the Anglo-Saxons. The followup to William the Conqueror's invasion. His supporters. His wife, Matilda. Castle construction.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
288
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • The Danegeld (pron.: /ˈdeɪn.ɡɛld/;[1] "Danish tax", literally "Dane Money") was a tax raised to pay tribute to the Viking raiders to save a land from being ravaged. It was called the geld or gafol in eleventh-century sources;[2] the term Danegeld did not appear until the early twelfth century.[3] It was characteristic of royal policy in both England and Francia during the ninth through eleventh centuries, collected both as tributary, to buy off the attackers, and as stipendiary, to pay the defensive forcesHeregeld A tribute or tax levied for the maintenance of an army.
  • 11th C. 1067c.1070 1101/2Saxon Burgh on east bank of River Arun. Roger of Montgomery granted western Sussex, established seat at Arundel, on west bank. Builds earthwork and tim- ber castle with two wards in a similar pattern to Windsor.Gatehouse built in stone. [Pulborough stone, brought down river]. Roger’s son, Robert of Bellême, rebels against Henry I. Besieged. Surrenders after 3 months. King takes over castle. Later his wife, Alice inherits castle.1138Alice marries William d’Albini (of Buck- enham and Castle Rising. D’Albinibuildsshellkeep in stone
  • 1 S2013 England after the Conquest

    1. 1. England After the Conquest
    2. 2. Political EconomicMilitary Cultural
    3. 3. Some Themes (1066-1327)• Problem of succession• Development of Common Law• Distribution of power – King – Nobles – Commoners
    4. 4. Some Themes (1066-1327+)• King vs. Church; England vs. Rome• England vs. France
    5. 5. Legacy – Pre-Conquest England• Tax system – Danegeld, heregeld• Shiring• Cities• Law – Charters in the vernacular• Concentration of land ownership• Agricultural advancements
    6. 6. England 1066Sons of Godwine
    7. 7. William the ConquerorSuccessor to Edward theConfessor
    8. 8. William the Rightful Successor• …above all else the one God to be venerated throughout his entire kingdom; the one Christian faith always to be kept inviolate; peace and security to be maintained between Englishmen and Normans• … I wish and enjoin: that in [cases affecting] lands, as in all other matters, all shall keep and hold the law of King Edward, with the addition of those [amendments] which I have made for the benefit of the English people
    9. 9. Succession
    10. 10. Succession - Different CustomsNormandy A bequest, made formally, in the presence of witnesses, it could not legally be revokedEngland Verba novissima An act made on ones death-bed, in extremis, was taken to supersede previous donations of the same propertyJohn S. Beckerman “Succession in Normandy, 1087, and inEngland, 1066: The Role of Testamentary Custom”Speculum, Vol. 47, No. 2 (Apr., 1972), pp. 258-260
    11. 11. Harold’s Oath
    12. 12. Matilda
    13. 13. Anglo-Norman Empire
    14. 14. FeudalismWhen did feudalism start in Great Britain? a. 873 Alfred the Great b. 1215 John c. 1066 Conquest ✔ d. 1042 Edward the Confessor e. 1776 Revolution in the colonies
    15. 15. FeudalismWhen did feudalism end in Royal territories? a. 2004 b. 1648 Cromwell c. 1215 Magna Carta d. 1560 Henry VIII e. 2008 f. Not yet
    16. 16. Date set for demise of the feudal systemNovember 22, 2002 Scotlands ancient feudal systemof property ownership will be consigned to history injust over two years.The legislation, one of a series ofexecutive bills to reform Scotlands land and propertylaws, is based on a report by the Law Commission thatfollowed the passing of the Abolition of Feudal TenureAct in 2000. both pieces of legislation would come intoforce on November 28, 2004. Sark - 2008
    17. 17. Royal Finances - Feudal• ‘Aids’ – knighthood, marriage, ransom• Relief – Payments on inheritance – Marriage, wardship• Scutage
    18. 18. Royal Finances – Non-feudal• Geld – land based tax• Income from royal demesne – rent – sale of crops and livestock• Tallage – tax imposed upon residents of King’s land, townsmen and Jews
    19. 19. Royal Finances – Judicial• Judicial writs Enforcement• Fines • Foresters• Forest • Sheriffs
    20. 20. Choices for the Anglo-Saxons• Capture – gentile confinement – monastery• Flee – Scotland – Flanders – Scandinavia – Byzantium
    21. 21. Choices for the Anglo-Saxons• Join and cooperate – work as administrators – switch masters – Adopt Norman ways • inter-marry • change names• Rebel
    22. 22. The Norman Occupation Close associates of William 170 Tenants-in-chief 5,000 -10,000 Knights vs. 1-1.5 million English
    23. 23. William’s Supporters Name Ships Manors (£)Robert, Count of Mortain 120 2100Odo, Bishop of Bayeux 100 >3000William, Count of Evreux 80Roger of Montgomery 60 2430William fitz Osbern 60 forfeitHugh, Earl of Chester 60 800Robert, Count of Eu 60 <180Roger of Beaumont 60 <114
    24. 24. Wasting of the Southeast
    25. 25. Fortifying England Castles
    26. 26. Motte and Bailey
    27. 27. Motte and Bailey Castle
    28. 28. 1067• Temporary fortifications – London – tower – Ludgate? –Montfichet – London - Baynard’s Castle• England entrusted to William Fitz Osbern and Bishop Odo when William returns to Normandy
    29. 29. Motte and Bailey: Windsor
    30. 30. Arundel, 1067, 1138
    31. 31. Clifford’s Tower York
    32. 32. Colchester
    33. 33. Chepstow Welsh Border
    34. 34. Expanding Territory Fighting Rebels• Anglo-Saxon holdouts – Danish allies – Norse allies – Welsh allies – Scottish allies• Disgruntled Normans
    1. Gostou de algum slide específico?

      Recortar slides é uma maneira fácil de colecionar informações para acessar mais tarde.

    ×