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Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny
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Personal Branding and LinkedIn Networking - 72U, 72andSunny

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This presentation was given for the 72U students at 72andSunny in Los Angeles. I covered three basic areas: how to create your personal brand online, how to get the most our of LinkedIn, and how to …

This presentation was given for the 72U students at 72andSunny in Los Angeles. I covered three basic areas: how to create your personal brand online, how to get the most our of LinkedIn, and how to get a meeting with someone you don't know using LinkedIn and other networking/online tools.

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  • offers a four-part framework to assist people in articulating their brands and developing a personal branding statement.
  • describe who we are, what we most want people to remember about us. This is a short, hopefully catchy statement, what some may call an elevator pitch that prompts people to say, “I get this person.” Frank would describe her “who statement” as: I am a navigator. I help people find their way.
  • Profoundly changed my view on how the world worked – great leaders think, act communicate the exact same way
  • We are constantly sending a signal to the worldVoicemailSignature lineSocial media: Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest…WebsiteBlogPodcastHow you introduce yourself and describe what you doEvents
  • Why is it important for us to be active in social media? These social networks and communities offer a vehicle for us to nurture our relationships, tap the wisdom of our networks, monitor the latest developments in our fields, share our experience, and contribute to the conversation. It is also where the action is. According to a recent study conducted by Forrester Research, a staggering 100 percent of business decision-makers surveyed use social media for work purposes. Almost all (98 percent) read blogs, watch videos, and listen to podcasts); two-thirds comment on blogs and post ratings and reviews, and 79 percent of those maintain a profile on social networking sites “all in the context of their business activities.”
  • Packaging is important
  • A good place to begin to build our networks is by taking a simple inventory. Start with our closest relationships, the people we know, our friends and family. Add on school friends, parents of our children’s friends if applicable and relevant, and people that we worked with or volunteered with in the past. Think of people we may have met while traveling, or in a cycling group, or with whom we may attend church or temple. Do not forget former bosses, friends with whom we may have gone to camp, or fraternity brothers or sorority sisters. Add colleagues from work and clients—even competitors.  Some people find it useful to map these contacts visually. Placing ourselves in the center, and as the figure below suggests, we develop categories to classify our relationships. From there we add names to each section. We have found it fruitful to return to this exercise multiple times to see if the process has further jogged our memories. Continue to add new contacts as appropriate: the people throughout our organizations with whom we interact and those that we connect with at meetings or conferences. Seek out diversity. While our close-knit group of friends and colleagues may always be there for us, they may not be the most effective in helping us stay on the cutting edge of what is happening in the marketing world. The reason is that we probably see the world similarly.
  • Research shows that these “weaker ties” are more likely to provide information about jobs that led to employment than closer friends, because they have access to a different pool of resources, as Figure XX illustrates. On a broader scale, societies in which people have many weak ties in addition to their strong ties have been found to be more innovative.
  • Our networks are verbs, not nouns; we don’t own them, we interact with them. To be mutually beneficial, we must try and give something of value in every interaction—not gifts, but information or a useful introduction
  • Finely tune your searches when you filter by years of experience, seniority level, job function, company size, groups, and more. Premium members get up to 8 additional search filters. First, find the Advanced link to the right of the search box at the top of any page. Once you’ve clicked through, all of your Premium filters have a gold LinkedIn logo next to them. Whether you’re selling, job-hunting, recruiting, or building your business, you’ve likely got an ideal target in mind. Premium filters let you focus on reaching exactly who you need to find, whether they be experience executives, people who work at SMBs, or any other specific segment. ou can filter by relationship, groups, location and industry, and the Save Search function even allows you to store effective criteria.
  • Ask that person to help you gather information about the company, and try to get some insights into company priorities and cultureAlso see what you can learn about the company’s top motivation in hiring decisions — what priorities or issues the company considersBe direct and be proactive. Prepare to ask about specific people they know, and about specific jobs at their companies.
  • In an effort to manage spam, LinkedIn requires members to pay to send InMail. InMail is most useful for members who want to contact a wide variety of people, such as recruiters or individuals using LinkedIn for business development.There is one exception in which you can send InMail for free, even if you don’t have a premium account: You can send InMail at no charge to members who participate in the OpenLink Network. LinkedIn identifies these members with the OpenLink icon on their profiles or in search results. To enable other members to send you free InMail, you must specify that you want to participate in the OpenLink Network when you sign up for a premium account.LinkedIn premium accounts, including Job Seeker premium accounts, enable you to send a fixed number of InMail messages per month. To learn more about LinkedIn premium accounts and InMail, click the Upgrade link on the navigation menu.You can also purchase individual InMails at $10 each by pausing over your photo in the upper-right corner of the screen and selecting Review. Then click the Purchase link below the InMails field on the Account & Settings page. This is cost-efficient only if you want to contact just a few people by InMail.
  • What does a successful InMail/Request for Informational Interview Look Like?
  • Be prepared with key information Want to make a great first impression with new contacts? Before you reach out, take a look at their profile to gather some insight on their background, interests, and career path. You can use this info as a conversation starter. With your Premium account, you can see full profiles for your entire network—including all 3rd-degree connections and group members. Basic members can only see employer and school names.
  • Request an introduction through a mutual connection
  • Don’t psych yourself out when you network because you feel it’s going to make or break you getting a job. It’s like your resume, it needs to be in good shape, but it is never the only factor in getting you the job.Instead, focus on making a connection. Listen to people, engage them in conversation, use the advantages of face-to-face neworking (ie. body language, facial expressions, eye contact, etc.). If you leave making one new friend, you succeeded in face-to-face networking in my book!The direction of your network is in your handsYou need to make sure that you steer it in a direction that is strategic to your job search. Make sure to connect with people who are in industries that interest you, in companies you might like to learn more about or even in geographies that you would like to move to.
  • Click on the plus box to start adding content. It is important to note that your content needs to live online. LinkedIn doesn’t offer an upload Content can be added to your LinkedIn profile in the form of photos/images, videos, presentations, documents and audio recordings
  • Cant reorder, only visible to connections, preview not so greatWhen you add a link to your Professional Portfolio, the image, title and description will autopopulate, which means that the image drawn from a multi-image article may not be the one you want.One way to retain control over images is to upload an image and then enter the information manually. However, you don’t get the benefit of the link being clickable or hyperlinked. It all depends on your priority between clickable links vs. having some control over the image that’s populated.
  • OpenLink Want to send a strong signal that you’re open to new opportunities and connections? When you join the OpenLink network, To turn on your OpenLink profile badge, just look for the OpenLink area on your Settings page
  • Transcript

    • 1. Creating Your Personal Brand + Searching for a Job with LinkedIn + How to Get a Meeting with Anyone By Robeen Frank 72U – 72andSunny April 8, 2014
    • 2. Today’s Workshop •  Creating your personal brand + sparking Word of Mouth about you and the position you are looking for •  Networking to get meetings with people you don’t know + using LinkedIn to the max
    • 3. Let’s Dive In!
    • 4. Personal Branding
    • 5. Transparency is Sexy •  Your brand is your driving force ▫  Not a slogan or ad campaign, but a living thing = your character in action ▫  Sense of purpose, what you stand for, what sets you apart ▫  You will always be too much of something for someone •  How you tell people clearly and memorably what you do ▫  So they can spread the word •  How you present yourself online and offline ▫  Not contriving an image you think will be accepted, but getting clear on your attributes ▫  Which one are vital to your success? What do you offer the world as a result of those attributes
    • 6. Developing Your Brand Online Will Help YOU •  With your current job •  Your next job/career •  Find partnerships •  Build relationships •  Network and unlock opportunities •  Get more clients
    • 7. The High Cost of Being Forgotten •  The best opportunities come when a friend refers you to another friend: Word Of Mouth •  How do you make it easy for people to remember you? •  How do you not blend in?
    • 8. You Are Being Googled YOU
    • 9. My 4 Part Framework •  WHO YOU ARE – Short mantra – what you want the listener to remember most about you •  WHAT - Tag line – how you add value + your unique benefits, how what you do is different •  WHY – Passion - why you do what you do •  GOAL – What you want – customized for different audiences so the listener knows what you are asking
    • 10. Who: The Art of Pitchcraft •  Whether you are trying to raise capital, promote your company, or promote yourself – an Elevator Pitch is essential
    • 11. A Great Pitch Includes a Powerful Brand Mantra •  Quick, punchy, memorable statement ▫  Communicate your message clearly to someone who doesn’t know you •  Practice & Planning ▫  Deliver it on the spot under pressure •  One minute to say it all
    • 12. Don’t Ignore the WHY •  Why do you do what you do - this reflects your passion •  Most people tend to skip their why – they see it as less significant •  The WHY is essential – what generally grabs people’s attention and makes us memorable is not what we do, but why we do it •  This is where our personal values, our vision, and our enthusiasm comes though •  I love helping others achieve their goals. I work with people to create a compelling persona that conveys their passion and expertise – getting them where they want to go personally and professionally
    • 13. Get at the Passion Behind What You Do •  People don’t buy what you do; they buy WHY you do it ▫  How Successful People Sell Themselves (Simon Sinek) ▫  What is the core belief that drives everything you do? ▫  Apple   We make great computers –they are beautifully designed, perform well and are easy to use, want to buy one?   Everything we do, we believe in challenging the status quo, thinking differently. The way we do this is by making products that are beautifully designed, simple to use, and user-friendly, and they happen to be great computers -want to buy one? •  Psychology ▫  The WHY talks to an area of the brain that controls behavior and decision-making ▫  People are biologically more apt to agree with you ▫  Your enthusiasm shines through
    • 14. What •  How do you add value? •  What are your distinctive benefits? •  How is what you do different from what others like you do – brand value proposition •  “I help people imagine and create their brand online quickly and efficiently.”
    • 15. Goals •  What do you want? •  What are you trying to accomplish? •  This determines how and where to focus your personal branding efforts including what type of a digital presence makes sense
    • 16. Me, Myself and I •  WHO: I am a navigator – I help people find their way •  WHAT: I help people imagine and create their brand online quickly and efficiently •  WHY: I love helping others achieve their goals. I work with people to create a compelling persona that conveys their passion and expertise – getting them where they want to go personally and professionally. •  GOAL: I’m looking for 1-2 more clients. Do you know anyone who would find this service valuable - who needs a strong and compelling personal brand and online presence to get to the next step in their careers?
    • 17. The Time is Now •  Break up into groups of two •  Create a compelling brand ▫  Interview each other and think harder ▫  What do you do? Who do you serve? How do you do it? Why do you do it? ▫  Tell stories, say things you wouldn’t ordinarily say, find out where you flow and feel inspired ▫  Create one zinger line ▫  Edit each other’s •  We’ll regroup and share together
    • 18. The Rest is Accurate, Consistent Packaging •  However you define your personal brand, it must be authentic - it should ring true to who you are and how you live •  Your brand should be consistent both online and offline, manifesting itself in how you answer your phone, introduce yourself, what you retweet, and even the community organizations with which you engage
    • 19. Master Your Universe •  Own YOU.com ▫  Make it professional •  Google Search ▫  Goal: make yourself the first full page of Google search results (pictures too) •  Engage in social networks ▫  Smartly, strategically •  Know what is being said about you ▫  Google Alerts
    • 20. Choose Your Platform •  Each platform has different strengths •  Your brand is consistent between platforms •  LinkedIn – great for connecting/ networking/job searching •  Twitter – thought leadership ▫  Hobby or topic you are fascinated with •  YouTube – content and/or playlists •  Google+ - SEO •  Pinterest – boards •  Blog – Easily your best strategy
    • 21. •  We are visual creatures and make snap judgments about people, places, and things based on a glance •  Get great head shots and action shots of you in your element •  Pay attention to colors, logos and fonts
    • 22. How to Get a Meeting with Someone You Don’t Know •  Networking •  Maximizing Your Use of LinkedIn
    • 23. Getting a Job is 60% Networking •  Breaking it down ▫  20% - Applying directly to a job ▫  20% - Great resume, great online brand, great LinkedIn, great social ▫  60% - Networking
    • 24. Networking: Quality not Quantity •  None of us is an island ▫  Personal branding is the foundation, but our careers and social endeavors are greatly enriched and impacted by the ecosystem of resources and support that surrounds us. ▫  People in our networks serve a variety of purposes – they can stimulate our thinking, expand our options, help us make better decisions, provide insight into our careers. •  Deepen your connection ▫  Building our networks is not about quantity it is about deepening our connection with people you may have just met or may have known for our whole lives •  Be a people hub ▫  One of the most valuable things you can do for someone is connect them with the right person ▫  Facilitate a mutually beneficial connection / relationship.
    • 25. Be Strategic: The direction of your network is in your hands
    • 26. Weak Links are More Powerful •  Weak social ties account for most of the structure of social networks in society as well as the transmission of information through these networks •  More novel information flows to individuals through weak rather than strong ties •  Our close friends tend to move in the same circles that we do – and the information they receive overlaps considerably with what we already know
    • 27. Network is a Verb Not a Noun •  Care and feeding of your network ▫  Give something of value in every interaction ▫  Send a message with an update or article or interesting event – divide your network in 12 and do that each month
    • 28. Why Don’t We Follow Up? •  You’re one connection away from getting the job of your dreams •  Sometimes you MEET that one connection. You know it’s right for you. And you know it’s right for them. But for some reason, you NEVER follow up. •  Why? ▫  We forget ▫  Negative thoughts prevent you from taking action ▫  Networking can feel force, unnatural, and sleazy
    • 29. The Key to the Successful Follow-Up •  Put a reminder in calendar 5-10 days from initial meeting to email with a few words about the conversation •  How to make sure they read it? ▫  Now: I’ll email you in a week or two (they are expecting your email) ▫  eMail: don’t ask for anything – offer something or ask a question   Offer a potential solution, data, research you think they would be interested in   Say: Nice to meet you. Are you launching anything new or going to any interesting events anytime soon?
    • 30. Getting Referrals and Introductions •  Increase your chances of being interviewed and getting a better job by 5-10X over applying directly •  Some connections you make along the way will surprise you, and put you on a path you never even considered
    • 31. Getting Referrals – Networking Forwards •  Meet 4 people who can vouch for your past performance and future potential, and willingly recommend you to others ▫  Professors, advisors, or social connections •  Ask them to review your resume or LinkedIn profile •  Ask if they would be comfortable recommending you to people they know who are connected to others in companies or industries of interest ▫  Get the names of 4 people and their contact information, and ask if they would introduce you ▫  Look at their connections on LinkedIn and have in mind specific people you would like to meet with ▫  If they say no, go find someone else to meet with •  Track everything in a spreadsheet – meetings and recommendations
    • 32. Networking Backwards – Search For Your Ideal Contact
    • 33. Introductions –a trustworthy way to connect via people you know in common •  Start with a job or company that you are interested in •  Find out who you're connected to (1st Degree) who knows someone in the company (2nd Degree) and ask to be referred/introduced
    • 34. InMail – When You Have No Connections •  If you don’t receive a reply, LinkedIn will refund your credit automatically
    • 35. What to Say to Strangers •  Lead with something in common ▫  Though it might seem obvious, it works to contextualize the conversation. If you have nothing in common, then mention how you found the other person- ie research on LinkedIn. •  Get to your point fast ▫  Be specific. Tell the person exactly why you want to connect – to ask questions about a company or industry. •  Reassure the person that you’re not asking for a favor ▫  No one likes being put on the spot. If people suspect that you’re going to ask them for a job, they may anticipate having to turn you down. Saying no isn’t fun and most people try to avoid it. Be firm that you are just looking for a meeting •  Talk about what makes you qualified ▫  Show your contact that you are uniquely qualified based on your skills and background •  End with a strong call to action with a time limit ▫  Mention that you need only 15 minutes of their time. Make sure you end with a clear next step. Are you asking for a phone number? Are you asking to pick a time next week? •  Be respectful = Show appreciation for their time ▫  Professional appreciation can go a long way and help you look more assertive “I’d really appreciate it if you would…”
    • 36. The Perfect Meeting Request Dear [name], I found your profile through the [name the common LinkedIn Group or network] on LinkedIn. I have been working as a [name last position] at [name last company], and I am in the process of making a career transition. It would be helpful for me to find out about your experiences as a [name role] for [target company]. I promise not to take more than 15 minutes of your time. I am not expecting to discuss a particular job opening, but I would appreciate being able to talk with you on an informational basis. What is the best way to reach you this week? I have Thursday at 9 a.m. and Friday at 2 p.m. available. If these times conflict with your schedule, I am happy to meet with you at your convenience. I thank you in advance. Regards, [your name] If someone doesn’t get back to you within a week, you can try sending another request. Assume that this person is simply busy. After the second try, however, assume the answer is no, and stop pursuing this contact. The last thing you want to be is a pest.
    • 37. The 1-2 Punch •  Offer value before you ask for anything ▫  You should constantly be asking yourself “How can I help this person?” ▫  Do not discount yourself just because you’re young. You have unique insights, social media skills, connections, and the ability to hustle that most older people do not.  Offer what you have based on what people need ▫  Add value - Offer to create a website, a video, something they might need •  Do your research ▫  Take time to check Google, Twitter, BranchOut, LinkedIn, Facebook, etc. so you really understand what the person is all about. Know the basics. Then go one step further and search for details. For example, one of my mentors is someone I connected with because I reached out and mentioned we both like to dive. Another is someone I bonded with based on going to burning man. Do your homework and find a good hook so you stand out from everyone else
    • 38. Do Your LinkedIn Homework •  How You’re Connected.  These are the friends you have in common. You may even want to contact one or two of them to get the scoop on this person •  In Common With.  Scroll over each circle to see what you have in common. This can include past employers, location, schools, groups, interests, etc. It’s a great place to find bits of information to break the ice when meeting someone.  •  Professional Gallery. Watching a video they’re in, reading a document they wrote, viewing a slideshow they prepared, etc. can really give you insights into who they are and what’s important to them. •  Recommendations. Read a few they’ve received and also some they wrote for others. This is priceless information. You’ll gain great insights into what they think is important and what others think about them. •  If you find a fellow alumnus here, it’s usually a home run. •  Groups.  By scrolling through the full list of the person’s LinkedIn groups, you can really get a feel for their personal and professional interests. •  Interests.  In this section the person lays out on a golden platter what he/she is most passionate about. These are perfect conversation starters. •  Volunteer Experience & Causes.  This may give you even more insight into where someone’s heart is. Don’t be afraid to mention this in your discussion with the person. People usually love to talk about the organizations they support. •  Experience.  Look for companies, careers, etc. that you have in common and thus can leverage when starting a new relationship. You may also find significant volunteer experiences listed here that are great conversation starters.
    • 39. In the Meeting •  Be prepared •  Be present •  Be enthusiastic
    • 40. Change the Game •  Wanting to have coffee is an ask for a favor - offering to share knowledge is a different game •  Tech has a “pay-it-forward” culture where we try to help each other without asking for anything in return •  Given infinite time, most would take every one of the “can I have coffee” meetings. Want to get past the filter? Offer something in return •  Who is offering me something in return – teach them something they don’t know ▫  “I’d like to have coffee to bounce an idea off you and in exchange I’ll tell you about what we learned about xx.”
    • 41. If You Don’t have a Contact •  Look at the groups you’re a member of for any potential contacts •  Join a group that this person belongs to and then send a message or invitation to connect as a fellow group member •  Go outside LinkedIn by accessing the website links and external email information that individuals provide on their profiles •  Broaden your network and then see what happens
    • 42. LinkedIn Connection Request: What to Say •  Personalize Each LinkedIn Connection Request You Send ▫  NOT: I’d like to add you to my professional network on LinkedIn ▫  The generic message can imply either that you don’t have the time to send a personal request or that they aren’t important enough to warrant a personalized request ▫  To stand apart from other job seekers, you need to be different in ALL of your communications. Use every chance you get to demonstrate your personality and motivation. ▫  Anything shared is good. School, job, contacts, etc. •  Personalize each connection request with a reminder of how the person knows you or explain why they should connect with you, ▫  Particularly important for people you’ve never met
    • 43. It’s a Numbers Game
    • 44. Take LinkedIn to the Next Level: Go Premium •  LinkedIn is about establishing your professional identity, growing your network, and being great at what you do
    • 45. Discover who’s interested in you •  Any time someone checks out your LinkedIn profile, it’s an opportunity. The more information you have about the people who are looking, the better equipped you are to reach out, follow up, or improve your professional presence •  Your Premium account gives you more visibility. All LinkedIn members are able to see the past five people who have viewed their profile •  Only LinkedIn Premium members are able to see everyone who has viewed their profile for the past 90 days*
    • 46. Save Your Searches •  Easily stay on top of your search •  Once you’ve narrowed down your search to return people who fit your needs, there’s no need to go back and search again every time you want to find new results •  Simply save your favorite searches, and LinkedIn will send you automatic alerts whenever new results appear •  Members are always updating their profiles, and approximately two new people join LinkedIn every second
    • 47. Dig Deeper with Premium Insights •  Help your profile get noticed by the right people •  With Profile Stats Pro, you can see: ▫  A trending graph showing how many people viewed your profile and how many times you appeared in search results over the past 90 days ▫  Top search keywords that led to your profile Views by industry and geography Take a look at the top search words and make sure keywords that are relevant to your career and objectives are listed •  Adjust your profile to include different keywords
    • 48. Endorse Others •  Show others that you appreciate and admire their work, not to build your own endorsements •  If a connection does reciprocate, take the opportunity to grow your relationship with a personal thank-you message
    • 49. Use the Portfolio Feature
    • 50. Example Portfolio
    • 51. LinkedIn or Twitter for Outreach •  Between LinkedIn and Twitter, LinkedIn is the better way to reach out to potential info interview contacts because you can be more detailed in your request, thanks to LinkedIn’s lengthier messaging format •  If you use Twitter, you’re confined to 140 characters, which doesn’t help you make a compelling case about why the person should talk to you. So use Twitter to get a person’s attention, but use LinkedIn to request the call
    • 52. Cheat Sheet
    • 53. OpenLink •  Any LinkedIn member can send you a message for free
    • 54. Anonymous Stalking •  The top rated feature for many is Who’s Viewed Your Profile •  This is a great feature for you to see who is “stalking” you. However, if you don’t want people to know when you’ve been checking them out, you can change your setting and be totally anonymous. But if you do this, you will no longer see the names of the people who have viewed your profile •  Privacy & Settings>Profile>Select what others see when you’ve viewed their profile.
    • 55. Not so Anonymous Stalking - Building Relationships •  Who do you want to meet? Who do you want to promote you to their audience? ▫  List the 20 people you most want to interact with in social media ▫  Create a list for them on Twitter and Facebook, and a circle on Google + ▫  Bookmark their blogs (or add them to a Google Reader) find them on Instagram, Pinterest, and LinkedIn and connect •  Spend 30 minutes interacting with some of these 20 people each week ▫  Comment on their blogs, retweet their content, @reply, share relevant info or your take on things •  Make a new list every 6 months
    • 56. My Top 5 Social Media Hacks - Efficiency Tools 1.  Content Strategy + Editorial Calendar 2.  Automate – postings, interconnect networks 3.  Digg Reader for curated content 4.  Stalker list to build relationships 5.  Get Visual
    • 57. My Final Tip: Cross Pollinate •  Bring Some Personal into your Professional ▫  Pick 1-2 things you want to be known for – things you love –  Unless you’re a sword swallower or an astronaut, your personal life is more interesting than your professional life –  LinkedIn, Blog, Twitter •  Bring some Professional into your Personal ▫  Keep yourself top of mind ▫  Every once in a while post a win, or a why you do the things you do, or an interesting take on an article ▫  Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter •  Build credibility with recommendations (and testimonials) ▫  Website, LinkedIn
    • 58. THANK YOU! Robeen Frank 72U – 72andSunny April 8, 2014 robeenf.com robeenf@gmail.com

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