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Vss Online Courses Go Open Sourcev4

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Virtual School Symposium 2009 Presentation: Online Courses Go Open Source. Rob Darrow, David Wiley, Joshua Marks.

Virtual School Symposium 2009 Presentation: Online Courses Go Open Source. Rob Darrow, David Wiley, Joshua Marks.

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  • 1. Online Courses Go Open Source
    Virtual School Symposium 2009
    http://vss2009.wikispaces.com/darrow
    David Wiley, Utah Open High School (http://openhighschool.org/)
    Rob Darrow, Clovis Online School, Central California (www.clovisonlineschool.com)
    Joshua Marks, Chief Technology Officer, Curriki (www.curriki.org)
  • 2. Who we are and how we got connected.
    David
    Rob
    Joshua
  • 5. Open Online School of Utah- David Wiley
    A Moonshot for Bloom’s 2 Sigma Challenge
  • 6. Bloom’s 2 Sigma Challenge
    Bloom, 1984
    CC BY
  • 7. One-to-One Tutoring
    And other methods compared to 30 students in the classroom
    CC BY
  • 8. Average Tutored Student by 2 SD
    In other words, the average student is capable of much more
    CC BY
  • 9. Tutoring is Expensive
    So we teach class instead!
    CC BY
  • 10. If the research on the 2 sigma problem yields practiced methods (methods that the average teacheror school faculty can learn in a brief period of time and use with little more cost or timethan conventional instruction), it would be an educational contribution of the greatest magnitude. (p. 5)
    Bloom, 1984
    CC BY
  • 11. To Tutor Or Not to Tutor?
    That is the (false) question
    CC BY
  • 12. “Strategic Tutoring”
    What if we could do just-in-time, just-on-topic, one-on-one tutoring?
    CC BY
  • 13. Obs. 1 - Requires Great Insight
    We’d have to know who needs help, when, and what they need help with
    CC BY
  • 14. Obs. 2 - Requires Great Curriculum
    The more the student can learn from the materials, the less tutoring is required
    CC BY
  • 15. Obs. 3 - Data Is the Key
    You’d need live, fine-grained data about student, assessment, and curriculum performance
    CC BY
  • 16. Simultaneous Continuous Improvement
    Working in a way that constantly improves both student learning and the curriculum
    CC BY
  • 17. The Loop
    Curriculum Redesign
    Curriculum Use
    Data Describing Curriculum Performance
    Data Supporting Strategic Tutoring
    Student
    Performance
    Data
    CC BY
  • 18. OHSU Teaching Model
    Create and aggregate great curriculum, let it do as much instructing as possible,follow-up with “strategic tutoring”
    CC BY
  • 19. How Do You Improve Curriculum?
    Performance data alone aren’t sufficient –you need permission
    CC BY
  • 20. Open Educational Resources
    Give OHSU the permissions it needs to engage in continuous improvement
    CC BY
  • 21. OHSU Charter Requires OER
    Founders’ way of “burning the ships”
    CC BY
  • 22. Two Quick Screenshots
    From the AgilixBrainHoney system
    CC BY
  • 23. State Standards As Skeleton
    Standards provide the framework for content aggregation and assessment
    CC BY
  • 24. Restricting Access to the Bible
    Zealously and passionately
    CC BY
  • 25. Supporting Strategic Tutoring
    Data visualized in an easy to use manner
    CC BY
  • 26. When Tech and Policy Collide
    A story from history: 1000 - 1600
    CC BY
  • 27. Watch Out Bloom, Here We Come!
    OHSU is only a few weeks but the model is already proving terrifically effective
    CC BY
  • 28. Lots of Research to be Done
    We would love more research partners!
    CC BY
  • 29. Clovis Online School Background - Rob Darrow
    • A California charter school
    • 30. Grades 9 and 10.
    • 31. Will grow grades 11 and 12.
    • 32. Serving students of Central California
    • 33. Currently 65 students with 12 part time teachers
    • 34. Full time staff: principal, secretary and technology specialist
  • Course Development
    • Goal: content should be sharable
    • 35. Content Development
    • 36. Teachers complete written outline
    • 37. Organized by modules and lessons
    • 38. Each lesson (objective, introduction, lesson, assignment/assessment)
    • 39. Text first, then add multimedia elements
    • 40. Integrates into Moodle
    • 41. Starting place: clovisonlineschool.pbworks.com
  • Collaboration is the key
    • For content
    • 42. For teaching online
    • 43. For sharing ideas
    • 44. For providing best online instruction for all students
    • 45. Collaboration = better final product
    • 46. Courses always being improved
  • Content Collaboration
    • Content to go on Curriki
    • 47. Have teachers from two places collaborate with course development
    • 48. Looking for partners
  • Curriki background - Joshua Marks
    • Curriki Background
    • 49. Find, Contribute and Connect
    • 50. Any Resource Type
    • 51. Using Curriki Resources
    • 52. Aligning to Standards
    • 53. Groups Overview
    • 54. Open Source Curriculum and licensing
  • 55. Open Educational Resources
    The Briefest Possible Introduction
    David Wiley
  • 56. The Gutenberg Difference
    From slow, expensive copies
    to fast, inexpensive copies
  • 57.
  • 58. The Internet Difference
    From fast, inexpensive copies
    to instantaneous, free copies
  • 59.
  • 60. If...
    education blesses people’s lives,
    and
    we can make instant, free copies of materials,
    then
    what kind of ethical obligation do we have?
  • 61. Small (c) Problems
    Just because you can copy
    doesn’t mean you’re allowed to
  • 62. Open Educational Resources
    Hacking (c) to leverage the nonrivalrous nature of digital educational materials
  • 63. Open, adj.
    Providing users a collection of rights called “the four R’s” - for free
  • 64. The 4Rs
    Reuse - verbatim copies
    Redistribute - share copies
    Revise - make adaptations
    Remix - combinations / mashups
  • 65. Communicate 4R Permissions
    Since this overrides default copyright,only a copyright license can grant
  • 66. Offers easy to use 4Rs licenses
  • 67.
  • 68. Free = Open
    Check the “Copyright Statement” or “Terms of Use”! Without a CC license you will (likely) not have 4R permissions.
  • 69. CC Licensed Items Online (Millions)
    250
    200
    150
    100
    50
    2008
    2009
    2003
  • 70.
  • 71.
  • 72.
  • 73.
  • 74.
  • 75.
  • 76.
  • 77.
  • 78.
  • 79.
  • 80.
  • 81.
  • 82.
  • 83.
  • 84.
  • 85. Declining Budgets and No Bail Out
    More and more institutions are sharing and reusing OERs
  • 86. Challenges and Opportunities
  • 87. Questions/Contact Information
    • Rob Darrow: Robdarrow@cusd.com. 559-327-4400, (www.clovisonlineschool.com)
    • 88. Joshua Marks: jmarks@curriki.org. 831-685-3511 (www.curriki.org)
    • 89. David Wiley: david.wiley@byu.edu801-422-7071, http://davidwiley.org/
    Presentation Website:
    http://vss2009.wikispaces.com/darrow

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