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Presentation about K-12 online learning, costs, and experiences from the first year of an online charter school in California.

Presentation about K-12 online learning, costs, and experiences from the first year of an online charter school in California.

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    Online learning symposium stanislaus.darrow Online learning symposium stanislaus.darrow Presentation Transcript

    • So…You Want to Start an Online School Program?
      • Rob Darrow, Ed.D.
      • Principal, Clovis Online School
      www.ClovisOnlineSchool.com Blog: Clovisonlineschool.wordpress.com Stanislaus County Office Online Learning Symposium, June 2010
    • A Little About You
        • Teachers?
        • Administrators?
        • Have taught an online course?
        • Are working in an online school or providing online school services?
        • How many are hoping to launch some type of online learning program in the next year?
    • A Little About Me
      • Clovis, CA – Central California
      • 20 year old daughter – Junior, Cal Poly
      • Educator, 30 years (Grades K-8)
      • Teacher-Librarian and Coordinator, School Libraries
      • Project Director, Teaching American History Grant
      • Doctorate Completed at CSU Fresno
        • Topic: Online learning, charter schools and at-risk students
    • My Daughter The Digital Native Raising kids and raising an online school is similar
    • Presentation Outline
      • Components of Online Learning
      • The Cost Challenges
      • Clovis Online School Experiences
      • Questions and Answers
      • Lunch: “Table top conversation”
    • Time to Work
      • Handouts
        • Back to back – Resource List
        • One page – Online School Decision Chart
    • Online School Decision Chart
      • 5 minute Strategic Plan
      • Work with others
      • Include the costs
      • Let’s do a few together
        • Type of Online School
        • Operational Control
        • Skip down to “Students”
      • Complete the chart
    • Results
      • Discussion
    • A Little Background About Online Learning
      • Online Learning has increased at every level in every way – K-12, community college, four-year colleges, public, private, adult education in the past 10 years.
      • Number of schools
      • Number of courses
      • Number of students
    • College Enrollment
      • Growing more than 10% a year
      • Most growth at 2-year institutions (Parsad, 2008. NCES)
      • 66% of all colleges offered online courses in the 2006-2007 school year
      • Over 3.9 million students were taking at least one online course during the fall 2007
      • 20% of all U.S. higher education students were taking at least one online course in the fall of 2007. (Allen, 2008)
      Allen, I. E., & Seaman, J. (2008). Staying the course: Online education in the United States 2008. Wellesley, MA: Sloan Consortium. Parsad, B., & Lewis, L. (2008). ED. Distance education at degree-granting postsecondary institutions: 2006–07. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics, US Department of Education.
    • Online Course Definitions Allen & Seaman, 2007
    • K-12 Online Enrollment – U.S.
      • 1,030,000 K-12 students in 2007-2008.
      • Represents a 47% increase since 2005-2006.
      • 63% of public school districts in the U.S. had at least one student enrolled in either a fully online or blended course
      • A sample of K-12 OL growth across the U.S….
      Picciano, A., & Seaman, J. (2008). K–12 online learning: A 2008 follow-up of the survey of U.S. school district administrators. Sloan Consortium, Olin and Babson Colleges.
    • Watson et al, Keeping Pace . http://www.kpk12.com/ State/organization Full-time or supplemental 2007-2008 enrollment 2008-2009 enrollment Annual increase Florida Virtual School Supplemental 120,000 154,125 25% Idaho Digital Learning Academy Supplemental 6,619 9,646 46% Alabama ACCESS Supplemental 18,955 28,014 48% Michigan Virtual School Supplemental 11,000 16,000 45% Minnesota (state) Both 23,722 28,332 19% Colorado (state) Full-time 9,238 11,641 26% Ohio (state) Full-time 24,011 27,037 13% Arizona (state) Both 15,000 23,000 24% Connections Academy (across U.S.) Full-time charter 13,000 20,000 54% K12, Inc. (across U.S.) Full-time charter 39,500 56,000 42%
    • California K-12 Online Charter Enrollment 40% Increase 101% Increase 85% Increase CBEDS Data from Online Charter Schools Darrow Dissertation, 2010
    • Clayton Christensen, Michael Horn, and Curtis Johnson (2008). Disrupting Class.
      • “ By 2019 , 50% of courses taken by high school students
      • will be online .”
    • A Tipping Point
      • Online learning has reached a “tipping point”
        • Like the Internet, it’s not going away
      • The question is no longer “what”, but “when”
      • The bigger question: can we collaborate rather than compete?
    • California Finance: How public schools are funded
      • 1 student in school 1 day = 1 ADA (or FTE).
      • Cannot split ADA (unless district chooses to do so)
      • ADA Amount for each district different based on Proposition 13 formula
      • Ranges from $5,000 - $7,000
    • California School Finance Models
      • ADA (“seat time” - 240 minutes each day)
      • Independent Study (student gets hours based on work and physically meets a teacher once a week).
      • Charter
      1 student in school 1 day = 1 ADA
    • California Finance ADA Differences Per student, per year
      • Clovis USD– $5,700
      • Sierra USD- $8,100
      • Modesto USD - $6200
      • Empire USD - $5800
      • Stockton USD - $5700
    • Let’s set up a sample online program
      • An example:
      • Using a content provider for content and for teachers
    • Sample District - Revenue 30 students - ADA
      • 30 students X $5900 = $177,000 per year.
      • Special program funding - $650 per student (or another $20,000)
      • Total Income: $197,000 .
      • Round up to $200,000
    • Personnel Costs
      • Principal/Administrator – Part time
      • Secretary/lab aide (full time)
      • Custodial
      • Total Personnel Cost: $150,000
    • Computer Lab for Students to Work
      • Cost for hardware (20): $40,000
      • Does not include network/Internet access cost
    • Course Content and Teachers
      • Provided by a Content Provider: Cost: $400 per student per course.
      • 5 courses per student.
      • $400 X 30 students X 5 courses = $60,000.
    • Income and Expenses
      • Income from ADA: $200,000
      • Expenses:
        • Personnel: $150,000
        • Equipment: $40,000
        • Content and Teachers: $60,000
        • Supplies: $5,000
      • Total Expenses = $255,000
      • Result: ($55,000)
      If…
    • Clovis Online School A charter…why?
      • Two year process to decide
      • Clovis USD ADA = $5700
      • Charter School ADA = $6500
      • Fresno County HS Dropouts = 4,000
      • More and more students choosing charters
      • The millennial generation demands technology for learning and wants alternatives to traditional schooling
      • Wrote a charter in May 2008
    • Reflections about the first year of the Clovis Online School
      • Full time diploma granting online charter school
      • Opened Aug. 2009 for 9 th -10 th
      • Now registering Grades 9-12
      • Currently 80 students
      • From various school districts in Fresno County (Furthest lives about two hours)
    • About our students
      • All going to college or the world of work
      • Want alternatives to traditional school
      • Some were suspended or expelled
      • Want flexibility of time
    • 50/50
      • 9 th /10 th
      • Male/Female
      • Complete work/don’t complete work
      • Students with positive school experiences vs. negative school experiences
    • About our staff
      • Three full time staff
        • Principal, Multimedia Specialist, Administrative Secretary
      • 16 part time innovative and passionate teachers
    • Enrollment Process
      • 1. Student completes online activities
      • 2. Student/parent interviews with principal
        • Student strengths/abilities
        • Why they want to join
        • 80% student directed
        • Student choice
      • 3. Test online environment
        • Student chooses to join
      • 4. Formal enrollment
    • Technologies Used
      • Low Cost
      • Moodle
      • Wiki
      • Blog
      • Ning
      • Teacher created content
      • Windows Live (Email and IM)
      • Cost
      • Elluminate
      • Quia
      • ALEKS (math learning program)
    • The Harsh Reality
      • 80 students, but only received 40 ADA
      • Online learning is 80% student directed (vs. face-to-face learning which is 80% teacher directed)
      • Teacher transformation in thinking
      • Balance between cost and revenue
      • Some online charter schools: top teacher salary is $30,000 full time
    • Clovis Online School Purpose and Mission
      • Our Purpose
      • To provide students of Central California with an engaging and comprehensive online course delivery system that prepares them for college and the world of work.
      • Our Beliefs
      • The students, teachers, parents, administration and community of this school are a collaborative team of learners.
      • Our Direction
      • Let’s work together (Open source platform – Moodle; Open educational resources developed; Open source online learning for all students in Central California)
    • Book: The World is Open
      • “ Anyone can now learn anything from anyone at anytime”
      • Curtis Bonk (2009)
    • Use of Open Educational Resources - David Wiley
      • OERs = upfront investment, as materials are discovered or created
      • Investment can be similar to what would normally be spent acquiring commercial materials.
      • But once the investment is made…
    • Once the investment in OERs is made…
      • Ongoing costs for curriculum can be significantly lower than traditional textbook replacement and other costs.
      • Due to the "open" nature of open educational resources
        • teachers can make revisions and improvements
        • resulting in materials that are actually more effective than their more expensive commercial counterparts
    • The Challenge
      • Shall we work together or separately?
      • We have content you can use…and knowledge
      • Or do we expect every teacher to re-create their own content?
      • Or do we pay for online content providers year after year?
    • If you want to “do” online learning
      • Learn about it for yourself first by...
      • Joining iNacol
        • Virtual School Symposium Nov 14-16, Arizona
      • Reading some blogs
      • Reading resource document and resources
      • And…
    • Join Classroom 2.0 www.classroom20.com
      • Weekly web events
      • 41,000 members worldwide
    • Join E-Learning Sig: “El Sig” via CUE http:// elsighome.ning.com
      • Online Meetings
      • Second Tuesday of each month
      • 75 Members
      • California focused
    • Questions… Comments…Thoughts www.ClovisOnlineSchool.com Blog: Clovisonlineschool.wordpress.com
      • Rob Darrow – robdarrow [at] cusd.com