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Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form
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Med105 documenting facts, truth narrative form

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lecture slides for documentary session on med105 at Sunderland

lecture slides for documentary session on med105 at Sunderland

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  • Key Examples of the Reflexive Mode include:DzigaVertov'sMan with a Movie Camera (1929) - documents the mechanization of Soviet life in late 1920s - the mechanical camera and cameraman become part of the subjectThe art of making pictures is part of this "new" mechanical work and it to is part of the film - we literally at points in the film see the film being constructed Perhaps a film like Catfish or Exit Through The Gift Shop might fit this bill?
  • Transcript

    • 1. Documenting Facts? Documentary: ‘truth’ and narrative forms #med105 robert.jewitt@sunderland.ac.uk 1
    • 2. Overview  Documentary  History  Formats  Critique  Multimedia developments 2
    • 3. Documentary 3
    • 4. ‘Truth’?  The power of documentary to reveal a ‘truth’ grants it special status  To ‘document’ a subject implies keeping a factual record for future reference 4
    • 5. John Grierson (1930s-1940s) Education + Propaganda = Social reform? 5
    • 6. Expositional documentary  See Bill Nichols (1991/2004)  Tended to depict institutions, communities and traditions  Public mode of address:  Highly formal  Serious  Educational  Aimed at informing citizens in a mass democracy. 6
    • 7. Observational documentary  1950s onwards  cinema vérité (‘cinema truth’ or ‘direct cinema’)  observe and record the reality of everyday life as it happened without the usual organisational planning and structured direction 7
    • 8. Fred Wiseman High School (1968, USA) 8
    • 9. Planet Earth (BBC, 2006) 9
    • 10. Faking it? 10
    • 11. real / reality / realism 11
    • 12. Genre hybrids – ‘fly on the wall’  Paul Watson’s The Family (1974/2008)  Roger Graef’s Police (1982)  Filming events exactly as they happened  Agreeing in advance the specific subjects to be filmed  Showing the edited version to the participants, but only to ensure any factual errors may be corrected 12
    • 13. Critique  ‘To be sure, some documentarists claim to be objective – a term that seems to renounce an interpretive role. The claim may be strategic, but it is surely meaningless.  The documentarists, like any communicator in any medium makes endless choices. He (sic) selects topics, people, vistas, angles, lens, juxtapositions, sounds, words.  Each selection is an expression of his point of view, whether he is aware of it or not, whether he acknowledges it or not.’  Erik Barnouw (1993: 287) 13
    • 14. Ideological construction 14
    • 15. BBC2 (2004), Adam Curtis 15
    • 16. Contemporary developments  Genre hybridity  Deregulation of broadcasting  Competition for attention  Driving School (BBC, 1997)  11 million viewers 16
    • 17. Participatory mode  Welcomes direct engagement between filmmaker and subject(s)  Filmmaker:  becomes part of the events being recorded  is acknowledged (even celebrated) for their impact on events  Michael Moore  Nick Broomfield 17
    • 18. Reflexive mode  Acknowledges the constructed nature of documentary  Artifice is exposed  Not ‘truth’ but a reconstruction of ‘a’ truth, not ‘the’ truth  Frequently features the film-maker making the documentary  De-mystifying its processes 18
    • 19. Reflexive mode 19
    • 20. Performative mode  Emphasizes the subjective nature of the filmmaker  Polemical, evocative and aiming for affect  Morgan Spurlock  Louis Theroux  Nick Broomfield  Michael Moore 20
    • 21. Authored documentaries  Fronted by an investigative anchor who is frequently positioned at the centre of an unfolding narrative  A meta commentary (often via voice-over) on the nature of documentary making and representation as processes of construction  Deeply personal 21
    • 22. 22
    • 23. Louis and the Nazis (2003) 23
    • 24. Historical reconstructions?  Challenges posed by distance from the event:  Funding  Interviews with participants  Access to archive footage  Copyright clearance 24
    • 25. Man on Wire (2008) 25
    • 26. Ethics  Challenges posed by documenting criminal activity  Access to participants  Undercover surveillance  Honeytraps  Legality 26
    • 27. The Imposter (2012) 27
    • 28. Supersize Me (2004) 28
    • 29. Interactive documentary  Non-linear and interactive  Audience as active participant  Funding problems  Required skillset  Exhibition 29
    • 30. 30
    • 31. 31
    • 32. 32
    • 33. 33
    • 34. Summary  Long history of documentary production – origins in educating with the aims being to bring about social change.  Special power of documentary to report the ‘truth’ – to expose hidden agendas and ideological malfeasance.  However, this attempt to speak to the truth is also ideological – the film-maker selects what should be seen, structures it, etc.  Various genre transformations to draw attention to the constructed nature of the format 34
    • 35. Sources  Erik Barnouw (1993), Documentary: A History of the Non-Fiction Film, Oxford University Press  Stella Bruzzi (2000), New Documentary: a critical introduction, London: Routledge  Simon Cottle (2009) Global Crisis Reporting: Journalism in the Global Age  Bill Nichols (2004) Introduction to Documentary - 2nd Edition, Bloomington, Indiana University Press.  Amir Saeed (2007) 'Media, Racism and Islamophobia: The Representation of Islam and Muslims in the Media', Sociology Compass (1) (2007) (available at http://www.blackwellsynergy.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/j.1751-9020.2007.00039.x) 35

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