Mac351 art/progressive rock [draft]

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Draft slides for the MAC351 session

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  • Mac351 art/progressive rock [draft]

    1. 1. Progressive/art rock #mac351 1
    2. 2. Rolling Stones magazine: Greatest album of all time (2003) 2
    3. 3. I remember vividly Sergeant Pepper coming out—there was this incredible buzz of sheer disbelief. Wherever you went people would be playing it. Suddenly, with this astonishing music anything seemed possible. David Jackson (Van der Graaf Generator) 3
    4. 4. *The+ ‘progressive rock era’ can be delineated, emerging around 1967– 1969, peaking in terms of commercial and aesthetic success from 1972 to 1974, and disappearing altogether (or at least returning to the musical underground) between 1977 and 1980 -- Anderton, 2010: 418 4
    5. 5. The Big 6: Yes, Genesis, Emerson Lake and Palmer (ELP), Jethro Tull, King Crimson and Pink Floyd 5
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    11. 11. 1. Quote a classical excerpt in the midst of a song (simplistic) 2. Use a classical melody as the basis of a rock song (simplistic, no stylistic blending) 3. Create a series of rock songs conceived as units in a larger form (suites; thematic unity desirable) 4. Adopt a full classical work to a rock-style performance (classical work transformed by rock instrumentation) 5. Create a work for rock group and classical ensemble (rock group partners with orchestra; blend of both forms) 6. Using the musical language of rock, create an extended work modeled after a classical form (difficult to achieve; thematic development and structure; classical music in the language of rock) 11
    12. 12. 1. Quote a classical excerpt in the midst of a song (simplistic) 2. Use a classical melody as the basis of a rock song (simplistic, no stylistic blending) 3. Create a series of rock songs conceived as units in a larger form (suites; thematic unity desirable) 4. Adopt a full classical work to a rock-style performance (classical work transformed by rock instrumentation) 5. Create a work for rock group and classical ensemble (rock group partners with orchestra; blend of both forms) 6. Using the musical language of rock, create an extended work modeled after a classical form (difficult to achieve; thematic development and structure; classical music in the language of rock) 12
    13. 13. 1. Quote a classical excerpt in the midst of a song (simplistic) 2. Use a classical melody as the basis of a rock song (simplistic, no stylistic blending) 3. Create a series of rock songs conceived as units in a larger form (suites; thematic unity desirable) 4. Adopt a full classical work to a rock-style performance (classical work transformed by rock instrumentation) 5. Create a work for rock group and classical ensemble (rock group partners with orchestra; blend of both forms) 6. Using the musical language of rock, create an extended work modeled after a classical form (difficult to achieve; thematic development and structure; classical music in the language of rock) 13
    14. 14. 1. Quote a classical excerpt in the midst of a song (simplistic) 2. Use a classical melody as the basis of a rock song (simplistic, no stylistic blending) 3. Create a series of rock songs conceived as units in a larger form (suites; thematic unity desirable) 4. Adopt a full classical work to a rock-style performance (classical work transformed by rock instrumentation) 5. Create a work for rock group and classical ensemble (rock group partners with orchestra; blend of both forms) 6. Using the musical language of rock, create an extended work modeled after a classical form (difficult to achieve; thematic development and structure; classical music in the language of rock) 14
    15. 15. 1. Quote a classical excerpt in the midst of a song (simplistic) 2. Use a classical melody as the basis of a rock song (simplistic, no stylistic blending) 3. Create a series of rock songs conceived as units in a larger form (suites; thematic unity desirable) 4. Adopt a full classical work to a rock-style performance (classical work transformed by rock instrumentation) 5. Create a work for rock group and classical ensemble (rock group partners with orchestra; blend of both forms) 6. Using the musical language of rock, create an extended work modeled after a classical form (difficult to achieve; thematic development and structure; classical music in the language of rock) 15
    16. 16. 1. Quote a classical excerpt in the midst of a song (simplistic) 2. Use a classical melody as the basis of a rock song (simplistic, no stylistic blending) 3. Create a series of rock songs conceived as units in a larger form (suites; thematic unity desirable) 4. Adopt a full classical work to a rock-style performance (classical work transformed by rock instrumentation) 5. Create a work for rock group and classical ensemble (rock group partners with orchestra; blend of both forms) 6. Using the musical language of rock, create an extended work modeled after a classical form (difficult to achieve; thematic development and structure; classical music in the language of rock) 16
    17. 17. ‘lame affectations of a cultured sensibility’ [seeking] ‘to dignify their work, to make it acceptable for upper-class approbation’ --Miller, 1980: 347-8 17
    18. 18. ‘“artistic” modes of musical expression – themes, arrangements, harmonies and forms that drew on classical models, specifically those of the Romantic composers of the nineteenth century and the “nationalist” composers such as Bartok, Delius, Copland and Dvorak. -- Atton, 2001: 30 18
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    21. 21. 1. arrangements 2. a blending of acoustic, electric and electronic instruments 3. a mix of soft and loud musical passages 4. extended instrumental sections and solos 5. and the use of musical styles other than the American blues/rock format common to much commercially popular music in Britain, Europe and the USA in the mid-1960s. -- Lucky, 1998: 120-1 21
    22. 22. ‘a tendency to conflate “symphonic” progressive rock with progressive rock in general’ ‘symphonic orthodoxy’ Ignores: ‘aleatoric and minimalist music’, ‘riff-based space-rock’ and ‘avante-garde and jazz-inflected’ styles - Can - Hawkwind - Soft Machine 22
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    24. 24. Atton (2001: 31) refers to 3 dominant elements in the formation and development of progressive rock 1. its status as a commercial, popular music product 2. its aim to achieve ‘art’ status as an electrified form for classical music 3. the countercultural elements from which it was born 24
    25. 25. Progressive rock was intended to be both popular (‘meant for a wide audience’ and longlasting (of ‘more permanent value than the six weeks in the chart and then forget it’) --Dawbarn, Melody Maker 1969. 25
    26. 26. ‘a scale and grandeur unparalleled in rock, and its inner complexities [to] rival those of the greatest classical composers’ -- Williams, Melody Maker, 1970 26
    27. 27. By 1971, ‘the time was ripe for the development of progressive rock’. -- Palmer in DeCurtis, 2001: 243 27
    28. 28. Multimedia experience • By the mid 1970s shows became more extravagant • Huge projection screens • Strange costumes • Light shows • Huge tours 28
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