Mac309 Grassroots Democracy & the Internet

702 views

Published on

Slides used in the MAC309 Web Studies module on the role of digital democracy

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
702
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
17
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Mac309 Grassroots Democracy & the Internet

  1. 1. 1  Grassroots poli+cs, democracy  and the Internet  MAC309 
  2. 2. 2  Theories of democracy    Delibera+ve democracy    Representa+ve democracy    Pluralist democracy    Par+cipatory democracy 
  3. 3. 3  Delibera+ve democracy    ‘Delibera+ve democracy refers to a specific form of par+cipa+on: informed  discussion between individuals about issues which concern them, leading to  some form of consensus and collec+ve decision. To come to a collec+ve  decision, minds must be changed as a consequence of delibera+on: this is  the key difference between delibera+ve theories of democracy and those in  the representa+ve or direct vein.’     (Wright & Street, 2007: 850‐1) 
  4. 4. 4  Delibera+ve democracy    ‘Delibera+ve democracy refers to a specific form of par+cipa+on: informed  discussion between individuals about issues which concern them, leading to  some form of consensus and collec+ve decision. To come to a collec+ve  decision, minds must be changed as a consequence of delibera+on: this is  the key difference between delibera+ve theories of democracy and those in  the representa+ve or direct vein.’     (Wright & Street, 2007: 850‐1)    Register preferences/opinions, but also have space to discuss them 
  5. 5. 5  Representa+ve democracy    Voices are frequently mediated through poli+cal spokespersons.      They are charged with the responsibility of ac+ng in the people's interest,  but not as their proxy representa+ves;     Do not always act according to their wishes, but with enough authority to  exercise swi^ judgement in the face of changing circumstances.  
  6. 6. 6  Pluralist democracy    Pluralis+c democracy rests on the liberal no+on of se`ng aside space for  compe+ng interests and viewpoints    Frequently uneven terrain of poli+cal contest (power and economics)    However, it is inclusive featuring public contesta+on, vo+ng, lobbying,  mul+ple voices 
  7. 7. 7  Par+cipatory democracy    Aka direct democracy    Linked to community‐based decision‐making approaches to governance  (labour/trade movements and global rights ac+vists)    Calls for all members to make meaningful contribu+ons to decision‐making  rather than acquiescing to hierarchies     However, hierarchies do exist and may be masked  
  8. 8. 8    Which system of democracy does the UK fit into?    Delibera+ve democracy    Representa+ve democracy    Pluralist democracy    Par+cipatory democracy 
  9. 9. 9    Which system of democracy does the UK fit into?    Delibera+ve democracy    Representa+ve democracy?    Pluralist democracy?    Par+cipatory democracy 
  10. 10. 10  Internet’s role in shaping democra+c ac+on    2 opposing lines of thought    Can facilitate new forms of poli+cal engagement and  par+cipa+on (Web Cameron, MyBO, etc)    Internet is becoming increasingly aligned with  commercial interests (eg the priva+sa+on of Internet  content and corporate gatekeeping) and moving further  away from its original concep+on 
  11. 11. 11  Pessimism?    Dan Schiller (1999) Digital Capitalism, claims Internet networks  increasingly serve the aims of transna+onal corpora+ons via strict  priva+za+on of content and unregulated transborder data flow.    Lawrence Lessig (2001; 2002; 2004; 2008), laments the death of  the public domain or the ‘commons’ at the hands of rampant  copyright extension    Net neutrality arguments 
  12. 12. 12  Op+mism?    ‘Despite commercial encroachment, internet technology has opened up  poli+cal opportuni+es for par+cipatory democracy and bomom‐up poli+cal  forms’ (Pickard, 2008: 627)     Enabled previously marginalised voices to engage with electoral poli+cs,  thus reinvigora+ng civil society     Emergence of Internet‐based ac+vism to mobilise collec+ve ac+on 
  13. 13. 13  Lowering the costs of par+cipa+on    Lower costs of organizing collec+ve ac+on offered by the internet will be  par+cularly beneficial for one type of group: those outside the boundaries of  tradi+onal private and public ins+tu+ons, those not rooted in business,  professional or occupa+onal memberships or the cons+tuencies of exis+ng  government agencies and programs. (Bimber,1998:156)  
  14. 14. 14  Bridge the ‘digital divide’?    Claims to do so not always what they seem    O^en part of ‘a dominant discourse of capitalist consumer rela+ons and  liberal‐individualis+c poli+cs’ (Dahlberg, 2007: 838)    The Internet is promoted as an excellent tool for helping facilitate economic  and poli+cal transac+ons, rather than the cons+tu+ve space for radical  poli+cs  
  15. 15. 15    Asymmetries in offline social, cultural and economic capital lead to  asymmetries between voices online? 
  16. 16. 16  Challenge the status quo?    Rheingold (2002) ‘Smart Mobs’ using personally mediated  communica+on technology to spur on ac+on    Jewim (2005): Philippine president Joseph Estrada deposed  by mass protest groups mobilised by SMS texts.  100 million+  texts led to protest.    Pickard (2008): 1999 WTO protests in Seamle – digital  hack+vism    Cannon (2009): 2004 Spanish elec+ons ousted Aznar 
  17. 17. 17  Ideals of delibera+ve democracy    A strong democracy, enabling the voicing of different diverse views on any  issue, by publically‐orientated ci+zens who scru+nise power and become  sovereign (see Dahlberg, 2007)    Too o^en issues of funding, ideological bias and self‐interest have prevented  the mass media from mee+ng the challenge of the public sphere. 
  18. 18. 18  Ideals of delibera+ve democracy    A strong democracy, enabling the voicing of different diverse views on any  issue, by publically‐orientated ci+zens who scru+nise power and become  sovereign (see Dahlberg, 2007)    Too o^en issues of funding, ideological bias and self‐interest have prevented  the mass media from mee+ng the challenge of the public sphere.    Internet as ‘public sphere’ (a^er Habermas) 
  19. 19. 19  Ideals of delibera+ve democracy    A strong democracy, enabling the voicing of different diverse views on any  issue, by publically‐orientated ci+zens who scru+nise power and become  sovereign (see Dahlberg, 2007)    Too o^en issues of funding, ideological bias and self‐interest have prevented  the mass media from mee+ng the challenge of the public sphere.    ‘offering ci+zens the opportunity to encounter and engage with a huge  diversity of posi+ons, thus extending the public sphere’ (Dahlberg, 2007:  828)  
  20. 20. 20 
  21. 21. 21  Fragmented public?    ‘much online interac+on simply involves the mee+ng of “like‐minded”  individuals’ (Dahlberg, 2007: 828) who fall into ‘delibera+ve enclaves’     Produces a fragmented sphere of debate    Similar interests flock together, repeat and reinforce exis+ng beliefs    Filter info; users ‘self‐select’ material they are comfortable with; bookmark  or subscribe to sites which reinforce their pos++on 
  22. 22. 22  Contested public?    ‘internet users are not insula+ng themselves in informa+on echo chambers.   Instead, they are exposed to more poli+cal arguments than nonusers  (Horrigan et al, 2004: i‐ii)    Search for arguments, but work towards ra+onale debate?  
  23. 23. 23  Task    Visit some of the following sites (see next few slides)    What kinds of democra+c ac+on are each of these sites enabling?    To what extent are they successful in enabling democra+c ac+on?    How do they encourage par+cipa+on?    Read Barack Obama’s social media toolkit (on WebCT)    What does this tell you about the poten+al for Internet plauorms to engage the  public in par+cipatory democra+c ac+on? 
  24. 24. 24  The Associa+on for Progressive  Communica+ons  www.apc.org  
  25. 25. 25  Witness www.witness.org  
  26. 26. 26  openDemocracy  hmp://www.opendemocracy.net/  
  27. 27. 27  e‐democracy hmp://e‐democracy.org/  
  28. 28. 28  e‐democracy UK www.e‐democracy.org/uk/  
  29. 29. 29  Centre for Digital Democracy  hmp://www.democra+cmedia.org/  
  30. 30. 30  Open Forum  hmp://www.openforum.com.au/  
  31. 31. 31  Human Rights Interest hmp://www.hri.ca/  
  32. 32. 32  IndyMedia www.indymedia.org  
  33. 33. 33  Global Voices  hmp://globalvoicesonline.org/  
  34. 34. 34  Stop the War www.stopwar.org.uk  
  35. 35. 35  Move On www.moveon.org  
  36. 36. 36  Sources and further reading    B. Bimber, 1998, ‘The Internet and Poli+cal Transforma+on: Populism, Community, and Accelerated Pluralism’, Polity  31(1):133–60.    L. Dahlberg, 2007, ‘Rethinking the fragmenta+on of the cyberpublic: from consensus to contesta+on’, New Media &  Society, Vol 9, No 5: 827‐ 847    Edelman, 2009, ‘The Social Pulpit: Barack Obama’s Social Media Toolkit’,  hmp://www.edelman.com/image/insights/content/Social%20Pulpit%20‐%20Barack%20Obamas%20Social%20Media %20Toolkit%201.09.pdf     R. Jewim, 2005  'Mobile Networks ‐ Globalisa+on, networks and the mobile phone' in C. Cornut‐Gen+lle (ed), Culture  and Power: Culture and Society In The Age of GlobalisaCon, Prensas Universitarias de Zaragoza, Spain.     S. Marmura, 2008, ‘A net advantage? The internet, grassroots ac+vism and American Middle‐Eastern Policy’, New  Media & Society, Vol 10, No 2: 247‐271    Z. Papacharissi, 2002, ‘The virtual sphere: The internet as a public sphere’, New Media & Society, Vol 4, No 1: 9‐27    V. Pickard, 2008, ‘Coopta+on and coopera+on: ins+tu+onal exemplers of democra+c internet technology’, Vol 10, No  4: 625‐645.    H. Rheingold, 1993, The Virtual Community: hmp://www.rheingold.com/vc/book/4.html     H. Rheingold, 2002, Smart Mobs: The next social revoluCon, Perseus Books    M. A. Wall, 2007, ‘Social movements and email: expressions of online iden+ty in the globaliza+on protests’, New  Media & Society, Vol 9, No 2: 258‐277.    S. Wright & J. Street, 2007, ‘Democracy, delibera+on and design: the case of online discussion forums’, New Media &  Society, Vol 9, No 5: 849‐869 

×