Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
The Pirate’s Dilemma: 
Compe3ng with piracy 




                         MAC309 
                             1 
‘War on piracy’ 
•  Aggressive rhetoric of the content industry in 
   recent years 
•  Adamant that piracy ‘threatens’ th...
Can the war be won? 
•  Maybe not… 
•  If that is the case, what can be done? 

•  Wage a more vigorous war and make 
   e...
Piracy as ‘punk capitalism’ 
•  Piracy can mean illegality 
•  Piracy can also mean innova3on 
•  Piracy will not go away,...
Let’s go crazy 
•  February 2007 
•  Stephanie Lenz and her 13 month old son 
   Holden 
•  Uploaded video to YouTube 
•  ...
Copyright history 
     USA 19th Century 
• 
     Founding fathers ignored European patents 
• 
     USA known as bootlegg...
Copyright history 
     John Philip Sousa 
• 
     Composer 
• 
     June 1906; Library of Congress 
• 
     Tes3fied about...
New technologies; old laws 
•  Player piano; gramophone 
•  Mechanical music had copied 
   original work 
•  Ar3sts weren...
•  “When I was a boy … in front of every 
   house in the summer evenings you would 
   find young people together singing ...
Technology transformed our 
relaBonship to culture 




  Amateur           Consumer 


                              11 
Technologies of consumpBon 
•  Culture would be  
  –  less inclusive 
  –  less crea3ve 
  –  less par3cipatory 
  –  les...
20th century 


•  Cultural produc3on con3nued to be 
   professionalised 
•  Huge growth in media/cultural industries 
• ...
Successive technologies of 
consumpBon 
                                         1900 
Sheet music/live instruments 

  Pl...
•  Once again, new digital technologies are 
   transforming our rela3onship with culture. 




                          ...
Net GeneraBon 
•  “The ability to remix media, hack products, or 
   otherwise tamper with consumer culture is 
   their b...
Now? 

Amateur 



Consumer 
            17 
Culture as a 2‐way street 




                             18 
19 
The infinite album? 




                      20 
Digital data 
•  Internet facilitates new forms of 
   communica3on and data exchange 
  –  Piracy creates chaos 
  –  Pir...
Copyright out of control? 




                             22 
Pirates…. 
1.  Look for gaps outside the market 

2.  Create a platorm 

3.  Harness the power of people (ie the 
    cons...
P2P 
     networks 
 Music 
industry  


                 24 
P2P 
             networks 
 Music 
industry 

   iTunes 

                         25 
Music industry 


    iTunes 


   eMusic 


   Amazon 




    P2P 
  networks 



                  26 
UK music market 1997‐2008 (millions) 

200 

150 

100 
 50 
                                                             ...
The Prisoner’s Dilemma 
     Game theory 
• 
     Economists use to predict markets 
• 
     Developed in 1950s by RAND co...
The Prisoner’s Dilemma 
•  Two burglars are arrested by the police, 
   separated and taken to the police sta3on. 
•  Give...
The Prisoner’s Dilemma 
                           Prisoner B stays silent      Prisoner B confesses 




Prisoner A stays...
•  In reality, people frequently help others out 
   without seeking reward 
•  Not always self mo3vated 
  –  Linux? 
  –...
The Pirate’s Dilemma 
•  Similar to Prisoner’s Dilemma 
•  2 compe3ng organisa3ons in same market 
   under threat from a ...
The Pirate’s Dilemma                                                    Mason, 2008 



                             Playe...
InnovaBon? 




              34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
Michael Masnick:  
The Trent Reznor case study 
•  hWp://www.youtube.com/watch?
   v=Njuo1puB1lg  




                   ...
40 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
How might the content industries go 
forward?  
•  Microsop and piracy? 
•  Burberry and piracy? 
•  Books and piracy? 


...
Piracy 



Microsop 




            Linux 

                      50 
51 
52 
Cited and related links 
•  Valve Exec Explains How To Compete With Piracy  
   hWp://www.techdirt.com/ar3cles/
   2009021...
Sources 
•  Lawrence Lessig, 2004, Free Culture: The nature and future 
   of crea2vity, London: Penguin 
   www.free‐cult...
Mac309 Compete With Piracy
Mac309 Compete With Piracy
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Mac309 Compete With Piracy

2,717

Published on

MAC309 slides. Drawing on the recent work of Lessig (2004, 2006, 2008) and Mason (2008), the session looks at some of the problems associated with 21st century copyright and piracy. Draws on material covered in MAC281 - see my tags for details

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,717
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
47
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Mac309 Compete With Piracy"

  1. 1. The Pirate’s Dilemma:  Compe3ng with piracy  MAC309  1 
  2. 2. ‘War on piracy’  •  Aggressive rhetoric of the content industry in  recent years  •  Adamant that piracy ‘threatens’ the ‘survival’  of culture/media industries  •  Policing of alleged copyright infringement via  legisla3on  •  Extension of copyright terms  2 
  3. 3. Can the war be won?  •  Maybe not…  •  If that is the case, what can be done?  •  Wage a more vigorous war and make  examples of kids?  •  Rethink through how copyright works in a  digital future?  3 
  4. 4. Piracy as ‘punk capitalism’  •  Piracy can mean illegality  •  Piracy can also mean innova3on  •  Piracy will not go away, so how should it be  confronted?  •  Copyright law not fit for purpose   –  (see Lessig, 2004, 2006, 2008; Mason, 2008;  TapscoW & Williams, 2008)  4 
  5. 5. Let’s go crazy  •  February 2007  •  Stephanie Lenz and her 13 month old son  Holden  •  Uploaded video to YouTube  •  Within 4 months an employee of Universal  Music Group saw it and wrote to YouTube  •  Video was taken down  See Lessig 2008  5 
  6. 6. Let’s go crazy  •  Quality?  •  Detrac3ng from sales?  •  EFF took up the case and filed a counter‐no3ce  against Universal  •  Universal’s lawyers refused to back down  •  Risk fine of $150,000  •  Is this worth Universal’s while?  •  hWp://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2008/08/judge‐ rules‐content‐owners‐must‐consider‐fair‐use‐   6 
  7. 7. Copyright history  USA 19th Century  •  Founding fathers ignored European patents  •  USA known as bootleggers  •  Referred to as ‘Janke’ (Dutch for ‘pirate’)  •  William Fox fled to West Coast form New York  •  to avoid Edison’s expensive patents  –  (Mason, 2008: 36‐7)  7 
  8. 8. Copyright history  John Philip Sousa  •  Composer  •  June 1906; Library of Congress  •  Tes3fied about the state of  •  copyright  8 
  9. 9. New technologies; old laws  •  Player piano; gramophone  •  Mechanical music had copied  original work  •  Ar3sts weren’t reimbursed  •  Sousa pushed for copyright law to  go further (but with limits)  9 
  10. 10. •  “When I was a boy … in front of every  house in the summer evenings you would  find young people together singing the  songs of the day or the old songs. Today  you hear these infernal machines going  night and day.  We will not have a vocal  cord [sic] lep.  The vocal cords will be  eliminated by a process of evolu3on, as was  the tail of man when he came from the  ape”  •  Cited in Lessig, 2008: p24‐5  10 
  11. 11. Technology transformed our  relaBonship to culture  Amateur  Consumer  11 
  12. 12. Technologies of consumpBon  •  Culture would be   –  less inclusive  –  less crea3ve  –  less par3cipatory  –  less democra3c  –  the preserve of an elite  •  Instruments were tradi3onally taught  •  Love of music developed through learning  12 
  13. 13. 20th century  •  Cultural produc3on con3nued to be  professionalised  •  Huge growth in media/cultural industries  •  Decline in par3cipa3on   13 
  14. 14. Successive technologies of  consumpBon  1900  Sheet music/live instruments  Player piano/gramophone  Radio/television  Tapes/CDs  Video/DVD  2000  Value? $626 billion  14 
  15. 15. •  Once again, new digital technologies are  transforming our rela3onship with culture.  15 
  16. 16. Net GeneraBon  •  “The ability to remix media, hack products, or  otherwise tamper with consumer culture is  their birthright, and they won't let outmoded  intellectual property laws stand in their way”  •  (TapscoW & Williams, 2008: 52)  16 
  17. 17. Now?  Amateur  Consumer  17 
  18. 18. Culture as a 2‐way street  18 
  19. 19. 19 
  20. 20. The infinite album?  20 
  21. 21. Digital data  •  Internet facilitates new forms of  communica3on and data exchange  –  Piracy creates chaos  –  Piracy forces debate  –  Piracy adds value  •  Look to the example of pirates for solu3ons?  21 
  22. 22. Copyright out of control?  22 
  23. 23. Pirates….  1.  Look for gaps outside the market  2.  Create a platorm  3.  Harness the power of people (ie the  consumer?)  23 
  24. 24. P2P  networks  Music  industry   24 
  25. 25. P2P  networks  Music  industry  iTunes  25 
  26. 26. Music industry  iTunes  eMusic  Amazon  P2P  networks  26 
  27. 27. UK music market 1997‐2008 (millions)  200  150  100  50  Singles  0  Albums  01/01/1997  01/01/1998  01/01/1999  01/01/2000  01/01/2001  01/01/2002  01/01/2003  01/01/2004  01/01/2005  01/01/2006  01/01/2007  01/01/2008  Data supplied by The Official Charts Company (BPI Press Release: 7th Jan 2009) 
  28. 28. The Prisoner’s Dilemma  Game theory  •  Economists use to predict markets  •  Developed in 1950s by RAND corpora3on  •  Behaviour determined by self‐interest  •  This idea has been a dominant force in  •  economics, poli3cal science, military strategy,  psychology, etc  28 
  29. 29. The Prisoner’s Dilemma  •  Two burglars are arrested by the police,  separated and taken to the police sta3on.  •  Given the following op3ons:  –  Confess  –  Stay silent  –  Grass (aka confesses the other’s involvement)  29 
  30. 30. The Prisoner’s Dilemma  Prisoner B stays silent  Prisoner B confesses  Prisoner A stays silent  Each serves 6 months  Prisoner B goes free  Prisoner A serves 5 years  Prisoner A confesses  Prisoner A goes free  Each serves 2 years  Prisoner B serves 5 years  30 
  31. 31. •  In reality, people frequently help others out  without seeking reward  •  Not always self mo3vated  –  Linux?  –  Non‐profit organisa3ons  –  Chari3es   –  Pirates  •  Pirate spot gaps in the market place and fill  them  31 
  32. 32. The Pirate’s Dilemma  •  Similar to Prisoner’s Dilemma  •  2 compe3ng organisa3ons in same market  under threat from a powerful force (piracy)  –  Eg EMI and Universal vs piracy  •  How do they respond?  –  Compete with each other?  –  Co‐operate?  –  Compete with piracy (ie innovate)?  32 
  33. 33. The Pirate’s Dilemma  Mason, 2008  Player B competes like a  Player B does not  pirate  compete, fights piracy  instead  Player A competes like a  • Both gain from moving  • Player A gains share of  pirate  into new market space  pirate’s market  • Each becomes more  • Player B loses market  efficient  share  • Society benefits  • Society gains moderate  value  Player A does not compete,  • Player B gains share of  • Both make profits in  fights piracy instead  pirate’s market  exis3ng market but lose  • Player A loses market  out to pirates  share  • Each stays inefficient   • Society gains moderate  • Society gains liWle value  value  33 
  34. 34. InnovaBon?  34 
  35. 35. 35 
  36. 36. 36 
  37. 37. 37 
  38. 38. 38 
  39. 39. Michael Masnick:   The Trent Reznor case study  •  hWp://www.youtube.com/watch? v=Njuo1puB1lg   39 
  40. 40. 40 
  41. 41. 41 
  42. 42. 42 
  43. 43. 43 
  44. 44. 44 
  45. 45. 45 
  46. 46. 46 
  47. 47. 47 
  48. 48. 48 
  49. 49. How might the content industries go  forward?   •  Microsop and piracy?  •  Burberry and piracy?  •  Books and piracy?  49 
  50. 50. Piracy  Microsop  Linux  50 
  51. 51. 51 
  52. 52. 52 
  53. 53. Cited and related links  •  Valve Exec Explains How To Compete With Piracy   hWp://www.techdirt.com/ar3cles/ 20090219/1124433835.shtml  •  Disney – we can compete with piracy  hWp://www.zeropaid.com/news/7726/Disney+‐+we +can+compete+with+piracy   •  Spo3fy Aims To Compete With Piracy  hWp://www.dslreports.com/shownews/Spo3fy‐Aims‐ To‐Compete‐With‐Piracy‐99999   •  Spore: most pirated game ever thanks to DRM  hWp://torrentreak.com/spore‐most‐pirated‐game‐ ever‐thanks‐to‐drm‐080913/   53 
  54. 54. Sources  •  Lawrence Lessig, 2004, Free Culture: The nature and future  of crea2vity, London: Penguin  www.free‐culture.cc/freeculture.pdf   •  Lawrence Lessig, 2006, Code Version 2.0, New York: Perseus  hWp://pdf.codev2.cc/Lessig‐Codev2.pdf   •  Lawrence Lessig, 2008, Remix: Making art and commerce  thrive in the hybrid economy, London: Bloomsbury  •  MaW Mason, 2008, The Pirate’s Dilemma: How hackers,  punk capitalists and graffi2 millionaires are remixing our  culture and changing the world, London: Allen Lane  •  Don TapscoW & Anthony D. Williams, 2008, Wikinomics:  How mass collabora2on changes everything, London:  Atlan3c Books  54 

×