Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Mac281 Wikinomics And Colloborative Production

1,144

Published on

Slides used in the Level 2 Cyberculture lecture on mass collaboration. some formatting errors have occurred in the upload. Supporting blog post: …

Slides used in the Level 2 Cyberculture lecture on mass collaboration. some formatting errors have occurred in the upload. Supporting blog post: http://www.remedialthoughts.com/2009/03/era-of-mass-collaboration.html

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,144
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
22
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Wikinomics: the era of  collabora3ve produc3on  MAC281  robert.jewi1@sunderland.ac.uk   1 
  • 2. Overview  1.  Tradi<onal forms of collabora<ve ac<on  2.  New forms of collabora<on  3.  Case study 1: IBM and Linux  4.  Case study 2: Encyclopaedia Britannica and  Wikipedia  2 
  • 3. 1: Tradi3onal forms of collabora3ve ac3on  20th century  •  Large scale projects  •  Typically hierarchical  •  Top‐down model  •  Typically state or market led   •  –  (see Shirky, 2008)  3 
  • 4. 4 
  • 5. Government  steering group  Project lead  (eg IBM)  DVLA  Passports  HMCR  NI  NHS  Consultants  Consultants  Consultants  Consultants  Consultants  Doc control  Doc control  Doc control  Doc control  Doc control  Tech roll out  Tech roll out  Tech roll out  Tech roll out  Tech roll out  Test  Test  Test  Test  Test  5 
  • 6. UK broadband network  Source: UK Govt Digital Britain report, January 2009  6 
  • 7. Government led?  7 
  • 8. Market led?  8 
  • 9. Common elements  •  Hierarchal networks  func<on in a top‐down  manner  •  Stakeholders come together in temporary  networks to work towards the projects  comple<on, before separa<ng  9 
  • 10. 2: New forms of collabora3on  •  21st century  •  Mass collabora<on  •  Democra<c par<cipa<on   10 
  • 11. Wisdom of crowds?  •  Crowds be1er at decision making than  small groups of experts  –  Francis Galton  –  Plymouth, 1906  –  Weight of oxen  –  Crowd more accurate taken as a whole  than individual experts  11 
  • 12. We‐think?  •  Sharing of informa<on via Internet  –  improves crea<vity  –  improves ideas  –  improves innova<on  –  improves democracy  –  h1p://www.youtube.com/watch? v=qiP79vYsgo   12 
  • 13. Crowdsourcing?  •  Outsourcing of ideas to a large  undefined group  –  open calls for help  –  the hive mind  –  collec<ve problem solving  –  cheap!  13 
  • 14. Wikinomics?  •  Peer produc<on improves business  –  openess  –  peering  –  sharing  –  ac<ng globally  14 
  • 15. Organising without organisa3ons  •  New social tools reconfigured  behaviour:  –  costs shrink   –  par<cipa<on increases  –  ‘groups that operate with a birthday  party’s informality and a mul<na<onal’s  scope’ (Shirky, 2008: 48)  15 
  • 16. 16 
  • 17. 3: Case study 1 ‐  IBM and Linux  •  1991: Linus Torvalds  •  Inspired by Richard  Stallman and the  GNU free somware  movement  17 
  • 18. •  ‘Over <me an informal organiza<on  emerged to manage ongoing development  of the somware that con<nues to harness  inputs from thousands of volunteer  programmers.  Because it was reliable and  free, Linux became a useful opera<ng  system for computers hos<ng Web servers,  and ul<mately databases, and today many  companies consider Linux an enterprise  somware keystone’   –  Tapsco1 & Williams, 2008: 24  18 
  • 19. •  1998: IBM join open source community  •  Harness the power of the crowd at a frac<on  of the cost  •  Opened up their propriety code to the  community  •  Inspected, hacked, modded, developed  19 
  • 20. The power of the crowd?  •  IBM spends about $100 million per year on  Linux development.   •  If Linux community puts in $1 billion of effort  and even half of that is useful to IBM  customers, the company gets $500 million of  somware development for their ini<al  investment   –  Tapsco1 & Williams, 2008: 83  20 
  • 21. Popular open source soMware  See h1p://sourceforge.net/     21 
  • 22. 4: Case study 2 ‐ Wikipedia  •  2000: Jimmy Wales & Larry Sanger founded   Nupedia  –  High quality online encyclopaedia  –  Managed, wri1en & reviewed by experts  –  Voluntary basis  –  7 stage review process  –  1 year in: $120000 spent; only 24 ar<cles  22 
  • 23. Added ‘wiki’ somware to Nupedia site  •  Invented by Ward Cunningham in 1995  •  Much faster to post and edit ar<cles  •  Nupedia advisory board rejected it  •  23 
  • 24. Wikipedia in figures  2001: 15,000 ar<cles  •  2009: 2.7 million+ ar<cles  •  1 million+ registered users  •  100,000 users posted 10+ ar<cles  •  75,000 regular editors  •  5,000 hardcore maintain site  •  5 paid staffers  •  –  See Tapsco1 & Williams, 2008: 72;  h1p://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/About_Wikipedia     24 
  • 25. Collabora3ve produc3on  •   “Why do people play somball?  It’s fun, it’s a  social ac<vity … We are gathering together to  build this resource that will be made available  to all the people of the world for free.  That’s a  goal people can get behind.”   –  Jimmy Wales cited in Tapsco1 & Williams, 2008:  72  25 
  • 26. Cri3cisms?  •  Reliability?  26 
  • 27. Examples of collec3ve produc3on  BitTorrent swarms  •  Second Life  •  Distributed compu<ng  •  Google search  •  Facebook  •  Li1leBigPlanet  •  27 
  • 28. Conclusion  28 
  • 29. •  21st century is the era of mass  collabora<on  •  Collabora<on benefits business  and culture alike  •  The crowd is a resource?  •  Democra<sing force?  29 
  • 30. Ques3ons  •  Do the benefits of crowdsourcing outweigh  the problems?  •  Is the future one of mass collabora<on?  30 
  • 31. Sources and reading  •  Digital Britain report, January 2009,  h1p://www.culture.gov.uk/what_we_do/broadcas<ng/5631.aspx   •  Jeff Howe, 2008, Crowdsourcing: How the Power of the Crowd is Driving  the Future of Business, London: Random House Business Books.  •  Andrew Keen, 2008, The Cult of the Amateur: How today’s Internet is  killing our culture and assaulAng our economy, London: Nicholas Brearly  Publishing  •  Charles Leadbe1er 2008, We‐Think: Mass innovaAon, not mass‐ producAon, London: Profile Books Ltd.  •  Clay Shirky, 2008: Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing  Without OrganizaAons, London: Allen Lane.  •  James Surowiecki, 2005, The Wisdom of Crowds: Why the Many Are  Smarter Than the Few, London: Abacus.  •  Don Tapsoc1 & Anthony D. Williams, 2008, Wikinomics: How Mass  CollaboraAon Changes Everything, London: Atlan<c Books  31 

×