Mac129 med102 med122 Television, video and the internet

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Lecture notes looking at the challenges to television posed by new media

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Mac129 med102 med122 Television, video and the internet

  1. 1. Television, Video & the Internet<br />MAC129 MED102<br />1<br />
  2. 2. Overview<br />Television’s changing landscape<br />The death of television<br />The saviour of television<br />Social television<br />2<br />
  3. 3. ‘Disruptive technologies’<br />Bower & Christensen (1995)<br />3<br />
  4. 4. Linear vs Non-linear<br />Linear Television: <br />Television where the viewer has to watch a scheduled programme at the time it’s offered by a broadcaster, on a particular channel.<br />4<br />
  5. 5. Linear vs Non-linear<br />Non-linear Television<br />An umbrella terms to refer to a range of different services that allow viewers to either break free from the traditional programming schedule, or interact with television content in different ways <br />5<br />
  6. 6. Linear vs Non-linear<br />Brussels<br />Economic – what will be successful and likely to generate revenue?<br />Regulation – how are the public’s best interests protected; the future of PSB and the BBC?<br />Content – what will future of content look like?<br />6<br />
  7. 7. Linear vs Non-linear<br />Brussels<br />Television Without Frontiers (2006)<br />Internet television subject to the same regulations as traditional content<br />7<br />
  8. 8. The UK?<br />2006 BBC/ICM survey:<br />43% of people who had watched video from an online or mobile source in the past week watched less regular TV as a result<br />3/4s of people watch more online content than the previous year<br />8<br />
  9. 9. The UK?<br />2006 BBC/ICM survey:<br />9% of people are regular online viewers<br />13% are occasional viewers <br />10% expect to do so in the future<br />2/3s did not watch and did not intend to in the next 12 months<br />9<br />
  10. 10. The UK?<br />2006 BBC/ICM survey:<br />16-24 year olds - 28% watching the content more than once a week<br />25-44 year olds - 10% <br />Over 45s- 4%<br />Ofcom: the number of 16-24 year olds watching television had dropped by 2.9% between 2003-2005 <br />10<br />
  11. 11. The death of television?<br />Many claims in recent years…<br />11<br />
  12. 12. The death of television?<br />12<br />
  13. 13. The death of television?<br />13<br />
  14. 14. The death of television?<br />14<br />
  15. 15. The death of television?<br />15<br />
  16. 16. The death of television?<br />16<br />“Traditional TV won't be here in seven to 10 years … It's changing so fast that I don't know if it's even going to be that long.”<br />- Kim Moses, co-producer of CBS’s Ghost Whisperer<br />
  17. 17. The Saviour of Television?<br />1000 British consumers<br />3 hour 45 mins of TV per day<br />+3% increase over past 5 years<br />17<br />
  18. 18. The Saviour of Television?<br />18<br />
  19. 19. The Saviour of Television?<br />1000 British consumers<br />31% of Internet users watched a catch-up service<br />23% in 2009<br />19% of 16-24 years olds<br />19<br />
  20. 20. The Saviour of Television?<br />1000 British consumers<br />19% of 16-24 years olds watch on a device other than a television<br />7% average amongst adults<br />20<br />
  21. 21. Defining television today?<br />‘One of the oldest elements in television’s definition was its potential for liveness … liveness … nevertheless remains a much touted capacity’<br />William Uricchio (2009: 31-2) <br />21<br />
  22. 22. Defining television today?<br />Raymond Williams (1974) on‘flow’: a temporally sequenced stream of programmes or content marking out the various contours of the day <br />22<br />
  23. 23. Defining television today?<br />Raymond Williams (1974) on‘flow’: a temporally sequenced stream of programmes or content marking out the various contours of the day <br />23<br />
  24. 24. Defining television today?<br />Aggregation of content to dispersed publics; as mass audience, subject to a collective address.<br />24<br />
  25. 25. Defining television today?<br />“Its notion of liveness is one of simulation and ‘on demand’; its embrace of flow is selective and user-generated; and its sense of community and connection is networked and drawn together through recommendation, annotation and prompts”<br />Uricchio, 2009: 35<br />25<br />
  26. 26. Across the pond<br />In 2006 US consumers spent:<br />$20 billion on television<br />$24 billion on home-video rentals and purchases<br />26<br />
  27. 27. Across the pond<br />In 2006 US consumers spent:<br />$20 billion on television<br />$24 billion on home-video rentals and purchases<br />27<br />"What's really happened is the disintegration of the traditional programming supply chain ... TV has become more of a portal into a wide range of video sources than an integrated device and service." <br />Ross Rubin, director of industry analysis for the NPD Group in Borland and Hansen, 2007<br />
  28. 28. Social television<br />Ofcom report<br />1/5 of our media time spent multitasking<br />16-24 year olds more so<br />9.5 hours of time squeezed into 6.5 per day<br />28<br />
  29. 29. Social television<br />Robin Sloan, Twitter’s Director of Media Partnerships:<br />Synchronous show tweeting<br />Social viewing<br />New kinds of content<br />29<br />
  30. 30. New platforms?<br />30<br />
  31. 31. Summary <br />Struggle to define what we mean by television now (content or platform?). Emergence of non-linear television?<br />Television content now watched across more platforms than ever before – it has enormous staying power!<br />Flexibility in mode of consumption has led to the disintegration of the supply chain – difficult to raise future capital investment in content?<br />Social media to breathe new life into old platform?<br />31<br />
  32. 32. Sources <br />BBC, 2006, ‘Online video “eroding TV viewing”’, http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/6168950.stm <br />John Borland and Evan Hansen, 2007, ‘The TV Is Dead. Long Live the TV’, Wired, http://www.wired.com/entertainment/hollywood/news/2007/04/tvhistory_0406<br />Joseph L. Bower & Clayton M. Christensen,1995, "Disruptive Technologies: Catching the Wave", Harvard Business Review, January–February <br /> Ofcom, 2010, ‘Communications Market Report’, http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/binaries/research/cmr/753567/CMR_2010_FINAL.pdf<br />Parliament, 2010, Press Notice: The British film and television industries, http://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-archive/lords-press-notices/pn250110comms/<br />Peter Warren, 2006, ‘It’s TV, but not as we know it’,http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2006/jul/06/guardianweeklytechnologysection<br />William Uricchio, 2009, ‘The Future of a Medium Once Known as Television’ in PelleSnickars and Patrick Vonderaau (eds), The YouTube Reader, National Library of Sweden<br />32<br />

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