Mac129 history of internet
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Mac129 history of internet

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Special thanks to Neil Perryman as the major source for these slides. Gone but never forgotten. Come back soon, fella!

Special thanks to Neil Perryman as the major source for these slides. Gone but never forgotten. Come back soon, fella!

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  • There are some great images you've put together, Rob! It's great to see such a thorough compilation. You've jogged my memory! Thanks.
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Mac129 history of internet Mac129 history of internet Presentation Transcript

  • MED102-MAC129A Short History of the Internet robert.jewitt@sunderland.ac.uk 1
  • 1945 - Arthur C. Clarke 1945 - Arthur C. Clarke
  • 1957 - Sputnik
  • 1958 – ARPA(Advanced Research Projects Agency)
  • 1962 - J.C.R. “Lick”  Licklider of MIT“Intergalactic Computer Network”
  • “A Network of such [computers], connectedto one another by wide-band communicationlines” which provided the “functions ofpresent-day libraries together with anticipatedadvances in information storage and retrievaland [other] symbolic functions”. ‘Man Computer Symbiosis’ JCR Licklider, 1960 6
  • RAND Corporation RAND Corporation
  • 1965 - Larry Roberts at MIT
  • Paul Baran Donald Davies Leonard Kleinrock Packet Switching
  • Kleinrock explains packet switching
  • 1967 - ARPANET
  • Bolt, Beranek and and Newman) BBN BBN (Bolt, Beranek Newman – 12
  • IMPs (Interface Message Processors)
  • 1969 14
  • October 29 th, 1969 October 29th,1969 Charley Kline - “LO” 15
  • 1971 16
  • 1971 - Ray Tomlinson 1971 - Ray Tomlinson 17
  • Vinton G. Serf
  • 1973 19
  • 1974 – Vint Cerf 1974 - Vinton Cerf Transmission Control Protocol (TCP)Internet Protocol (IP) 20
  • 1975 21
  • “This ARPA program has created no less than a revolution in computer technology and it has been one of the most successful projects everundertaken by ARPA. The full impact of thetechnical changes set in motion by this project maynot be understood for many years”. ARPANET Completion Report January 3rd, 1978 22
  • 1977Dennis C Hayes & Dale Hetherington 23
  • 1978 - First BBS 24
  • Ward Christensen & Randy SuessComputerized Bulletin Board System (CBBS)
  • 1978 26
  • 1978 - Gary ThuerkFirst spam email 27
  • 1978 - Gary Thuerk 28
  • 1979 - USENET 29
  • 1979 - MUD (Multi-User Dungeon) 30
  • MMORPG 31
  • - ) 1979 - the emoticonKevin Mackenzie 32
  • :-) 1981Scott Fahlman 33
  • <19-Sep-82 11:44 Scott E Fahlman :)From: Scott E Fahlman <Fahlman at Cmu-20c>I propose that the following character sequencefor joke markers::-)Read it sideways. Actually, it is probably moreeconomical to mark things that are NOT jokes -given current trends. For this, use:-( 34
  • 1982 - Minitel 35
  • DNS (Domain Name System) .gov, .mil, .ac.uk 1982-1984 36
  • 1985 - The Well 37
  • 2,000 hosts on the net 1985 38
  • 30,000 hosts on the net 1986 39
  • 1986 - NSFNET 40
  • Al Gore 41
  • 1988 – IRC (Internet Relay Chat) 1988 42
  • 1988 - the Morris Internet Worm 43
  • The Morris Worm 44
  • 1989 45
  • Tim Berners-Lee
  • 47 Tim Berners-Lee
  • 1990 - The World Wide Web 48
  • In 20 years the net has grown from 4 to 300,000 hosts 1990 49
  • 1 million hosts 1991 50
  • 1992 - Mosiac BrowserNCSA (National Centre for Supercomputing Applications) 51
  • Browser Wars! 52
  • 1993 – Cyberculture! 53
  • 1995 - Amazon 54
  • 1995 55
  • 1995 - Ward CumminghamFirst ʻ‘wikiʼ’ 56
  • 1997 - Jom Barger 57
  • 1988 - Google
  • 2000 – Dotcom bubble bursts March 2000 59
  • 2001 60
  • 2001 - Wikipedia 61
  • 2003 - MySpace
  • 2004 – Facebook 63
  • 2005 - YouTube 64
  • 2006 - Twitter 65
  • 2007 – Smartphone ‘revolution’