Pride not prejudice

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"A presentation exploring the application of counselling skills with young people who identify as LGB, from a youth work perspective"

A redo of a presentation I worked on for my degree... wish I'd had this instead of the powerpoint themed cack!

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  • This presentation seeks to explore a number of areas within the theme of sexual orientation, so that as practitioners we have an increased awareness of these issues, before linking the application of counselling skills when working with LGB young people. We are starting from the assumption that everyone has a level of understanding of what counselling skills are.One of the ethical principles of youth work, as suggested by the National Youth Agency is “Youth workers have a commitment to: Treat young people with respect, valuing each individual and avoiding negative discrimination.”Consider the lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) communities. It is likely that most youth workers will encounter an LGB individual at some time in their practices. Furthermore, LGB individuals tend to seek counselling more frequently than their heterosexual counterparts (Bell & Weinberg, 1978; Jones & Gabriel, 1999). Practitioner knowledge of issues specific to LGB clients has been found to relate to client satisfaction (Liddle, 1996) making increased knowledge and skills valuable. LGB people are still subject to social prejudice, discrimination, and violence. “Minority stress” is a term used by researchers (DiPlacido, 1998) to describe the cumulative negative effects associated with the prejudice, discrimination, heterosexism, violence, and other adverse social conditions experienced by individuals in stigmatized groups. There are some indications that LGB individuals may have higher rates of stress-related disorders than do their heterosexual counterparts (Meyer, 2003).“or are questioning their heterosexual orientation” is used as it is commonly believed that heterosexuality is the norm and the any other orientation is a move away from this starting place. We will be exploring this further in our presentation.
  • 5.3% 3.6 million people in the United Kingdom are either gay or lesbian. (figures taken from Observer study in 2005, DOESN’T INCLUDE BI OR TRANS GENDER)There isn’t a rock solid figure of how many openly gay or lesbian Indians are living in the UK, by taking the 5.3% figure that applies to the UK then it would be around 84, 000. (Figures taken from the 2001 census, projected that by 2008 1.6 million Indian people would be resident in the UK. It is forbidden to be talked about in Government out in Indian, and that linked with how closed they are with sexuality of any form, could cause serious issues for a young person who is coming to England and getting to grips with their identity and who they are. Problems that could arise in counselling, a counsellor who isn’t aware of the cultural differences in terms of how sexuality is seen and dealt with in India, could pose problems for the client and the counsellor.
  • Counselling does occur in these organisations. However, there is still a massive problem in sportsmen in particular “coming out”. Post Justin Faschnu, it has probably been seen as harder for male sports stars to come out, in fear of what could potentially happen to them.Over 10 years on and to this day not one football player has since come out as gay, although recent reports suggest that Sol Campbell is to marry his long term partner, but Sol has never made is sexuality known to the general public – maybe this will have a knock on effect and more and more sports stars will come out.....but playing in hostile environments, players are unlikely to come out whilst they are still playing.
  • Young people are open to the influence and opinions of society and will often struggle with their own identity development. The isolation experienced by LGB young people as a result of negative stereotyping can make it difficult for a young person to develop as gay , lesbian or bisexual during their adolescents.
  • Mental health authorities are not required to monitor the sexuality of service users. There have been studies carried out in recent years which suggest that anxiety, depression, self-harm and suicidal feelings are more common among LGB people than among heterosexual people. Reasons for these findings are complex and not yet fully understood. Poor mental health in LGB people has often been linked to experiences of homophobic discrimination and bullying.
  • Role Play YW: So what’s up you don’t seem yourself lately?S: I don’t know really?YW: Well you haven’t been with your friends as much as usual is everything ok?S: I can’t be bothered with them they are always talking about boysYW: Oh I see is it cause you don’t have a boyfriend?S: (shrug)YW: I’m sure you will get a boyfriend soon,there’s plenty of fish in the sea, maybe we could organise a disco - you know the opportunity for a slow dance (wink)S: I couldn’t think of anything worseYW: What – you don’t like dancing?S: No I don’t like boys!YW: Yeah I know they can be a right pain sometimesS: No you don’t understand what I meanYW: We all think we are not going to meet somebody but it will happen you’ll meet a nice guy someday.S: I don’t want to meet a nice guy.YW: Is it that you find it hard to speak to boys? Because I could help you with that.S: You just don’t get it do you its not about the boys its about me ....... I’m goin home.YW: Don’t worry about it’ll sort itself out – see you next week.Egan would describe that “Many responses that novice or inept helpers make are really poor substitutes for accurate empathy” By using cliché such as plenty more fish in the sea – the helper in effect is saying “you don’t really have a problem at all at least not a serious one”. The response given to Sarah by the Youth worker did not give her the opportunity to deal with her immediate anxiety and to explore her situation more fully.Egan,G. (1998) The Skilled Helper
  • Within a generic setting the young person may at first be quite reticent to seek out a listening ear from their youth worker. Worrying about whether the youth worker will be able to understand, especially if they are straight, or whether the worker will make judgement on their sexuality.If a worker is to make use of counselling skills then they should be working within Rogers core conditions of therapeutic change – and particularly the key three conditions
  • Rogers also states:‘That the right conditions are primarily when there is a complete absence of threat to the individual’ When a young person has an awareness that these conditions are right he or she will be able to confide.The skills that the youth worker could most likely offer would come from the person centred/Humanistic approach. (Again more Rogers)
  • COMPARE TO GENERIC YOUTH GROUP – why a need for specific groups? If the young person and the worker feel that the need is for more advice and guidance then the young person may well be better supported within a LGB specific group.A group such as Way Out in Oxford would be able to offer LGB young people the benefits of experience and understanding, advice and guidance on coming to terms with their sexuality and the coming out process. However accessing it could be difficult for some young people – especially those in more rural communities transport to Oxford and the confidence to get there could prove to be extremely difficult.
  • Pride not prejudice

    1. 1. PRIDENOTPREJUDICE<br />
    2. 2. WHAT’S IN A<br />LABEL?<br />
    3. 3. WELL, WHEN YOU GET<br />IT WRONG…<br />
    4. 4. …IT CAN CAUSE<br />OFFENSE…<br />
    5. 5. …WHEREAS GETTING IT RIGHT<br />DISPLAYSUNDERSTANDING<br />AND RESPECT<br />
    6. 6. LET’S THINK ABOUT<br />LGB HISTORY<br />
    7. 7. IT’S NOT A NEW CRAZE..<br />..IT’S OLD<br />
    8. 8. NOOO, I MEAN<br />REALLY OLD…<br />
    9. 9. LGB HISTORY IS… <br />12000 BCE OLD<br />
    10. 10. LET’S THINK ABOUT<br />STATISTICS<br />
    11. 11. If you’re one in ten <br />in the U.K…<br />
    12. 12. … there are 600,000<br />just like you<br />
    13. 13. 7Xs<br />
    14. 14. 73%<br />
    15. 15. 48%<br />
    16. 16. LET’S THINK ABOUT<br />CULTURE<br />
    17. 17. There are 2.5 million <br />openly gay men in India<br />
    18. 18. Sexuality <br />is a <br />taboo <br />subject<br />and not <br />openly<br />discussed <br />
    19. 19. However, arguments <br />suggest that <br />homosexuality <br />was both prevalent <br />and accepted in the <br />ancient Hindu society. <br />
    20. 20. SPORTS<br />
    21. 21. There isn’t one modern day male <br />footballer who has “come out” as gay. <br />
    22. 22. ‘butch’, ‘hairy’ and ‘manly’<br />
    23. 23. MEET ALI<br />
    24. 24. LET’S THINK ABOUT<br />HOMOPHOBIA<br />
    25. 25. HOMOPHOBIA<br />Prejudice against (fear or dislike of) <br />homosexual people and homosexuality.<br />
    26. 26. WHY FEAR?<br />
    27. 27. ‘bias shown by <br />a society or community <br />where cultural institutions and <br />individuals are conditioned to expect <br />everyone to live and behave as heterosexuals’<br />HETEROSEXISM<br />
    28. 28. INTERNALISED HOMOPHOBIA <br />CAN LEAD TO…<br />
    29. 29. ...LOW SELF-ESTEEM AND<br />FEELINGS OF SELF-HATRED<br />
    30. 30. IT IS LIKELY TO HAVE SERIOUS ADVERSE EFFECTS ON MENTAL HEALTH<br />
    31. 31. HOMOPHOBIC BULLYING<br />is the 2nd most frequent form of bullying<br />
    32. 32. MEET SARAH<br />
    33. 33. LET’S THINK ABOUT<br />GROUP WORK<br />
    34. 34. ARE WORKERS CONGRUENT<br />WITHIN THE RELATIONSHIP?<br />
    35. 35. DO YOUTH WORKERS OFFER<br />UNCONDITIONAL POSITVE REGARD<br />
    36. 36. DO YOUTH WORKERS HAVE AN<br />EMPATHIC UNDERSTANDING<br />
    37. 37. SKILLS FROM THE <br />PERSONCENTREDAPPROACH<br />
    38. 38. ACTIVE LISTENING<br />NON DIRECTIVE<br />
    39. 39. EMPATHY<br />NON JUDGEMENTAL<br />
    40. 40. LGB SPECIFIC GROUPS ?<br />WHAT ABOUT<br />
    41. 41. LET’S THINK ABOUT<br />COMING OUT<br />
    42. 42. ‘...involves a complexprocess of intra- and interpersonal transformations, often beginning in adolescence which lead to, accompany and follow events associated with acknowledgement of one’s sexual orientation’<br />Hanley-Hackenbruck (1989)<br />COMING OUT<br />
    43. 43. ISSUES FOR YOUNG PEOPLE WHEN<br />CONSIDERING ‘COMING OUT’<br />
    44. 44. JUST LIKE A FINGERPRINT<br />EVERY COMING OUT PROCESS IS<br />UNIQUE<br />
    45. 45. FROM A <br />YOUTH WORK PERSPECTIVE...<br />
    46. 46. EMPOWERMENT<br />
    47. 47. EQUALITY OF OPPORTUNITY<br />
    48. 48. MEET ALEX<br />
    49. 49. LET’S THINK ABOUT…<br />
    50. 50. CULTURE<br />
    51. 51. HOMOPHOBIA<br />
    52. 52. GROUP WORK<br />
    53. 53. COMING OUT<br />
    54. 54. LET’S THINK ABOUT<br />A BETTER<br />FUTURE<br />
    55. 55. Presentationby: Rob Elkins, Marion Harley, Amber Smith & Ed Taylor<br />Picturesfrom searches on Flickr and Google<br /> Stylistically inspired by <br />http://www.slideshare.net/jbrenman/shift-happens-33834<br />http://www.slideshare.net/chereemoore/meet-henry<br />PRIDENOTPREJUDICE<br />

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