Using Clickers In The Classroom
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Using Clickers In The Classroom

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A quick overview of some practical applications of student response systems (clickers) in the classroom. Feel free to use these slides and please post any new ideas as comments.

A quick overview of some practical applications of student response systems (clickers) in the classroom. Feel free to use these slides and please post any new ideas as comments.

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  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
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  • I gained some new ideas how to implement clickers into my elementary classroom such as using it to cue frustration levels and to have students check in when they are completed with a task. Thanks!
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  • Fantastic presentation on clickers-best I've seen. Great flow & pics. thank you
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  • In the female-identity-salient condition, participants ( n = 14) were asked (a) whether they lived on or off campus, (b) whether they had a roommate, (c) whether their floors were coed or single sex, (d) whether they preferred coed or single-sex floors, (e) to list three reasons why they would prefer a coed floor, and (f) to list three reasons why they would prefer a single-sex floor. In the Asianidentity- salient condition, participants ( n = 16) were asked (a) whether their parents or grandparents spoke any languages other than English, (b) what languages they knew, (c) what languages they spoke at home, (d) what opportunities they had to speak other languages on campus, (e) what percentage of these opportunities were found in their residence halls, and (f) how many generations of their family had lived in America. In the control condition, participants ( n = 16) were asked (a) whether they lived on or off campus, (b) whether they used the university telephone service, (c) to rate on a 7- point scale how satisfied they were with the service, (d) whether they would consider subscribing to cable television, (e) how much they would be willing to pay per month for cable television, and (f) to list one or two reasons why they would or would not subscribe to cable television.
  • In the female-identity-salient condition, participants ( n = 14) were asked (a) whether they lived on or off campus, (b) whether they had a roommate, (c) whether their floors were coed or single sex, (d) whether they preferred coed or single-sex floors, (e) to list three reasons why they would prefer a coed floor, and (f) to list three reasons why they would prefer a single-sex floor. In the Asianidentity- salient condition, participants ( n = 16) were asked (a) whether their parents or grandparents spoke any languages other than English, (b) what languages they knew, (c) what languages they spoke at home, (d) what opportunities they had to speak other languages on campus, (e) what percentage of these opportunities were found in their residence halls, and (f) how many generations of their family had lived in America. In the control condition, participants ( n = 16) were asked (a) whether they lived on or off campus, (b) whether they used the university telephone service, (c) to rate on a 7- point scale how satisfied they were with the service, (d) whether they would consider subscribing to cable television, (e) how much they would be willing to pay per month for cable television, and (f) to list one or two reasons why they would or would not subscribe to cable television.
  • In the female-identity-salient condition, participants ( n = 14) were asked (a) whether they lived on or off campus, (b) whether they had a roommate, (c) whether their floors were coed or single sex, (d) whether they preferred coed or single-sex floors, (e) to list three reasons why they would prefer a coed floor, and (f) to list three reasons why they would prefer a single-sex floor. In the Asianidentity- salient condition, participants ( n = 16) were asked (a) whether their parents or grandparents spoke any languages other than English, (b) what languages they knew, (c) what languages they spoke at home, (d) what opportunities they had to speak other languages on campus, (e) what percentage of these opportunities were found in their residence halls, and (f) how many generations of their family had lived in America. In the control condition, participants ( n = 16) were asked (a) whether they lived on or off campus, (b) whether they used the university telephone service, (c) to rate on a 7- point scale how satisfied they were with the service, (d) whether they would consider subscribing to cable television, (e) how much they would be willing to pay per month for cable television, and (f) to list one or two reasons why they would or would not subscribe to cable television.

Using Clickers In The Classroom Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Using Clickers in the Classroom
    Dr. Russell James III
    University of Georgia
  • 2. Clickers are electronic student response systems usually allowing for A,B,C,D,E, or number responses
  • 3. Clickers v. Other response systems
    C
    Everyone participates, not just the overly vocal
    Harder to just vote with majority than raising hands
    A pre-technology version gives students spiral flipbooks to hold up with pages for A, B, C, D, & E.
  • 4. OK, so what can I do with them?
  • 5. Quickly gathering information
    How many semesters of calculus have you had?
    How many countries outside North America have you visited?
    Are undecided on your major?
    Who am I?
  • 6. In class choice experiments
  • 7. Experiment Time!
    One of you will be picked to receive one of the choices you selected.
    You can receive $1.00 (cash) on the second to last day of this class.
    You can receive $1.05 (cash) on the last day of this class.
  • 8. Intervening slides followed by…
    Pick one
    You can receive $1.00 (cash) right now.
    You can receive $1.05 (cash) during the next meeting of this class.
  • 9. Class choices
    Voted to take the $1 on the next to last day of class (instead of $1.05 on the last day)?
    Fall ‘09: 32.2% (n=87)
    Spring ‘10: 35.8% (n=110)
    Voted to take $1 now (instead of $1.05 at the next class)?
    Fall ‘09: 66.3% (n=86)
    Spring ’10: 69.4% (n=111)
    Why the change? Note: Next class in 2 days. 5% difference.
    (365 days/2 days) X 5% ≈912%APR
  • 10. Comparing class survey with survey results from published studies
  • 11. Imagine that the US is preparing for the outbreak of an unusual Asian disease which is expected to kill 600 people. Choose a program to address the problem.
    A: 200 people will be saved
    B: 1/3 chance that 600 people will be saved. 2/3 chance that no people will be saved.
  • 12. Imagine that the US is preparing for the outbreak of an unusual Asian disease which is expected to kill 600 people. Choose a program to address the problem.
    Show Class Clicker Results
    A: 200 people will be saved
    B: 1/3 chance that 600 people will be saved. 2/3 chance that no people will be saved.
  • 13. Imagine that the US is preparing for the outbreak of an unusual Asian disease which is expected to kill 600 people. Choose a program to address the problem.
    Show Published Study Results
    72%
    A: 200 people will be saved
    B: 1/3 chance that 600 people will be saved. 2/3 chance that no people will be saved.
    28%
    Tversky, A. & Kahneman, D., 1981, The framing of decisions and the psychology of choice. Science, 211, 453-458.
  • 14. Imagine that the US is preparing for the outbreak of an unusual Asian disease which is expected to kill 600 people. Choose a program to address the problem.
    A: 400 people will die.
    B: 1/3 chance that nobody will die.2/3 chance that 600 people will die.
  • 15. Imagine that the US is preparing for the outbreak of an unusual Asian disease which is expected to kill 600 people. Choose a program to address the problem.
    Show Class Clicker Results
    A: 400 people will die.
    B: 1/3 chance that nobody will die.2/3 chance that 600 people will die.
  • 16. Imagine that the US is preparing for the outbreak of an unusual Asian disease which is expected to kill 600 people. Choose a program to address the problem.
    Show Published Study Results
    22%
    A: 400 people will die.
    B: 1/3 chance that nobody will die.2/3 chance that 600 people will die.
    78%
    Tversky, A. & Kahneman, D., 1981, The framing of decisions and the psychology of choice. Science, 211, 453-458.
  • 17. Did class results change as framing changed?
  • 18. 2nd Option B: 600 expected to die…
    1/3 chance that nobody will die.
    2/3 chance that 600 people will die.
    1st Option B: 600 expected to die…
    1/3 chance that 600 people will be saved.
    2/3 chance that no people will be saved.
    =
    =
    78%
    28%

    Reframing the option as a loss changed the choices
    Tversky, A. & Kahneman, D., 1981, The framing of decisions and the psychology of choice. Science, 211, 453-458.
  • 19. Recall questions: Beginning of class
    Who has read the assigned material?
  • 20. Recall questions: Middle of class
    Rewards attendance and attentiveness
    Immediate instructor feedback
    • Good responses -> Move on
    • 21. Poor responses -> Discuss more
  • Recall question with poor responses
    “Try to convince the people sitting around you that your answer is right.
    Then, answer the
    question again.”
  • 22. Recall questions End of class
    Instructor feedback for next lecture (no need to change “on the fly”)
    Multiple questions on screen possible with clickers in exam mode
  • 23. Predict the outcome of an experiment
  • 24. Describe an experiment
    Group A, B, & C female Asian-American college students were given a questionnaire followed by a math test.
    A: Gender-related questionnaire
    • Ex: 3 reasons why you might prefer a single-sex dorm
    B: Ethnicity-related questionnaire
    • Ex: did grandparents speak languages other than English?
    C: Neutral questionnaire
  • 25. Students predict experiment outcome
    Did drawing attention to issues of race or gender affect subsequent math scores?
    No effect for either
    Both gender focus and race focus lowered scores
    Both gender focus and race focus raised scores
    Gender focus raised scores; Race focus lowered scores
    Gender focus lowered scores; Race focus raised scores
  • 26. Show student predictions
    Did drawing attention to issues of race or gender affect subsequent math scores?
    No effect for either
    Both gender focus and race focus lowered scores
    Both gender focus and race focus raised scores
    Gender focus raised scores; Race focus lowered scores
    Gender focus lowered scores; Race focus raised scores
  • 27. Show experiment results and discuss
    M. Shih (Harvard), T. Pittinsky (Harvard), & N. Ambady (Harvard), 1999, Stereotype susceptibility: Identity salience and shifts in quantitative performance. Psychological Science, 10(1), 80-83.
  • 28. Click when finished with a task
    Shows when in-class writing or discussion assignments are finishing
    Can display results as received to motivate completion by peer example
  • 29. Vote
    Before and after a debate/discussion
    Vote on best student created videos
  • 30. Rate the class
    Instead of waiting until end of the semester evaluations, end every class with the same evaluation question
    Track trends, lecture topics, methodologies
  • 31. Collect student opinions to begin a discussion
  • 32. Advanced applications
    When you want to try more experiments in class!
  • 33. Individual student Socratic questioning
    “Tell me, John Smith, why was X a compelling choice for you?....... Sally Student, you answered Y. Why do you feel differently than
    John?”
  • 34. Clicker wars: The concept
    Divide students into large groups, e.g. gender, junior/senior.
    Work in teams of 2 or 3. One clicker per team.
    Winning team gets large reward. Winning group gets modest reward.
    Multiple choice questions. Wrong answer = turn off clicker, your team is out. But, you can STILL help others in the larger group.
  • 35. Clicker wars: This really works!
    Consistently the highest rated classes of the semester.
    Discuss wrong answers selected (teachable moments).
    End of section reviews or exam reviews.
  • 36. Real time tracking
    Some programs constantly track and display cumulative answer changes.
    Use separate laptop so you can see, but students can’t.
  • 37.
  • 38. Real time tracking: Confusion meter
    Click A when the current topic doesn’t make sense
    Click B if it becomes clear later
    Tracks the number of students who are currently registering confusion
  • 39. Use “rate the class” scale with instructions to click repeatedly, every slide, or every minute.
    Use screen recorder software (ex: BB Flashback, Camtasia) to record presentation from your webcam while recording your response meter screen (picture in picture) for drilling down on what sections generated what responses
    Real time “focus group” response meter
  • 40.
  • 41. High stakes, low stakes, or no stakes?
    Giving credit for clickers
  • 42. Participation only
    Relies on students' innate desire to be right
    Other ways to encourage involvement
    If record shows you are not making any effort, then partial or no credit
    Selective Socratic questioning
  • 43. Correct answers only
    Potential problem with cheating
    No multiple exam versions
    Potential problem with students who have time and a half learning disability accommodations.
  • 44. Hybrid
    Full credit if a threshold percentage of correct answers are reached.
    Correct answers only for pre-lecture questions. Participation only for mid-lecture questions.
    Clicker questions will be placed on exam.
  • 45. I forgot my clicker!
    Allow no credit or
    Allow X number of missed clicker days or
    Allow written answers turned in at end of class
  • 46. The clicker didn’t work!
    If clicker not indicating responses being received allow written responses at end of class (not later), but must show your clicker
  • 47. Preventing false participation “my best friend’s clicker”
    Take digital photos of class
    Announce and use as a deterrent
    Match with quick writing assignment
    Require each student to turn in only oneby handto you at end of class.
    TA spies looking for multiple clickers
    Counting heads
    If head count doesn’t match clicker count, assign quick writing for matching
  • 48. Slides by:
    Russell James III, J.D., Ph.D.
    University of Georgia
    2009 College of Family & Consumer Sciences Outstanding Teacher of the Year
    Feel free to use any of these slides!
    Any comments or questions to rjames@uga.edu