CEFPI 2005 Trading Spaces

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CEFPI 2005 Trading Spaces

  1. 1. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 T R A D I N G S P A C E S : transforming classrooms into spectacular learning environments
  2. 2. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 trading spaces: session abstract Transforming Existing Classrooms into Spectacular Learning Environments National studies show that over 90% of classroom teachers believe that classroom design influences students’ learning. If you suspect your school facility could better serve its students, you’re probably right. Many of the design elements cited by teachers as having strong impact on students’ performance can be improved with only a fraction of the cost of new construction or even major renovations. If you’re planning a new school or major renovation, why wait until the new school is built to provide better classrooms for your students? Today’s students deserve quality learning environments as much as those who will benefit from the new or newly renovated school. In this session, you will learn the top design elements of effective environments for learning. You will learn how to assess current facilities for educational adequacy and how to apply simple strategies to improve those elements in any classroom, regardless of its current condition. Participants can expect to learn: • Simple Strategies for Enhancing Existing School Facilities • Simple Strategies for Enhancing Classroom Atmosphere • Simple Strategies for Incorporating Technology in Existing Facilities
  3. 3. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 trading spaces: introduction Amy Yurko, AIA BrainSpaces – Ed Specs, Programming, Planning & Design Renée Thomas, RA, IESNA RTL Design – Environmental Design Strategies Craig Mason, AIA DLR Group – Full-service A/E for School Facilities John Burk, PhD Burk Consulting – Communications & Technology Consulting
  4. 4. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 trading spaces: agenda the big idea Learning Atmosphere Technology Strategies Examples Discussion
  5. 5. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 trading spaces: the big idea
  6. 6. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 trading spaces: the big idea before after Source: “Trading Spaces: Girls vs Boys” on Discovery Kids, www.kids.discovery.com
  7. 7. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 Source: “Trading Spaces: Girls vs Boys” on Discovery Kids, www.kids.discovery.com before after trading spaces: the big idea
  8. 8. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 trading spaces: the big idea Source: “Trading Spaces: Girls vs Boys” on Discovery Kids, www.kids.discovery.com before after
  9. 9. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 trading spaces: the big idea Source: “Trading Spaces: Girls vs Boys” on Discovery Kids, www.kids.discovery.com after before
  10. 10. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 trading spaces: the big idea Source: “Trading Spaces: Girls vs Boys” on Discovery Kids, www.kids.discovery.com before after
  11. 11. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 trading spaces: the big idea Thornebrooke Elementary School’s teachers lounge boasts an institutional feel prior to its PTA- sponsored makeover by several savvy parents. before In honor of Teacher Appreciation Week, the teachers lounge at Thornebrook Elementary School is transformed into a cozy retreat that exudes an ambience of tranquility. after
  12. 12. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 trading spaces: the big idea
  13. 13. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 • • • • trading spaces: the big idea
  14. 14. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 learning trends: “For students to thrive, they need a learning environment that engages and challenges them to reach their individual potential.” SOURCE – The Secretary's School Initiative: Student Engagement and Options, www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ovae/pi/hsinit/options • • • •
  15. 15. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 learning trends: Studies support the idea that learning is facilitated through hands-on & experiential projects. …of what they: 70% See, Hear & Experience 50% See & Hear 10% Read 20% Hear 30% See 90% See, Hear, Experience & Teach On average, students retain ...
  16. 16. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 learning trends: The National Educational Technology Standards (NETS) Project is an International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) initiative Student-centered learning Multi-sensory stimulation Multi-path progression Multimedia Collaborative work Student-centered learning Information exchange Active/exploratory Inquiry-based learning Proactive/planned action Authentic, real-world context New Directions for LearningTraditional Learning Teacher-centered instruction Single sense stimulation Single path progression Single media Isolated work Information delivery Passive learning Factual, knowledge-based Literal thinking Reactive response Isolated, artificial context
  17. 17. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 classroom acoustics: ANSI-ASA S12.60 2002 Engineers Newsletter 2003, Volume 32 No. 1 by Dave Guckelberger
  18. 18. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 Engineers Newsletter 2003, Volume 32 No. 1 by Dave Guckelberger classroom acoustics: Sources of Noise
  19. 19. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 Engineers Newsletter 2003, Volume 32 No. 1 by Dave Guckelberger classroom acoustics: acoustical inter-reflectance
  20. 20. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 Engineers Newsletter 2003, Volume 32 No. 1 by Dave Guckelberger classroom acoustics: speech intelligibility
  21. 21. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 Engineers Newsletter 2003, Volume 32 No. 1 by Dave Guckelberger classroom acoustics: speech intelligibility
  22. 22. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 © 2002 Daylighting Collaborative Cool Daylighting – Is an integrated approach that uses natural light to reduce the need for electric lighting, while also reducing solar heat gain and glare. daylighting the classroom: “cool daylighting”
  23. 23. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 © 2002 Daylighting Collaborative Window Placement: Too much light directly in the field of view is uncomfortable. Ideal window design uses a clerestory to let in light high (where it can bounce off the ceiling) plus lower view windows to provide a view to the outdoors. The amount of glass increases with height, bringing more usable light into the room while reducing glare. daylighting the classroom: “cool daylighting”
  24. 24. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 © 2002 Daylighting Collaborative Brightness Control: The sun, clouds, sky, and reflected light can overwhelm the eyes. These bright sources must be controlled through the use of overhangs, exterior/interior light shelves, exterior vertical fins and interior window blinds. This is especially important for view windows. daylighting the classroom: “cool daylighting”
  25. 25. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 © 2002 Daylighting Collaborative Limiting Light Transmission: Even when direct light is controlled, the sky can supply an overwhelming amount of light. This results in glare – one of the chief reasons daylighting fails. To control glare, darker glass or tinted films are specified. Visible light transmittance is limited to 0.38 – 0.60 for clerestories and 0.18 – 0.25 for view windows (depending on design conditions). daylighting the classroom: “cool daylighting”
  26. 26. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 © 2002 Daylighting Collaborative Uniform Light Distribution: Direct-indirect lighting – This type of fluorescent lighting provides direct downlighting and indirect light bounced off the ceiling plane. Daylighting sensors – Sensors in the ceiling detect luminance levels and turn off lights as needed to keep light levels constant and uniform. Wall Treatments – Lighter colored paints are used for the ceiling and for the wall near the ceiling. Darker paints may be used below. This helps to create a bright “canopy” of light out of the field of view. daylighting the classroom: “cool daylighting” strategies
  27. 27. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 educational atmosphere: studies show environmental impacts on learning • • • • classroom lighting - low/poor lighting can cause: - eye strain, increased blinking & headaches - decreased depth perception - muscular tension (neck, shoulders, etc) - fatigue, disinterest - too much lighting can cause: - eye strain , increased blinking & headaches - decreased depth perception - glare on instructional instruments (screens, boards, etc) - pull-away effect, from tasks & people - decreased attention span
  28. 28. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 transformation strategies: strategies for effective classroom lighting • • • • - indirect overhead lighting: - use ceiling surface of 90% reflectivity - optimal ceiling height = 10’ - zoned controls for flexibility - task lighting: - articulated if possible - incandescent lamps - wall & floor surfaces: - high contrast - visual interest - daylighting: - use “cool daylighting” strategies - shades to control glare
  29. 29. CEFPI - October 1, 2005SOURCE: Peter Exley: www.architectureisfun.com transformation strategies: color & light
  30. 30. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 daylighting the classroom: exterior solar controls Image courtesy of the Freidmutter Group, AIA – Las Vegas, Nevada
  31. 31. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 Images courtesy of the Heschong Mahone Group daylighting the classroom: skylighting
  32. 32. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 daylighting the classroom: side-lighting
  33. 33. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 educational technology: news flash! Source: RedEye Daily Newspaper, Chicago, October 29, 2005 • • • • …a Japanese company has developed a chip which allows broadband access through standard electrical wiring & outlets…
  34. 34. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 Campus Shared Resources WWW Campus WAN Building Shared Resources Networked Laser Printers (High speed) File Servers Fax Machine Networked Flatbed Scanner U.P.S. UPS Building LAN Copy machine High Speed Copier w/Print Server frameworks Multimedia PC Faculty Work Station for Data, Audio & Video Control Classroom LAN Digital ProjectorDigital Phone w/Intercom wireless voice/sound amplification system SmartBoard Student Laptops with wireless LAN access Multimedia PCHardwired Student Workstations (w/ power outlets) Laser printer Printer Digital Camera & Digital Camcorder Classroom educational technology: typical classroom framework
  35. 35. CEFPI - October 1, 2005Source: VECTA furniture solutions: the right furniture can maximize a small space
  36. 36. CEFPI - October 1, 2005Source: VECTA furniture solutions: the right furniture can maximize a small space
  37. 37. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 transformation strategies: in the classroom (35’ x 22’ = 770sf) PROJECT: Mellon Middle School, Burt-Hill Architects Plastic Laminate Chase to Provide Access to Data Infrastructure Telephone and Data Jacks Single Hung Windows with Blinds Storage Shelving Under Windows 29” x 42” Flat Files Teacher Cabinet Tall Storage Cabinet ADA Sink w/ Bubbler Collaborative Learning Center Media Wall Group and Individual Learning Stations Unit Vent Teacher Workstation LCD Projection Screen Tackboard and Markerboard Media Cabinet w/ TV Monitor Above T B TB TB TBTBTBTBTB
  38. 38. CEFPI - October 1, 2005PROJECT: Mellon Middle School, Burt-Hill Architects transformation strategies: in the classroom
  39. 39. CEFPI - October 1, 2005School for the Physical City, New York, Rothzeid Kaiserman Thomson & Bee transformation strategies: thematic learning
  40. 40. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 transformations: John Stanford Center, DLR Group before after
  41. 41. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 transformations: Hazen High School, DLR Group before after
  42. 42. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 transformations: Hazen High School, DLR Group before after
  43. 43. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 transformations: before Cleveland High School Study, DLR Group
  44. 44. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 transformations: Cleveland High School Study, DLR Group after
  45. 45. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 transformations: before Cleveland High School Study, DLR Group
  46. 46. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 transformations: Cleveland High School Study, DLR Group after
  47. 47. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 transformations: before Cleveland High School Study, DLR Group
  48. 48. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 transformations: Cleveland High School Study, DLR Group after
  49. 49. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 transformations: Garfield High School Study, DLR Group
  50. 50. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 transformations: Garfield High School Study, DLR Group
  51. 51. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 transformations: Garfield High School Study, DLR Group
  52. 52. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 transformations: Garfield High School Study, DLR Group
  53. 53. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 transformations: Garfield High School Study, DLR Group
  54. 54. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 transformations: Garfield High School Study, DLR Group
  55. 55. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 transformations: Timberline High School Study, DLR Group
  56. 56. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 transformations: Timberline High School Study, DLR Group
  57. 57. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 transformations: Timberline High School Study, DLR Group
  58. 58. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 transformations: Timberline High School Study, DLR Group
  59. 59. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 transformations: Timberline High School Study, DLR Group
  60. 60. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 transformations: Timberline High School Study, DLR Group
  61. 61. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 transformations: Timberline High School Study, DLR Group
  62. 62. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 transformations: Timberline High School Study, DLR Group
  63. 63. CEFPI - October 1, 2005 transformations: Hazen High School, DLR Group before after
  64. 64. CEFPI - October 1, 2005Timberline High School Study, DLR Group T R A D I N G S P A C E S : transforming classrooms into spectacular learning environments www.brainspaces.com/cefpi

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