ShAmazing
Women’s Journey
to the Rainforest
Unleashing the
Divine Feminine
  November 2009
We each heard a call from the rainforest …

To partake in a journey of the heart to rebirth the Divine Feminine at
the wom...
Our destination: The remote rainforest home of the
Achuar people in the Upper Amazon Basin of Ecuador.
The Achuar are an ancient dream culture and the
natural custodians of their rainforest home ~
a pristine rainforest with n...
As an indigenous nation, they have taken a bold stand to preserve
their rainforest and ancient culture. In partnership wit...
Our tribe of 17 “shAmazing” women on a journey of many life times!
                     Maidens and mothers traveling toge...
We gathered in the Ecuadorian capital of Quito. A city of over 1 million people
at 9,350 ft (2,850m) surrounded by active ...
Some explored the “Old
City” of Quito with its
beautiful cathedrals and
Colonial Plaza Grande
before our journey to the
ra...
Leaving Quito, we traveled by bus south taking in the beauty of this country.

We traveled down the “Avenue of the Volcano...
We were taking in the rich agriculture that would provide us
with deeply nourishing foods . . .
At Hostal Runa Huasi, we were greeted by Alonso Pillo and his family
And served a nutritious lunch of organic legumes,
vegetables, fruits, free range chickens, and love!
Mother and daughter
taught us to spin wool
Their three generations spin
and weave as a family.
Delighting in life itself, Grandmother
took great delight in our feeble
attempts to learn to spin…
Alonso and his son
demonstrated their weaving
skills, a family tradition
passed on for many
generations.

Salasacas, like ...
Late afternoon Mt Tungurahua greeted us capping the
awe inspiring landscape of the Andean highlands.
Descending the Andes to the edge of the rainforest, we join the
Pastaza River. We followed the Pastaza by bus and then by ...
On the edge of the rainforest we stayed at El Hardin Lodge in Puyo, Ecuador.
A luscious tropical setting
Where we were greeted
by macaws and parrots
of the rainforest.
Narcisa, and her husband Santiago Kawarim, greeted us for dinner.
9 months pregnant, Narcisa, told us about the Jungle Mam...
We flew AeroTsentsak into the rainforest . Tsentsak is the Achuar word for
the magic darts shamans use in their healings.
...
And we are off, shuttled in
two separate flights!
Leaving towns on the edge of the rainforest behind us,
The Amazon stretches out like one big patch of broccoli as far as the eye can
see. A land with no roads, only rivers, and ...
45 minutes later we see the beautiful Kapawi Eco-tourist Lodge.
We headed to a dirt runway along the banks
of the sprawling Pastaza River whose waters
flow to the Amazon.
We landed in the remote village of Wachirpas less than 20
miles up river from the Peruvian border.
A canoe met us in the Pastaza River below the end of the runway.
The dock showed how low the
rivers were.

Ecuador has been enduring an
extended drought that caused
power outages in Quito...
We canoed for over
                          half an hour across
                          the Pastaza and up
            ...
Along the way children played in the water and along the river banks.
Rivers are the Achuar’s primary source for transport...
Layer upon layer of greenery
and flora form the various
levels of the rainforest
canopy.
A part of our group arrives
at the Kapawi dock on the
Capahuari River.
A boardwalk of
bamboo and native
wood cuts through the
forest from the dock to
Kapawi Lodge
The 20 guest cabins at Kapawi were built by the Achuar
using ancient traditional construction techniques.
No nails or screws were used in construction. Only pegs and holes, notches
and lashes as seen in the support structure for...
Originally built on the edge of a lagoon, the rainforest is ever changing.
At the door to her cabin,
Gracie delights with her
Kapawi issued rainforest
boots.

They kept our feet dry on
wet trails w...
Kapawi is comfortably
inviting with drinkable
water in the taps         And hot showers on sunny days!
Our first afternoon at Kapawi we went for a jungle hike. Our
Achuar guides pointed out plants, inserts, birds and animals....
We saw the brilliant
                           Morpho butterfly




known for its iridescent
blue wings.
The thin nutrient layer of the
rainforest soil does not support
deep roots.

Buttressing root systems and       As are “wa...
Termites are the composters and
live in massive mud nests.




   Ferns emerge from the forest floor
Vines climb from the forest floor to the canopy above.
Throughout antiquity the
forest provided indigenous
peoples with all their needs.

Santos demonstrates how
the Achuar fold...
Celestino shows how
the Achuar use the
fibers from various
plants for building,
weaving and making
so many things –

Combs...
The Achuar rise before sun for their morning wayusa tea ceremony to
share their dreams, plan their day, and instruct their...
Our first morning, we were up at 3:30am to travel by
canoe to the village of Kusutkau for wayusa tea and to
share our drea...
During the wayusa, we
                                 learned about Achuar
                                 culture inclu...
Wooden shelves serve as beds.

One end of the house is the women’s area with a continuous fire and a
few metal pots for br...
Formerly purely hunter gatherers, the Achuar now raise chickens as
an important source of protein. A nice chicken coup …
Education is important to the Achuar. Most villages have their own
government provided school. Part of our tribe visited t...
Boys and girls attend school
taught in Spanish following a
national curriculum.

The Achuar recognized that
having Achuar ...
The Pachamama Alliance has funded training
for Achuar teachers so the Achuar could be
taught in their own language.
We were invited into one woman’s
chakra in Kusutkau.
Women tend their
chakras while singing
sacred anents to
Nunkui, spirits of the
gardens.

The main products
grown are manio...
In the chakra, we disturbed a wasp’s nest and several of our tribe were stung.
Wasp medicine is about protective nourishme...
An Achuar woman taught us how to create pottery bowls with intricate designs.
The men then judged our work and the women c...
After sharing their
crafts, sacred anents,
and ancient traditions,
our gracious hosts
served a traditional
Achuar meal on
...
We shared a few songs of our own, including our own Spanish version of “In
the jungle, the mighty jungle the jaguar sleeps...
To the laughter and delight of our hosts!
It’s not a violin ~ or a viola ~
             but she lit up the hearts of all who heard her!
Our tribe in the community long house with our hosts in Kutuskau.
Leaving Kusutkau we were blessed with our first rain in the rainforest!
Over the next few days the
rains came at the perfect time.
And added to the magic of our journey.
On November 11
we traveled by
canoe to a
shaman’s village.

At 11:11 pm
Kathleen lead a
worldwide
meditation to
unleash th...
In route to Wayusentsa
we stopped for a hike in
the forest.
We listened to
the sounds of
the birds and
the forest.

We admired
the majestic
world around
us.
Simon shared magical legends of the kapok tree and sacred Achuar traditions.
Debra spotted pink dolphins … and we continued up the river to Wayusentsa.
At sunset we visited the shaman’s house.

Mary Elizabeth brought gifts in an abalone shell
from an American shaman which w...
As we left Wayusentsa the next morning, a
swarm of butterflies hovered around the
dock. Butterflies and transformation wer...
Later in the afternoon most rested while others kayaked with pink fresh
water dolphins! The magic continues!
The sun sets on the Capahauri River bringing to close another magical day
in the rainforest.
Mary Elizabeth
celebrates a
journey of many
life times!
A love pile as our group prepares to watch Dream People of the Amazon,
the story of the Achuar and the work of The Pachama...
The morning we are leaving, Simon paints our faces with achiote paste.
Debra




                              Cassidy




Each woman gets her
own unique design.
Monica and Simon
Ashley and Joyce
Christen, Ashley, Katelyn, and Monica
Fierce hunters, the Achuar teach us how to shoot with a blowgun.
The Achuar use
“cotton” from the
Kapok tree to
create a seal so the
dart can be blown
once it is inserted
into the 9 foot ...
Christen demonstrates her warrior skills …
At the dock as …
Our first group departs Kapawi for our flight out
Taking with us the divine sweetness of the forest.
From the airstrip at Wachirpas
We take off!
We shuttle out on
three flights.
Taking with us the Divinely Feminine magic and
the blessings of the rainforest in our hearts.
Back in the airport in Shell with new and
some not so new treats.
Together
again as one
group we
wind our way
up the Andes
to Luna
Runtun with
the feminine
volcano
Tungurahua
towering
abov...
A lush mountain resort
With bountiful flowers
And a most delicious spa!
A breathtaking setting for our bathing beauties
A time for integrating, sharing our discoveries and our dreams over feasts
Of fruits and vegetables
grown on the property.
A time for basking in the love we share
           and for integrating the lessons of the rainforest.
On our last day together
we ventured up the
mountain to find the
perfect spot for our
closing ritual.
Hiking in the spirit of condor and eagle …
We created an altar
                          with sacred artifacts
                          from each of us.




Setting...
Our closing circle
Unleashing
    the
  magic
     of
    the
  Divine
Feminine!
Before boarding our bus one last time …
Passing Cotapaxi on our way back to Quito and the modern world …
We celebrate our magical journey together at Café Cultura in Quito our last
night with deep joy and gratitude for all we h...
With love and gratitude
 to our ShAmazing Tribe
for all we have shared …
          It has only just begun!
Kathleen McIntire ~ our leader and divine
                                          inspiration




                      ...
Christen Lien




Liberty BlueSkyes                   Katelyn Lyster
Sushila Mertens




Monica Niess
                                 Sarah Kell
Cassidy Rast




Whitney Kear                  Katie Rast
Debra Burke




Mary Elizabeth Young                 Gracie MacKenzie
Ashley Sears




Joyce Sears
Achuar “woman”
ShAmazing Women's Journey to Ecuador 2009
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ShAmazing Women's Journey to Ecuador 2009

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ShAmazing Women's Journey to teh Rainforest of Ecuador November 2009 to Unleash the Divine Feminine with The Pachamama Alliance

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ShAmazing Women's Journey to Ecuador 2009

  1. 1. ShAmazing Women’s Journey to the Rainforest Unleashing the Divine Feminine November 2009
  2. 2. We each heard a call from the rainforest … To partake in a journey of the heart to rebirth the Divine Feminine at the womb of our planet into the consciousness of all humanity.
  3. 3. Our destination: The remote rainforest home of the Achuar people in the Upper Amazon Basin of Ecuador.
  4. 4. The Achuar are an ancient dream culture and the natural custodians of their rainforest home ~ a pristine rainforest with no oil development, lumber or mining.
  5. 5. As an indigenous nation, they have taken a bold stand to preserve their rainforest and ancient culture. In partnership with The Pachamama Alliance, they have stood strong. We traveled with Pachamama at the invitation of the Achuar.
  6. 6. Our tribe of 17 “shAmazing” women on a journey of many life times! Maidens and mothers traveling together as sisters …
  7. 7. We gathered in the Ecuadorian capital of Quito. A city of over 1 million people at 9,350 ft (2,850m) surrounded by active volcanoes including Cototapaxi to the south, Pinchincha to the west and others north and east.
  8. 8. Some explored the “Old City” of Quito with its beautiful cathedrals and Colonial Plaza Grande before our journey to the rainforest began.
  9. 9. Leaving Quito, we traveled by bus south taking in the beauty of this country. We traveled down the “Avenue of the Volcanoes” passing Cotopaxi and other active volcanoes in route to Salasaca, an Andean indigenous community.
  10. 10. We were taking in the rich agriculture that would provide us with deeply nourishing foods . . .
  11. 11. At Hostal Runa Huasi, we were greeted by Alonso Pillo and his family
  12. 12. And served a nutritious lunch of organic legumes, vegetables, fruits, free range chickens, and love!
  13. 13. Mother and daughter taught us to spin wool
  14. 14. Their three generations spin and weave as a family.
  15. 15. Delighting in life itself, Grandmother took great delight in our feeble attempts to learn to spin…
  16. 16. Alonso and his son demonstrated their weaving skills, a family tradition passed on for many generations. Salasacas, like the Achuar, are a strong community with a bold commitment to preserve their culture and ancient ways. Their intricate designs have very specific meanings.
  17. 17. Late afternoon Mt Tungurahua greeted us capping the awe inspiring landscape of the Andean highlands.
  18. 18. Descending the Andes to the edge of the rainforest, we join the Pastaza River. We followed the Pastaza by bus and then by plane to a dirt landing strip in the remote “Oriente”.
  19. 19. On the edge of the rainforest we stayed at El Hardin Lodge in Puyo, Ecuador.
  20. 20. A luscious tropical setting
  21. 21. Where we were greeted by macaws and parrots of the rainforest.
  22. 22. Narcisa, and her husband Santiago Kawarim, greeted us for dinner. 9 months pregnant, Narcisa, told us about the Jungle Mamas project to educate Achuar women in safe maternity and infant care practices.
  23. 23. We flew AeroTsentsak into the rainforest . Tsentsak is the Achuar word for the magic darts shamans use in their healings. Having their own air service, provides the Achuar with vital access to their remote villages without building roads that would dissect the rainforest, threaten wildlife, and encourage settlement sprawl.
  24. 24. And we are off, shuttled in two separate flights!
  25. 25. Leaving towns on the edge of the rainforest behind us,
  26. 26. The Amazon stretches out like one big patch of broccoli as far as the eye can see. A land with no roads, only rivers, and trails cut by machete.
  27. 27. 45 minutes later we see the beautiful Kapawi Eco-tourist Lodge.
  28. 28. We headed to a dirt runway along the banks of the sprawling Pastaza River whose waters flow to the Amazon.
  29. 29. We landed in the remote village of Wachirpas less than 20 miles up river from the Peruvian border.
  30. 30. A canoe met us in the Pastaza River below the end of the runway.
  31. 31. The dock showed how low the rivers were. Ecuador has been enduring an extended drought that caused power outages in Quito and Puyo, dried agricultural fields in the Andes, and now leaves the rivers unseasonably low. The Achuar told us that turtle eggs are exposed and drying in the hot sun so that the numbers of turtles have drastically reduced. In years past turtles lined the logs floating in the rivers. This year we saw no turtles.
  32. 32. We canoed for over half an hour across the Pastaza and up the Capahuari River to Kapawi Lodge. The exuberance of abundant life on the river in the rainforest is contagious …
  33. 33. Along the way children played in the water and along the river banks. Rivers are the Achuar’s primary source for transportation among villages.
  34. 34. Layer upon layer of greenery and flora form the various levels of the rainforest canopy.
  35. 35. A part of our group arrives at the Kapawi dock on the Capahuari River.
  36. 36. A boardwalk of bamboo and native wood cuts through the forest from the dock to Kapawi Lodge
  37. 37. The 20 guest cabins at Kapawi were built by the Achuar using ancient traditional construction techniques.
  38. 38. No nails or screws were used in construction. Only pegs and holes, notches and lashes as seen in the support structure for the roof.
  39. 39. Originally built on the edge of a lagoon, the rainforest is ever changing.
  40. 40. At the door to her cabin, Gracie delights with her Kapawi issued rainforest boots. They kept our feet dry on wet trails whenever we left the lodge …
  41. 41. Kapawi is comfortably inviting with drinkable water in the taps And hot showers on sunny days!
  42. 42. Our first afternoon at Kapawi we went for a jungle hike. Our Achuar guides pointed out plants, inserts, birds and animals. Celestino like most Achuar we met loves to smile and laugh.
  43. 43. We saw the brilliant Morpho butterfly known for its iridescent blue wings.
  44. 44. The thin nutrient layer of the rainforest soil does not support deep roots. Buttressing root systems and As are “walking” palms which extend strangle wood growth is every new roots to follow the sunlight. where.
  45. 45. Termites are the composters and live in massive mud nests. Ferns emerge from the forest floor
  46. 46. Vines climb from the forest floor to the canopy above.
  47. 47. Throughout antiquity the forest provided indigenous peoples with all their needs. Santos demonstrates how the Achuar fold palm leaves to create thatch for traditional Achuar roofs.
  48. 48. Celestino shows how the Achuar use the fibers from various plants for building, weaving and making so many things – Combs, baskets, twine for roofs and buildings. Later he would cut walking sticks for the tribe.
  49. 49. The Achuar rise before sun for their morning wayusa tea ceremony to share their dreams, plan their day, and instruct their children.
  50. 50. Our first morning, we were up at 3:30am to travel by canoe to the village of Kusutkau for wayusa tea and to share our dreams in Achuar homes…
  51. 51. During the wayusa, we learned about Achuar culture including that marriage ceremonies occur during the wayusa ceremony. We were moved by the simplicity of life. Typical Achuar homes have no walls and little furniture. Wooden benches line the public area of the home. A few pieces of clothing hang from pegs or on lines to dry.
  52. 52. Wooden shelves serve as beds. One end of the house is the women’s area with a continuous fire and a few metal pots for brewing wayusa tea and chicha, their manioc staple.
  53. 53. Formerly purely hunter gatherers, the Achuar now raise chickens as an important source of protein. A nice chicken coup …
  54. 54. Education is important to the Achuar. Most villages have their own government provided school. Part of our tribe visited the school in Kusutkau.
  55. 55. Boys and girls attend school taught in Spanish following a national curriculum. The Achuar recognized that having Achuar teachers would help preserve their language and culture.
  56. 56. The Pachamama Alliance has funded training for Achuar teachers so the Achuar could be taught in their own language.
  57. 57. We were invited into one woman’s chakra in Kusutkau.
  58. 58. Women tend their chakras while singing sacred anents to Nunkui, spirits of the gardens. The main products grown are manioc, bananas, papaya, sweet potatoes, hot chilies, sugar cane, palms, and many medicinal and other useful plants. Manioc is their main staple which they drink as chicha. Women brew and chew the manioc which causes it to ferment mildly.
  59. 59. In the chakra, we disturbed a wasp’s nest and several of our tribe were stung. Wasp medicine is about protective nourishment and role fulfillment. It teaches the lesson of fulfilling one’s role and responsibilities, revealing how to construct and nurture our dreams.
  60. 60. An Achuar woman taught us how to create pottery bowls with intricate designs. The men then judged our work and the women corrected them!
  61. 61. After sharing their crafts, sacred anents, and ancient traditions, our gracious hosts served a traditional Achuar meal on banana leaves. The meal included fish, manioc and potato cooked in a banana leaf wrapping.
  62. 62. We shared a few songs of our own, including our own Spanish version of “In the jungle, the mighty jungle the jaguar sleeps …”
  63. 63. To the laughter and delight of our hosts!
  64. 64. It’s not a violin ~ or a viola ~ but she lit up the hearts of all who heard her!
  65. 65. Our tribe in the community long house with our hosts in Kutuskau.
  66. 66. Leaving Kusutkau we were blessed with our first rain in the rainforest!
  67. 67. Over the next few days the rains came at the perfect time.
  68. 68. And added to the magic of our journey.
  69. 69. On November 11 we traveled by canoe to a shaman’s village. At 11:11 pm Kathleen lead a worldwide meditation to unleash the Divine Feminine …
  70. 70. In route to Wayusentsa we stopped for a hike in the forest.
  71. 71. We listened to the sounds of the birds and the forest. We admired the majestic world around us.
  72. 72. Simon shared magical legends of the kapok tree and sacred Achuar traditions.
  73. 73. Debra spotted pink dolphins … and we continued up the river to Wayusentsa.
  74. 74. At sunset we visited the shaman’s house. Mary Elizabeth brought gifts in an abalone shell from an American shaman which we had blessed, Monica presented school supplies, and Christen delighted the family with her harmonica. We were touched when our host said he would be sad to see our group leave.
  75. 75. As we left Wayusentsa the next morning, a swarm of butterflies hovered around the dock. Butterflies and transformation were all around us …
  76. 76. Later in the afternoon most rested while others kayaked with pink fresh water dolphins! The magic continues!
  77. 77. The sun sets on the Capahauri River bringing to close another magical day in the rainforest.
  78. 78. Mary Elizabeth celebrates a journey of many life times!
  79. 79. A love pile as our group prepares to watch Dream People of the Amazon, the story of the Achuar and the work of The Pachamama Alliance.
  80. 80. The morning we are leaving, Simon paints our faces with achiote paste.
  81. 81. Debra Cassidy Each woman gets her own unique design.
  82. 82. Monica and Simon
  83. 83. Ashley and Joyce
  84. 84. Christen, Ashley, Katelyn, and Monica
  85. 85. Fierce hunters, the Achuar teach us how to shoot with a blowgun.
  86. 86. The Achuar use “cotton” from the Kapok tree to create a seal so the dart can be blown once it is inserted into the 9 foot long blow gun. The darts are dipped in a lethal curare poison.
  87. 87. Christen demonstrates her warrior skills …
  88. 88. At the dock as …
  89. 89. Our first group departs Kapawi for our flight out
  90. 90. Taking with us the divine sweetness of the forest.
  91. 91. From the airstrip at Wachirpas
  92. 92. We take off!
  93. 93. We shuttle out on three flights.
  94. 94. Taking with us the Divinely Feminine magic and the blessings of the rainforest in our hearts.
  95. 95. Back in the airport in Shell with new and some not so new treats.
  96. 96. Together again as one group we wind our way up the Andes to Luna Runtun with the feminine volcano Tungurahua towering above us.
  97. 97. A lush mountain resort
  98. 98. With bountiful flowers
  99. 99. And a most delicious spa!
  100. 100. A breathtaking setting for our bathing beauties
  101. 101. A time for integrating, sharing our discoveries and our dreams over feasts
  102. 102. Of fruits and vegetables grown on the property.
  103. 103. A time for basking in the love we share and for integrating the lessons of the rainforest.
  104. 104. On our last day together we ventured up the mountain to find the perfect spot for our closing ritual.
  105. 105. Hiking in the spirit of condor and eagle …
  106. 106. We created an altar with sacred artifacts from each of us. Setting our intentions, we created a healing & gratitude ceremony of the heart with music, dancing, laughter and singing.
  107. 107. Our closing circle
  108. 108. Unleashing the magic of the Divine Feminine!
  109. 109. Before boarding our bus one last time …
  110. 110. Passing Cotapaxi on our way back to Quito and the modern world …
  111. 111. We celebrate our magical journey together at Café Cultura in Quito our last night with deep joy and gratitude for all we have experienced and the sisterhood we have created!
  112. 112. With love and gratitude to our ShAmazing Tribe for all we have shared … It has only just begun!
  113. 113. Kathleen McIntire ~ our leader and divine inspiration Robin Milam ~ jaguar leader Christina “Cuqui” Serrano ~ our Ecuadorian guide who so open heartedly shares her love of her country and the Achuar!
  114. 114. Christen Lien Liberty BlueSkyes Katelyn Lyster
  115. 115. Sushila Mertens Monica Niess Sarah Kell
  116. 116. Cassidy Rast Whitney Kear Katie Rast
  117. 117. Debra Burke Mary Elizabeth Young Gracie MacKenzie
  118. 118. Ashley Sears Joyce Sears
  119. 119. Achuar “woman”
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