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Letter To The  Editor 10
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Letter To The Editor 10

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Disparate impact explanation

Disparate impact explanation

Published in: Business, Technology

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  • 1. MEMO To: Larry Simpson From: Rene Mendez Date: May 31, 2009 Re: Letter to the Editor Message: Many human resource managers and directors face the prospect of disparate impact each and every day they are recruiting for a position that has been advertised by the company/employer. Under Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) law, a less favorable effect for one group than for another, a disparate impact, results when rules applied to all employees have a different and more inhibiting effect on women and minority groups than on the majority. Additionally, employment practices that are facially neutral in their treatment of different groups but have a significantly adverse effect on a protected group must be taken into account when making decisions such as testing, interview questions, and even offering benefits. This entails having those that are tasked with employing individuals for their employers to take into account things such as asking questions that are specific to the individual’s job. For example, giving a firefighter an exam that asks the individual questions that would, as a result of an individual’s propensity to live in a suburban area, a better opportunity to answer the question, results in disparate impact. Therefore, asking questions that are specific to the job, such as, the procedures a firefighter should follow when they encounter a fire, would definitely avoid this situation. The fact remains that a certain demographic of the population, have a higher likelihood of living in a suburban area, indirectly, provides them an advantage, when answering a question as to what would be the first thing he/she would do in a major fire that might require contacting the governor for assistance, as opposed to contacting the mayor. The confirmation hearing of Judge Sotomayor will hopefully encounter a group of Senators that have taken the time to research the entire, context of a situation, as opposed to utilizing a 90- second YouTube video.