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Social Skills Training In Students With Autism
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Social Skills Training In Students With Autism

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  • 1. Social Skills Training in Students with Autism November 13, 2008 Rosalou Maxwell Presenter
  • 2. Social Skills– What do we see???
    • Challenge for students with autism
    • Difficulty seeing the perspective of others
    • Isolation from peers
    • Difficulty managing day-to-day interactions
    • Struggle with communication skills
    • Poor problem solving skills
    • Confusion with “hidden curriculum”
  • 3. Why Teach Social Skills?
    • For many students, the development of social competencies, even more than academic or vocational skills, will determine how independently they can be as adults.
    • ( Staying in the Game , Loomis)
  • 4. Steps to Success Step 1
    • 1.Assess the student’s skills
      • Informal observations throughout the day
      • Skills rating forms
        • Pragmatic checklist
        • Skill Streaming
        • Student and Parent involvement
        • Children’s Communication Checklist-2(Bishop 2003) Psychological Cooperation
        • Pragmatic Language Skills Inventory (Gilliam & Miller,2006)
  • 5. Step 2
    • 2. Decide on Social Skills needed by student
      • Review all information
      • Give priority to skills involving danger
      • Continue with classroom rules
      • Generalize to society
      • Determine the type of deficits
        • Acquisition Deficits: Students do not have “target skill”
        • Performance Deficits: Students know how to do the skill but do not perform it in one or more settings and do not use the skill consistently.
        • Fluency Deficits: Student performs the skills but does not always execute it properly.
  • 6. Step 3
    • 3. Decide on Social Goals
    • -Write the PLOP and make it specific (i.e. When Jane came into the classroom, she greeted the teacher 1 of 5 days when the teacher spoke to her)
    • -Write Goals/Benchmarks
      • Observable---Can you see it?
      • Measurable—Can you count it?
      • Define the terminology used in your goals (What does the student look like when he is angry?)
  • 7. Examples of Goals
    • 1. Jane will greet the teacher upon entering the classroom in the mornings, 4 out of 5 times by the beginning of the third nine weeks.
    • 2. Susie will stay on the topic for 3 interchanges of information on the selected topic during her resource social group on 4 of 5 opportunities.
  • 8. Goal Examples
    • Susie will stay on the topic during the group literacy time in the classroom with a visual reminder gesture given by the teacher during a 15 minute period of time on 4 of 5 days.
    • John will actively participate in a structured game for 5 minutes during recess for 3 days a week.
  • 9. Step 4
    • Determine Intervention Method/Materials
    • -Commercially Published Curriculum
    • -Teacher made curriculum
    • -DVD curriculum
    • -Small group instruction
    • -Individual instruction
    • -Whole class instruction
    • -Peer instruction
  • 10. Examples of Curriculum Materials
    • Walker Skills Curriculum
    • Skill Streaming, Research Press
    • Social Skills Training , Jed Baker, AAPC
    • The Social Skills Picture Book , Baker, Future Horizons
    • Social Skills in Our Schools , AAPC
    • Social Stories , Gray, Future Horizons
    • Power Cards, Gagnon
    • Promoting Social Success , Brooks Pub.
  • 11. Social Skills Guides
    • With Open Arms , Schlieder, AAPC
    • Relationship Development , Gutstein, www.jkp.com
    • Staying in the Game , Loomis, AAPC
    • The Hidden Curriculum , Myles, AAPC
    • Autism Spectrum Handouts , Boutot, Pro-ED
    • Practical Ideas that Really Work , Pro-ED
    • Group Treatment for Asperger Syndrome , Plural Pub.
  • 12. Websites for Social Skills
    • www.ppst.com
    • www.speakingofspeech.com
    • www.alexkelly.com
    • http://www.thegraycenter.org
    • www.dotolearn.com
    • http://www.sandbox-learning.com
    • http://www.polyxo.com
  • 13. Classroom Websites
    • www.preschoolfun.com (TEACCH work jobs)
    • www.senteacher.org (Great picture index)
    • www.setbc.org (Downloadable powerpoint books)
    • http://www.cindyautisticsupport.com (classroom website)
  • 14. Examples of DVD’s
    • Storymovies , Carol Gray, AAPC
    • Joining In , Linda Murdock, AAPC
    • Feelings
    • It’s so Much Work to Be Your Friend, PBS
    • Embracing Play, www.woodbinehouse.com
    • Intricate Minds I and II , www.coultervideo.com
    • My School Day, Super Duper
    • My Turn, Your Turn, Songs, www.rivannamusic.com
    • Video Scenes and Facial Expressions, www.speechroom.com
  • 15. Step 5
    • 5. Progress Tracking
    • Teacher Made Data Sheets
    • Graph of progress
    • Complete another Social Skills Inventory
    • Frequency counts of “appropriate behavior “ per unit of time
    • Frequency counts of “inappropriate behavior”
  • 16. Step 6
    • 6. Generalization of social skills into entire school setting
    • -Involve your general education teacher
    • - Involve peers
    • -Involve parents
  • 17. Techniques for Generalization
    • Self-monitoring strategies and social-communication assignments are useful for helping students to use their newly refined skills in other settings. (Timler, Vogel-Elias, & McGill, 2007)
    • Daily reports (Fabiano & Pleham,2003) that include 3-5 specific behaviors are a good strategy. Parents and teacher circle a “yes” or “no” to identify if a behavior did or did not occur.
  • 18. Techniques
    • Determine the level of Social Challenge for the student. (Hudson & Coffin, 2007)
      • Predictability
      • Clarity of Expectations
      • Communication demands
      • Hidden Curriculum
      • Number of participants
      • Individuals involved
      • Sensory Demands
      • Duration of Social Activities
  • 19. Tools to Make Social Situations Less Challenging
    • 1.Rule cards:
      • Proper greeting behaviors
      • Problematic behaviors to avoid
      • Play rules
      • 2. Conversational Starters
      • 3. Scripts
      • 4. Situational Fact Sheets (Written or in pictures)
      • 5. Relaxers/fidgets
      • 6. Environmental supports
      • 7. Incentives/rewards
  • 20. Successful Support for Social Success
    • Peer Mentors: More naturally occurring support
    • Adult Intervention: Levels of support
      • Monitor Level
      • Guide level
      • Intervention level
      • Gradually “fade” levels of support:
      • - Fade the amount of information given, the length of teaching sessions, the frequency of sessions
  • 21. Final Thoughts
    • The goal of any social skills training should be to make sure the student learns enough social skills so that he can function independently in the community as an adult.
    • We want the student to master sufficient social skills so that as an adult he’ll be able to “choose” how much social activity he would like in his life.
  • 22. Final Thoughts
    • “ Learning and generalizing social skills is a dynamic process. Every year there are slightly different expectations to be met if a child is to stay in the game.” ( Staying in the Game, Loomis)
    • All the team must buy into the social plan, take responsibility, and make it happen.
  • 23. Points to Ponder for Successful Social Skills Programs
    • Keep it fun.
    • Help People Become Comfortable with Unfamiliar Strategies.
    • Find Good Caring People to Collaborate With.
    • Make the Plan Fit the Individual, Not the Individual Fit the Plan.
    • Realize That the Impact of Your Efforts Will be Far Reaching.
    • ( Staying in the Game, Loomis)