Your PowerPoint sucks Learn Visual Storytelling
 

Your PowerPoint sucks Learn Visual Storytelling

on

  • 1,041 views

Powerpoint in its most common form is boring and bullets suck. Learn to use visual storytelling technique and imagery to communicate big ideas in moments. Lots of useful ideas in this presentation.

Powerpoint in its most common form is boring and bullets suck. Learn to use visual storytelling technique and imagery to communicate big ideas in moments. Lots of useful ideas in this presentation.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,041
Views on SlideShare
984
Embed Views
57

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
27
Comments
0

1 Embed 57

http://www.scoop.it 57

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Your PowerPoint sucks Learn Visual Storytelling Your PowerPoint sucks Learn Visual Storytelling Document Transcript

    • Hello  and  welcome,  thanks  for  joining  us  for  this  Webinar,  “Your  PowerPoint  Sucks”  –   and  what  you  can  do  about  it.   I’m  Mark  Gibson   I’ve  worked  in  various  B2B  sales  and  markeHng  leadership  roles  for  more  than  30   years  at  companies  including   Sun  Microsystems,  Informix  SoMware,  MicroStrategy,  and  various  Silicon  Valley   startups.  I  started  a  sales  and  markeHng  performance  consultancy  in  the  UK  8  years   ago.     For  the  past  two  years,  since  relocaHng  back  to  USA,  I  have  consulted  with   Whiteboard  Selling,  developing  whiteboard  stories  and  training  thousands  of  people   in  whiteboard  storytelling  technique.     The  idea  for  this  Webinar  came  from  a  blog  post  of  the  same  name  about  6  months  .   1  
    • In  today’s  Webinar,  I’m  hopeful  you  will  learn  something  new,  that  will  help  you   communicate  more  effecHvely  with  prospects  customers  and  colleagues.     And  I’m  interested  in  geYng  you  to  change  -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐  the  way  you  present….and  isn’t  that   the  goal  of  every  presentaHon  –  to  create  a  bias  for  acHon  and  change.     The  Webinar  is  split  into  three  10  minute  chunks.     Firstly  to  cover  some  of  the  basics  in  visual  percepHon   Secondly  to  introduce  storytelling  concepts   And  to  use  these  in  basic  visual  storytelling.   2  
    • Let  me  tell  you  a  story.     A  young  salesperson  tasted  defeat  in  his  first  sales  job.  People  didn’t  want  to  know   about  his  mainframe  products,  they  wanted  to  know  about  the  new  minicomputer.       He  then  joined  a  minicomputer  company,  Prime  Computer  and  his  fortunes   changed….people  wanted  to  know  about  his  products,  they  wanted  see  his   presentaHons  so  they  could  learn  about  the  products.     This  was  30  years  ago,  the  content  has  changed,  but  the  basic  presentaHon  form   hasn’t.     We  used  35mm  slides  in  those  days  and  the  lights  had  to  dimmed  and  people  went  to   sleep….today  we  use  much  more  sophisHcated  way  of  puYng  people  to  sleep,  it’s   called  PowerPoint.     Today  buyers  don’t  want  or  need  your  product  or  corporate  presentaHons,  they  can   get  all  of  this  and  more  in  a  couple  of  mouse  clicks.       They  are  vitally  interested  in  the  insights  you  can  bring  about  their  business,  how   they  are  doing  vs  their  compeHHon,  and  how  others  have  used  your  products  and     3  
    • The  average  PowerPoint  slide  has  40  words.   If  you  stay  awake  though  it  you  get  a  medal,     Bullet  hierarchy  for  sure,   But  not  too  small.     Then  there’s  the  dreaded  build.   A  product  image  perhaps.     Features  and  benefits  of  course     At  this  point  the  pub  is  looking  good  and  Oh,  don’t  leave  any  white  space.     It  looks  awfully  familiar,  even  though  it’s  a  spoof.     Have  a  guess  how  much  of  this  will  be  remembered  3  days  from  now?       4  
    • But  it  doesn't  have  to  be  this  way.  I  want  to  introduce  you  to  a  new  way  of  presenHng   using  story     Why  do  we  present?   -­‐  Get  some-­‐one  to  Change  –  that’s  my  goal  today.   -­‐  To  have  the  audience  interact  with  Presenter  and  the  content   What  alternaHves  to  a  presentaHon?   •  ConversaHon   •  DemonstraHon   •  Big  picture  discussion-­‐    visual  confecHon   •  Give  a  hand-­‐out  and  lead  a  conversaHon  referring  to  it   •  I  encourage  you  to  think  of  an  LCD  as  an  image  projector  only.   •  You  tell  the  story   •  You  are  the  presentaHon   •  Its  you  they  came  to  see.   In  the  visual,  you  are  the  mahout,  the  leader,  but  you  have  to  get  the  rest  of  the   organizaHon  to  change  (the  elephant).   Lets  explore  how     5  
    • I  want  to  introduce  a  few  ideas  on  visual  percepHon  that  could  change  how  you   present  informaHon.   6  
    • But  first  I  want  to  share  a  story  with  you.  When  I  was  a  young  salesman,  I  had  been   allocated  a  target  account.  No-­‐one  had  been  able  to  penetrate  this  account.     I  was  up  for  the  challenge.       We  had  developed  a  formula  at  Prime  Computer  that  had  worked  for  others,  that  I   was  keen  to  try  -­‐  it  was  the  in-­‐house  lunch  and  presentaHon.   I  made  a  walk-­‐in  cold  call  and  was  introduced  aMer  a  few  minutes  to  the  Managing   Director.  He  was  a  crusty  old  boy,  but  a  wily  business  man.     He  agreed  to  come  to  our  office  for  an  hour  and  to  have  lunch  and  to  sit  through  our   presentaHon.   The  presentaHon  went  something  like  this  -­‐  it  was  on  35mm  slides  and  the  curtains   were  closed  and  the  lights  dimmed.       Slide  1  Agenda    Slide  2  Bullets  about  us    Slide  3  Map  of  the  World    Slide  4  customers,      Slide  6  Introducing  our  wonderful  minicomputer  products  -­‐  he  was  fading,   head  dipping  down   7  
    • A  picture  is  worth  a  thousand  words.   Americans  viewing  this  Webinar  will  probably  be  feeling  either  a  posiHve  or  negaHve   emoHon  right  now.     You  see  pictures  can  tell  stories  without  a  voiceover  and  can  invoke  strong  emoHons.   This  picture  tells  the  story  of  the  outcome  of  the  recent  US  presidenHal  elecHon.     From  brain  science,  we  know  that  when  experiences  occur,  the  memory  of  the  event   is  encoded,  based  on  the  sensory  sHmulus  applied  at  the  Hme.     The  more  sHmulus,  the  stronger  the  memory.  This  elecHon  galvanized  tremendous   emoHonal  engagement…that’s  why  you  might  be  feeling  emoHonal  right  now.     This  webinar  is  about  using  pictures  to  tell  stories.  Why?  Because  our  visual  system  is   the  strongest  of  the  senses  -­‐  over  50%  of  our  brain  is  dedicated  to  processing  visual   informaHon.     Lets  look  at  some  scienHfic  research  to  back  this  up   8  
    • Researchers  have  know  about  the  superiority  of  pictures  over  text  for  more  than  100   years  in  fact  there  is  a  name  for  it  PSE     Simply  put,  the  more  visual  an  input  becomes,  the  more  likely  it  will  be  recognized   and  recalled.     In  one  experiment  subjects  were  exposed  for  10  seconds  to  2,500  images.     They  could  recall  90%  of  the  images  aMer  3  days  and  aMer  1  year  were  able  to  recall   an  astonishing  63%  of  the  images.     QuesHon:  Have  a  guess  how  much  text  or  oral  informaHon  is  remembered  aMer  3   days?   9  
    • Text  +  Oral  presentaHons  are  way  less  efficient  than  pictures  for  retaining  certain   types  of  informaHon.     If  informaHon  is  presented  orally,  people  remember  about  10%  aMer  3  days.     Add  a  picture  and  that  figure  goes  up  to  65%.     So  how  can  we  use  this  informaHon  to  improve  our  interacHon  with  prospects  and   customers…that  is  how  can  we  create  interacHons  with  clients  and  colleagues  that   sHck  and  will  be  remembered.?   10  
    • Richard  Mayer,  CogniHve  Psychologist,  explored  the  link  between  mulH-­‐media   exposure  and  learning.     The  principle  is  called  Supra  addiHve  integraHon,  the  benefits  of  mulHsensory   learning  are  greater  than  the  sum  of  the  parts.     MulH-­‐sensory  presentaHons  are  the  way  to  go.   1.  We  Learn  berer  from  words  and  pictures  than  words  alone   2.  We  Learn  berer  when  corresponding  words  and  pictures  are  presented   simultaneously   3.  Learn  berer  when  corresponding  words  and  pictures  are  close  together    vs  far   apart  on  page   4.  Learn  berer  when  extraneous  material  excluded   5.  Learn  berer  from  animaHon  and  narraHon  than  animaHon  and  on-­‐screen  txt   This  last  point  is  interesHng  and  points  to  the  rise  in  popularity  of  hand-­‐scribed  video   How  else  is  memory  affected  by  visual  sHmulus….well  there  are  many  and  we  don’t   have  Hme  for  all  of  them,  but  lets  explore  color.     11  
    • The  traffic  light  is  a  universal  metaphor.     We  want  to  use  these  colors  in  our  visual  communicaHon  to  convey  universal   meaning.     If  you  look  at  any  Whiteboard  output  from  WhiteboardSelling  and  they  have  done   more  than  400  whiteboards  for  tech  companies  they  use  just  4  colors….they  omit   orange.     I  encourage  you  to  use  these  colors  to  convey  meaning   12  
    • This  is  slightly  off  the  visual  topic,  but  there’s  no  where  else  to  put  these  next  couple   of  points,  but  they  are  highly  relevant  to  our  argument  and  come  again  from  the   book  Brain  Rules  by  John  Medina.     PresentaHons  need  to  be  carefully  sequenced.  We  know  that  the  arenHon  span  of   the  brain  is  about  10  minutes.   To  get  someone  to  pay  arenHon  for  10  minutes  you  need  a  hook.     You  have  about  30  seconds  at  the  start  of  your  meeHng  to  hook  the  other  person  to   pay  arenHon  for  10  minutes.  AMer  10  minutes,  you  need  another  30  second  hook  to   keep  them  to  engaged  for  another  10  minutes.     A  hook  is  a  story,  preferably  a  story  that  is  relevant  to  the  conversaHon  and  that   triggers  emoHons  in  the  buyer.     Finally  for  those  analysts  and  product  managers  in  the  audience  who  love  to  quote   facts.     13  
    • An  ounce  of  emoHon  outweighs  a  ton  of  facts     People  evaluate  informaHon  analyHcal  and  make  decisions  emoHonally.   EmoHons  incite  acHon,  if  you  want  people  to  change,  you  need  to  get  them   emoHonally  involved.     One  final  point  on  the  brain     14  
    • Start  your  communicaHon  off  with  the  big  idea  or  gist  of  the  conversaHon.     The  brain  processes  meaning  before  detail,  so  its  berer  to  establish  why  something  is   important  in  the  mind  of  the  listener  before  you  deliver  the  what  and  the  what   before  the  how.     With  that  primer  on  the  brain,  lets  apply  some  of  these  ideas  and  explore  storytelling.   15  
    • Why  story?     We  love  listening  to  stories.  Humans  have  been  telling  stories  and  have  been   enthralled  by  the  power  of  stories  since  civilizaHon  began.     Stories  are  the  most  powerful  way  of  delivering  informaHon.   The  greatest  stories  of  all  Hme  have  been  packaged  and  repeated  through  hundreds   of  illiterate  generaHons.     Telling  a  personal  story  at  the  outset  of  a  meeHng  can  be  extremely  effecHve  in   creaHng  rapport  and  trust.   …but  who  in  our  audience  today  starts  a  meeHng  with  a  personal  story,  could  I  take  a   quick  poll    please,  just  reply  yes  or  no  in  the  chat  box.   16  
    • Thousands  of  years  of  myth  and  legend  have  followed  a  similar  form     Its  called  the  mono-­‐myth,  because  across  cultures  and  civilizaHons,  people  have  used   the  same  structure  to  frame  and  tell  stories.     The  Hero  with  a  Thousand  faces  is  a  serious  literary  work  by  Joseph  Campbell  and   more  suited  for  a  classic  scholar  than  an  aMernoon  read  for  a  salesperson  wanHng  to   learn  more.  Fortunately  there  is  a  ton  of  stuff  on  the  Internet  that  has  been  derived   from  this  original  work.     Do  you  know  the  form?   17  
    • Its  called  The  Hero’s  Journey  and  it  follows  a  fixed  form,  although  not  every  story  will   follow  the  exact  steps.     The  hero’s  journey  is  also  the  story  of  personal  growth,  of  conquest  over  our  inner   fears  and  the  journey  we  as  humans  take  to  personal  enlightenment  and  reaching   our  human  potenHal.   When  someone  tells  a  hero’s  journey  story,  we  become  the  hero,  we  make  the   journey  with  the  hero,  which  is  why  this  structure  is  so  inspiraHonal  for  audiences   and  appealing  for  directors.     Hollywood  has  used  the  Hero’s  Journey  story  structure  for  many  years  and  there  are   mulHple  adapHons  from  the  original  Here  with  a  Thousand  Faces  for  screenwriters.     One  movie  that  nearly  everyone  knows  sHcks  to  the  lerer  of  the  formula…do  you   what  that  is?   18  
    • It’s  Star  Wars   George  Lucas  was  strongly  influenced  by  Campbell’s  ideas  in  creaHng  Star  Wars  and   they  met  and  discussed  the  plot  at  length.     It’s  the  story  of  Luke  Skywaker,  a  spirited  farm  boy  who  answers  the  call  for  help,   joins  rebel  forces  to  save  Princess  Lea  from  the  evil  Darth  Vader  and  the  galaxy  from   the  evil  death  star.     What  inspires  us  about  star  wars  and  all  movies  that  use  this  structure?     Stories  link  one  persons  heart  with  another.  Values,  beliefs  and  norms  become   intertwined.     Tell  a  story  and  people  will  be  more  recepHve  to  your  ideas.       Just  a  word  on  the  hero’s  journey     19  
    • The  place  to  start  your  journey  is  with  the  buyer,  not  the  product  or  service.     The  buyer  is  the  hero  in  all  sales  stories,  not  the  product,  company  or  salesperson.   …check  your  ego  at  the  door  if  you  want  to  tell  stories  and  you  have  to  go  first     Only  by  tuning  into  the  buyers  WIIFM  antenna  will  your  stories  resonate  with  the   buyer     So  lets  use  this  presentaHon  form  to  introduce  basic  storytelling.   20  
    • Lets  start  by  analyzing  presentaHon  form.     We  will  use  a  sparkline  to  show  the  transiHon  in  our  storytelling  from  the  World  as  it   is  –  the  status-­‐quo  to  the  world  as  it  could  be.     Every  presentaHon  and  every  story  has  a  beginning,  middle  and  an  end.     The  story  starts  with  the  status  quo.  The  first  transiHon  in  the  story  is  the  call  to   adventure  –  how  things  could  be.     The  story  or  presentaHon  will  then  then  transiHon  between  the  two  possibiliHes,  to   create  tension  and  contrast  and  engage  the  emoHons.   During  these  transiHons  we  will  engage  the  buyer  in  conversaHon  around  their  issues   to  discover  their  prioriHes  and  pain  points  and  to  outline  our  soluHon.     The  final  transiHon  is  the  call  to  acHon  and  the  desired  future  state  is  arained.       21  
    • Most  stories  follow  the  same  basic  form  and  I  encourage  to  to  use  this  one.     Remember  our  opening  slide/?     This  is  the  status  quo  –  your  presentaHon  sucks,  it’s  how  things  are  most  places.  It’s   the  World  As  Is.     NoHce  that  its  also  in  B&W.     We  used  a  few  slides  and  stories  to  set  up  the  opening,  get  you  emoHonally  engaged,   BTW,  the  introducHon  to  your  presentaHon  should  not  exceed  10%  of  the  total  Hme   allored.   22  
    • The  first  turning  point  in  the  story  is  the  Call  to  Adventure.     NoHce  also  that  we  switched  from  the  old  text  heavy  form  of  PowerPoint  into  a   simple  powerful  visual  image,  metaphor  and  stories  to  make  our  points  and  its  green,   because  green  is  goodness,  it’s  a  go  and  the  soluHon.   23  
    • In  the  middle  of  the  presentaHon  we  need  to  present  contrasHng  informaHon.   The  World  as  it  is  and  the  World  as  it  could  be.     EmoHons  +  contrast  get  engagement  and  they  create  bias  for  acHon.   24  
    • There  can  be  many  steps  in  the  middle,  but  contrast  is  important  to  juxtapose  the  AS   IS  against  the  AS  IT  COULD  BE.     We  can  create  contrast  by  telling  stories  and  using  powerful  word  pictures  to  create   emoHonal  impact.     We  can  create  contrasHng  content  using  big  pictures  and  simple  images  that  convey   meaning     and  we  can  contrast  our  delivery  using  our  physiology  or  if  we  are  on  the  phone,  our   volume,  tonality  and  pace  as  well  as  the  words  we  use.       25  
    • The  second  turning  point  in  the  story  is  a  Call  to  AcHon.     This  one  is  fairly  self  explanatory  and  it  explains  in  a  few  words  and  pictures  how  we   can  help  get  you  there.     The  first  step  is  to  create  clarity  in  your  value  message,  by  aligning  markeHng   messaging  and  sales  conversaHons  with  buyer  needs.     We  can  then  use  the  messaging  in  thought  leading  content  on  our  Website  to  drive   inbound  lead  generaHon,  and  of  course  in  visual  storytelling  to  engage  buyers  in  story   around  their  issues.   26  
    • Finally  we  need  to  end  the  presentaHon  by  sharing  results  that  others  have  achieved.     Proof  points  are  important   27  
    • According  to  a  new  study  by  analyst  firm,  Aberdeen,  New  data  shows  that  best-­‐in-­‐ class  companies  see  creaHng  more  meaningful  sales  conversaHon  as  a  top  priority…   and       those  that  use  whiteboarding  as  a  method  to  create  that  engagement  see  higher   revenue  achievement,       50%  higher  lead  conversion  rates,   29%  shorter  ramp  Hme,   And  15%  shorter  sales  cycles.   28  
    • Finally,  we  cross  the  threshold  and  our  idea  is  adopted  through  the  organizaHon.  We   encourage  using  next  steps,  starHng  with  a  meeHng  summary  to  capture  the  essence   of  your  meeHng,  along  with  the  completed  visual  confecHon  to  share  your  ideas  and   engage  stakeholder;  to  move  the  buying  group  from  concept  to  a  proposal  or   statement  of  work  and  then  to  provide  references  prior  to  contract  execuHon  and   finally    to  kick  off  a  project  with  a  new  customer.   29  
    • Let  me  tell  you  a  story.     30  
    • Once  upon  a  Hme  in  a  village  far  away  there  were  two  beauHful  sisters,  Truth  and   Story.     One  day  they  decided  to  have  a  contest  to  see  who  was  the  most  popular  of  the  two   sisters.     Truth  went  first  and  walked  though  the  village,  but  not  many  people  liked  what  they   saw,  most  of  the  people  went  inside  and  shurered  their  doors….only  a  few  looked   31  
    • Truth  was  very  upset  by  this  and  she  decided  to  take  all  of  her  clothes  off  and  walk   back  through  the  town.     This  Hme  all  the  doors  closed  Hght  and  the  windows  were  shurered…nobody  came   to  see  her.   32  
    • She  was  terribly  distraught  when  she  returned  to  her  sister  and  was  sobbing  with   shame.     Her  sister  story  told  here  to  cheer  up  and  try  on  her  magnificent  cape   33  
    • So  Truth  walked  back  through  the  town  wearing  the  beauHful  cape  of  story  and   everyone  came  out  to  see  her.     She  was  so  happy  when  she  got  back  to  her  sister  she  wept  with  joy.     Story  then  explained  to  her,  that  nobody  like  the  truth,  parHcularly  the  naked  truth.     But  when  you  cloak  truth  in  story  you  will  always  be  popular.   34  
    • Can  you  recognize  these  hand  drawn  images….what  animal  are  they?     The  brain  instantly  knows  they  are  lions,  because  the  image  of  the  lion  is  stored  in   our  brain  as  complete  object,  no  construcHon  or  interpretaHon  is  required.     These  images  are  between  30-­‐40,000  yeas  old,  the  earliest  evidence  of  the  culture  of   ice-­‐age  man  and  come  from  the  Chauvet  Cave  in  the  South  of  France.     Man  has  been  using  pictures  to  tell  stories  for  a  very  long  Hme  and  I  would  not  be   surprised  if  older  images  were  found  in  future.     In  isolaHon  they  are  recognized  instantly   35  
    • When  given  context  they  tell  a  story.     There  is  no  narraHve  to  accompany  the  cave-­‐art,  but  what  do  you  think  the  story  is   that  the  arHst  is  trying  to  tell?     I  suggest  that  it’s  a  lion  hunt.  Ice-­‐age  man  is  documenHng  the  struggle  for  survival,   compeHng  with  dangerous  animals  for  survival  in  food  chain.   On  the  leM  you  can  see  Bison  and  some  sort  of  antelope.     Can  you  see  the  Rhinocerous.     So  these  are  our  earliest  arempts  at  visual  storytelling,  but  somewhere  in  the  last   40,000  years  we  forgot  how  to  do  it  and  relied  on  machines  to  tell  our  stories!     So  where  do  we  start?     36  
    • Visual  storytelling  starts  with  the  buyer.     The  goal  is  to  engage  the  buyer  in  conversaHon  around  their  issues  and  have  your   stuff  –  your  capabiliHes  and  the  value  that  using  them  creates  in  the  buyers  context  –   unfold  naturally  in  conversaHon.   37  
    • So  how  to  construct  a  story?     The  starHng  point  for  my  visual  stories  is  with  the  buyer.     Start  by  asking  who  the  audience  is  for  your  story.   What  are  their  issues,  what’s  happening  in  their  industry,  with  compeHHon,  in  their   company,  anything  you  can  find  out  about  the  audience  that  could  be  relevant  and   important  to  the  buyer.     Figure  out  why  its  important  and  what  is  important  and  their  prioriHes.     Understand  what  alternaHves  exist  –  what  if  they  do  nothing?  How  will  that  impact   them?  Remember  doing  nothing  is  where  up  to  35%  of  forecast  deals  end  up  today,   no  decision.     How  can  you  help,  specifically  –  how  can  they  use  your  stuff.     Why  should  they  care?   38  
    • We  tell  visual  stories  in  the  same  way  we  tell  stories  in  general.     StarHng  with  rapport  and  engagement,  introducing  the  big  idea,  the  GIST     Then  establishing  the  status  quo  and  how  things  could  be.     The  body  follows  the  same  presentaHon  form  as  our  sparkline  drawing  introducing   the  buyers  issues  and  creaHng  contrast,  except  this  one  is  laid  out  verHcally.     Finally  our  resoluHon,  proof  points,  call  to  acHon  and  next  steps     Lets  put  it  into  acHon.   39  
    • Style  is  more  important  than  substance  when  you  first  meet  someone  and  mirroring   is  useful,  but  what  do  you  say  aMer  you  say  hello?     Empathy  is  a  natural  human  emoHon,  but  in  our  desensiHzed  World  of  TV  violence   and  life’s  circumstance,  it  oMen  eludes  salespeople  unHl  they  have  been  made  aware   of  it..     It  took  me  a  very  long  Hme  to  figure  this  out  and  held  back  my  selling  career.     The  fastest  way  to  develop  trust  is  by  sharing  a  story.  A  personal  story  about  you  and   exposing  your  human  self…not  the  master  or  mistress  of  the  universe,  super   salesperson.     Mie  Bosworth,  the  famous  sales  trainer  and  author  of  SoluHon  Selling  and  Customer   Centric  Selling,  has  quit  both  of  those  businesses  because  he  believes  so  strongly  that   without  storytelling  and  story-­‐tending,  there  is  no  trust  and  without  trust,  there  is  no   engagement  and  this  is  a  major  problem  In  selling  today.     40  
    • AMer  establishing  rapport  and  engagement  we  want  to  establish  the  status  quo  in  the   customers  world.     In  our  case,  your  presentaHons  suck.   Its  important  for  the  buyer  to  acknowledge  this  is  the  case  and  to  get  them  engaged   in  conversaHon  around  whats  holding  them  back   41  
    • Next  we  want  to  introduce  the  World  as  it  Could  Be,  -­‐  not  specifically  your  products   or  soluHons,  but  challenge  the  buyer  with  concepts  and  ideas  they  may  not  have   thought  about,  around  which  you  can  build  your  case.   42  
    • When  we  have  outlined  the  World  as  it  could  be,  we  need  to  introduce  the   complicaHons  and  engage  the  buyer  in  conversaHon  about  their  problems,  barriers  to   progress  internal  and  external  complicaHons.     Its  important  to  get  this  stuff  from  the  buyer,  drill  down  on  it,  write  it  down  and   qualify  it….prioriHze  it.   43  
    • During  the  middle  of  the  conversaHon  we  need  to  contrast  the  AS  IS  juxtaposed  to     AS  IT  COULD  BE  as  we  present  our  case.     An  important  point  I  am  making  here  is  this.   No  metaphorical  or  borrowed  interest  photography.     Buyers  aren’t  interested  in  esoterics  or  figuring  out  the  hidden  meaning  in  a  plie  of   rocks,  if  you  want  to  communicate  clearly,  use  simple  images  that  are  easily   recognized  and  the  had  drawn  stuff  is  easy  to  draw  and  instantly  recognized,  it   doesn’t  have  to  be  perfect.   44  
    • Finally  bring  your  story  to  a  close  with  a  resoluHon.     How  you  solved  the  problem  and  in  the  process,  you  have  introduced  your  products   and  services  (in  green)  and  captured  their  issues  in  red  and  the  next  steps  in  blue.     By  the  way  I  used  this  exact  whiteboard  on  a  3’*  2’  whiteboard  at  the  recent  HubSpot   Inbound  tradeshow  in  Boston  and  pitched  people  in  the  aisle  as  they  came  past.     Total  cost  for  the  exhibit,  $60.00.  Impact,  priceless  as  I  was  able  to  convey  in  1-­‐2   minutes  a  complex  set  of  services  and  engage  the  buyer  around  their  issues.     Can  you  see  how  the  combinaHon  of  story  and  visual  storytelling  can  help  you   connect  more  effecHvely  with  buyers?     Can  you  see  how  you  can  move  from  a  boring  product  centric  PowerPoint   presentaHon  all  about  you  and  your  company  to  a  buyer-­‐  centric  conversaHon  where   the  buyer  is  the  hero  of  the  story?     45  
    • Finally  our  visual  storytelling  concludes  with  a  call  to  acHon.     We  can  help  you  translate  your  PowerPoint  into  a  simple,  yet  powerful  and   compelling  visual  story  and  help  everyone  on  your  team  tell  it.       46  
    • This  concludes  our  presentaHon.     Reference  material  used  in  the  presentaHon  comes  from:   Brain  Rules  by  John  Mediana,   Resonate  and  one  day  seminar  by  Nancy  Duarte   The  Edward  TuMe  one  day  seminar  and  book  series     Thank  you  for  your  arenHon.     47