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University of the Highlands and Islands, Business and Leisure, Video-conferencing Best Practice 2013
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University of the Highlands and Islands, Business and Leisure, Video-conferencing Best Practice 2013

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PowerPoint slides from staff development event

PowerPoint slides from staff development event

Published in: Education, Business

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  • 1. Video Conference Best PracticeSimon Clarke,Shetland College, UHIApril 2013
  • 2. Objectives• Identify the challenges in teaching by VC• Explore possible solutions• Consider the whole package for VC ledmodules not just what happens in the VCsuite.
  • 3. Technical Problems• An extra layer of complexity to go wrong!• How can we protect ourselves?
  • 4. Engaging Presentation• What could be done better here?
  • 5. Inclusion• How will the remote students feel?• How could inclusion be better managed?
  • 6. Audience Behaviour• What do you require of a conventionalclass?• What should you require of a VC class?
  • 7. Lack of feedback for the tutor• Remote sites will be “muted”• Only the last site to have spoken will be onscreen.
  • 8. VLE support is VitalContent displaced from the VC to the VLE.
  • 9. VLE advantages• Accurate and Reliable• Lecturer freed from dictating• Students freed from note taking• Not a disaster if VC session is missed orthere is an equipment failure.VC session can concentrate on beingstimulating and interactive.
  • 10. Twin Screen Arrangement• Incoming signal, from remote sites• Outgoing signal from a range of input devices
  • 11. Visual Inputs; Object Camera• Touch Screen PC• Object Camera• Potentially as visually rich as conventionalteaching
  • 12. The Audience Experience• Students should see both speaker andpresentation• Remove the presentation when not in use.
  • 13. Combining local and VC delivery• Lecturer needs to face both the cameraand local group.
  • 14. Focus on the current speaker• Presets to quickly switch between views
  • 15. Lecture Theatres• Audience camera and lecturer camera• Need to select the appropriate one• Need to adjust both• Need to ask the audience to sit together
  • 16. They’re behind you!• How could this lab session have beenbetter managed?
  • 17. Active Listening• Break up presentations into short sections• Actively seek input from all centres• Encourage students to interrupt withquestions and comments.The possibility of interaction affects theway people listen, even if they don’tpersonally speak during a session.
  • 18. Longitudinal Dialogue• Expect students to come to sessionsprepped by having read ahead• Assessment and feedback needs to forman effective cycle of dialogue andimprovement• VC is only a small part of the “contact” thatstudents require
  • 19. Recordings• VC session recorded centrally• Available via a hypertext link from VLE• Shows speaker and slides, questions fromthe class
  • 20. What is Streaming For?• Offers security of delivery andflexibility to students• Only a recording – not interactive• Only stored for two weeks – not along term resource• Availability may affect whetherstudents turn up for the live session.
  • 21. ConferenceMe, PC based VC• Ordinary PC, with an inexpensive webcam• Much less expensive• Potential for home access.• Causes quality and management problems
  • 22. Conclusions: Programme Design• Redesign courses and modules to workthrough the medium of VC.• All VC modules should be supportedwith online materials – for security ofdelivery and to displace content form theVC session.• Induct students in VC and VLE –manage expectation and behaviour.
  • 23. Before the VC Session• Rooms need to be booked and thebridge informed prior to the class toensure a smooth start• Manage VC rooms to ensure equipmentis arranged appropriately• Be familiar with the VC equipment priorto the class
  • 24. During the VC• Manage your local cameras for aprofessional presentation• Don’t just be a talking head. VC can be asvisually rich as face to face.• Be student centred – VC should beinteractive• VC use is a significant learning outcome inits own right – require appropriatebehaviour from your class
  • 25. After the VC• Make recordings routinely available tostudents – most recordings are notcurrently used.• Be available to your students by phoneand email - the equivalent of speakingafter the class. Teaching should be anextended dialogue with students.