Literary devices, 1 31-11

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Introduction to the literary devices presented in pages 3-22 of the novel Night, by Elie Wiesel.

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Literary devices, 1 31-11

  1. 1. Literary Devices Point of View Symbolism Simile Metaphor Night, pages 3-22
  2. 2. Objectives <ul><li>Content Objective : Students will be able to </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify the literary devices used in Chapter 1, pp. 3-22 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Language Objective : Students will be able to </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Read text to find similes and metaphors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Read sentences and tell the difference between similes and metaphors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Write similes and metaphors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Listen to text and identify device heard </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Point of View <ul><li>Point of view in literature refers to the person telling the story. There are three possible points of view in a novel </li></ul><ul><ul><li>First-person narrator is a character telling the story as he or she experienced it. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Third-person limited narrator knows what one character is doing and thinking. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Third-person omniscient narrator knows what all the characters are doing and thinking </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Which point of view has Wiesel chosen for Night ? <ul><li>First-person narrator? </li></ul><ul><li>Third-person limited narrator? </li></ul><ul><li>Third-person omniscient narrator? </li></ul><ul><li>What about another story you recently read? </li></ul>
  5. 5. Symbolism <ul><li>A symbol is an object, an event, or a character that represents an idea or a set of ideas. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Symbolism <ul><li>A symbol is an object, an event, or a character that represents an idea or a set of ideas . </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What did the altar symbolize? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(p.22) The synagogue resembled a large railroad station…The altar was shattered, the wall coverings shredded, the walls themselves bare.” </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Similes <ul><li>I feel like a million bucks. </li></ul><ul><li>She’s as thick as a log. </li></ul><ul><li>My husband is as sweet as honey. </li></ul><ul><li>My love is like a red, red rose. </li></ul>A simile is a figure of speech which compares two different objects using the words “ like ” or “ as ”
  8. 8. Simile <ul><li>A simile is a figure of speech which compares two different objects using the words “ like ” or “ as ” </li></ul><ul><li>p.16 …weariness had settled into our veins like molten lead. </li></ul><ul><li>What is being compared? </li></ul>
  9. 9. Why use similes? <ul><li>How is the simile “ By eight o’clock, weariness had settled into our veins like molten lead” more effective than saying “By eight o’clock we were very tired” ? </li></ul>
  10. 10. Metaphors <ul><li>It’s raining cats and dogs. </li></ul><ul><li>The hammer pounded nails into my head. </li></ul><ul><li>A soft, white blanket covered the land. </li></ul>A metaphor is a figure of speech that uses words to mean something else to make a comparison.
  11. 11. Metaphor <ul><li>A metaphor is a figure of speech that compares two different objects. </li></ul><ul><li>p.21 The stars were…sparks of the immense conflagration that was consuming us. </li></ul><ul><li>What does the conflagration represent? </li></ul>
  12. 12. Find the Simile or Metaphor <ul><li>p. 3 Simile </li></ul><ul><li>P. 5 Metaphor </li></ul><ul><li>P. 7 Simile </li></ul><ul><li>P. 11 Simile </li></ul><ul><li>P. 14 Metaphor </li></ul><ul><li>P. 17 Simile </li></ul><ul><li>P. 17 Metaphor </li></ul><ul><li>P. 19 Metaphor </li></ul>

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