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Really Social
Really Social
Really Social
Really Social
Really Social
Really Social
Really Social
Really Social
Really Social
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Really Social

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  • Who are you?What social media are you currently using?What info are you hoping to gain from this workshop?
  • Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, TimelyWhat are we doing, how will we measure it, how can we make sure it is realistic, how can we make sure it gets done in time?Pass out the Four Processes for High Impact eAdvocacy - Goals
  • Your brand’s social personality sets you apart from other brands. Find your voice and use it. What kind of brand does your organization have? Depending on the nature of your audience, your words and the way in which you respond are integral.Consider what your brand or organization is really about. How can you convert your mission statement or the “About Us” page on your website into actual conversation you’ll facilitate and be involved in each day?KISS: The most effective messages get straight to the point, use simple language, conversational, Twitter – use acronyms POTUS for President of the United States. Shorten URLs with bit.lyBe an authentic human being in your interactions online. An online voice that is conversational and authentic will get people excited to hear what you have to say. It is easier to interact with “Paul” than with a nameless and faceless organization. Tag friends, businesses, groups… Give them a “shout out” by highlighting them on your posts. Twitter - @mentions #hashtag“#” symbol, are used to mark clickable / keywords or topics in a message@On Twitter, the process of tagging other users is through mentionscan tag other Facebook Pages in your messages by typing “@”Be Responsive – use your voice to respond to your audience and engage with them.
  • Start with who you know. Get people from inside your organization to follow your page.Don’t just tell your audience to like you, tell them what’s in it for them, and tell them in a way that’s about them, not you. Consider the following two different calls to action: “Like us on Facebook now at” …. “Find out more about how to get involved at CSUS at”….. Create a 15-second elevator pitch to tell your customers or anyone you come into contact with why they should like you on Facebook and follow you on Twitter. Make sure it’s a reason that would resonate with you as a consumer. Make it about them and not about you.Follow other organizations and help promote their content, if it applies to your audience. Over time, individuals and organizations will naturally like your Facebook page and follow you on Twitter. Return the favor!
  • Update your information often. Outdated information can hurt your organization more than help. People often use Social Media to find out how to contact your organization, what events are happening, and who works there.A Publishing Matrix is a grid that lays out an organization’s online channels as well as the content it publishes on each channel.Use a content management tool. If you are already using Facebook and Twitter but find it too time consuming, look at using a program like Hootsuite. Allows you to manage the accounts at the same time.Is FREE for the basic version.Create dashboards with streams that you find relevant.Schedule posts to go out at a later time or date.
  • Try and post daily – set realistic goals for your posting schedule.Post at different times and dates – in order to reach different audiences. Schedule posts through hootsuite twitter or on facebook. Diversify the type of content you post: infographics, quotes, videos, photos. Create videos. Keep it short and sweet. People’s attention spans online are short – no longer than two minutes. Facebook’s algorithm determines the level of interest or relevancy of an object based on the number of comments or likes it receives. The greater response to the object, the more likely it is to show up in users’ news feeds. Shares get more engagement than likes or comments. Ask people to comment to win a prize or ask other questions to engage people.Contests and sweepstakes create excitement, but nothing generates more excitement than opportunities for everyone in an audience to win something. If we hit 1000 fans, we will throw a pizza party for all of our fans. RafflecopterShared opportunity can drive an entire fan page to work together in promoting the growth of its community.
  • Kloutis a website and mobile app that uses social media analytics to rank its users according to online social influence via the "Klout Score", which is a numerical value between 1 and 100. In determining the user score, Klout measures the size of a user's social media network and correlates the content created to measure how other users interact with that contentCheck your analytics, but remember that it is more important to engage your followers, than to get more “likes”See what time your followers are online and make sure that you are posting at the best times.
  • Transcript

    • 1. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Why Social Media? Starting Out: Be Intentional Accomplish Your Vision How to Communicate How to Build a Following Tips for Managing Social Media Generate Engaging Content Measure your Effectiveness
    • 2. STARTING OUT: BE INTENTIONAL • Develop a well thought-out vision of how you want to use Social Media. • Ask yourself:  Who is your target audience?  What do you specifically want to accomplish by using social media? What are your goals?  How does social media connect with your organization’s vision and mission?  How much time and resources are you willing to invest?
    • 3. ACCOMPLISH YOUR VISION • Which Social Media tools are most appropriate for achieving your goals?  Social Networks: Facebook, Twitter  Blogs: Wordpress, Tumblr  Photo Sharing: Instagram, Flickr  Professional Networks: LinkedIn  Video Sharing: YouTube, Vimeo • Start out by using one or two really well… then increase. • It can help to develop SMART goals for your social media.
    • 4. HOW TO COMMUNICATE ON SOCIAL MEDIA • Find your voice and use it. • Consider what your brand or organization is really about. • KISS: Keep It Short & Simple • Be an authentic human being in your interactions online. • Tag friends, businesses, groups… Give them a “shout out” by highlighting them on your posts. • Twitter - @mentions #hashtag • Be Responsive
    • 5. HOW TO BUILD A FOLLOWING • Start with who you know • Don’t just tell your audience to like you, tell them what’s in it for them, and tell them in a way that’s about them, not you • Create a 15-second elevator pitch • Follow other organizations and help promote their content
    • 6. TIPS FOR MANAGING SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNTS • Update your information often. • Use a publishing matrix • Use a content management tool – like Hootsuite: • Allows you to manage the accounts at the same time • Is FREE for the basic version • Create dashboards with streams that you find relevant • Schedule posts to go out at a later time or date
    • 7. HOW TO GENERATE ENGAGING CONTENT • Try and post daily • Post at different times and dates • Diversify the type of content you post • The Facebook’s algorithm can hurt or help • Contests and sweepstakes create excitement
    • 8. MEASURE YOUR EFFECTIVENESS FOR FREE • Facebook Insights for pages • Twitter analytics • Klout score • Twazzup • FollowerWonk
    • 9. Parts of this presentation were taken from: Kerpen, D. (2011). Likeable social media. New York: McGraw Hill. De Vera, J. (2013). The art of listening: Social media toolkit. San Francisco, CA: The Greenling Institute. Retrieved from http://greenlining.org/wpcontent/uploads/2013/09/The-Art-of-Listening-Social-Media-Toolkit-forNonprofits.pdf Stelzner, M. (2013). Social media examiner. Retrieved from http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com

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