National Gambling Report 2008

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National Gambling Report 2008

  1. 1. 2008 National Gambling Report Consumer Attitudes and Behaviour June 2008
  2. 2. Proprietary Warning The information contained herein is proprietary to Harris/Decima and may not be used, reproduced or disclosed to others except as specifically permitted in writing by the originator of the information. The recipient of this information, by its retention and use, agrees to protect the same and the information contained therein from loss, theft or compromise. Any material or information provided by Harris/Decima and all data collected by Harris/Decima will be treated as confidential by Harris/Decima and will be stored securely while on Harris/Decima’s premise (adhering to industry standards and applicable laws). Toronto Ottawa Montreal Vancouver 2345 Yonge Street 160 Elgin Street 1080 Beaver Hall Hill 21 Water Street Suite 405 Suite 1820 Suite 400 Suite 603 Toronto, Ontario Ottawa, Ontario Montreal, Quebec Vancouver, British Columbia M4P 2E5 K2P 2P7 H2Z 1S8 V6B 1A1 t: (416) 962-2013 t: (613) 230-2200 t: (514) 288-0037 t: (604) 642-2295 f: (416) 962-0505 f: (613) 230-9048 f: (514) 288-0138 f: (604) 642-2549
  3. 3. Table of Contents 2008 National Gambling Report 72 Appendix 1: Demographics…………………………………………………………. 60 Canadian Problem Gambling Index……………………………………………… 48 Gambling Attitude Segmentation………………………………………………….. 43 Attitudes Towards Gambling……………………………………………………….. 34 Government Approval Ratings…………………………………………………….. 30 Acceptability of New Gambling Concepts……………………………………….. 25 Social Issues…………………………………………………………………………. 13 Gambling Behaviour………………………………………………………………… 9 Introduction…………………………………………………………………………… 4 Executive Summary……………………………………………………………. PAGE
  4. 4. Executive Summary
  5. 5. Summary of Findings (Page 1 of 4) <ul><li>There can be no doubt that Canadians enjoy gambling, though to varying degrees and with diverse interests. In the past year, 81% of approximately 25 million Canadians over the age of 18 played a lottery game and just under half (47%) participated in other gambling activities such as casinos, sports betting, bingo, and others. </li></ul><ul><li>And interest continues to grow, with a 5% increase in lottery participation since 2006. Though there has been a 4% reported decrease in other gambling activities over the previous year, it is still on par with 2006, and the percentage difference may well be negated by the larger population from which to draw participants. Further, given the comparable increase and decline, it’s possible some gaming enthusiasts turned to lotteries instead. </li></ul><ul><li>Of particular significance, the percentage of Canadians who claim to have never gambled continues to decline, from 20% in 2006 to 13% in the last year. The choice of lapsed gambler was selected by 9%, unchanged over the past three studies. </li></ul><ul><li>For the most part, Canadians see themselves as social gamblers who play when the opportunity arises, at social occasions, or when the lottery jackpots are big. On the opposite end, 11% of respondents self-classified as regular or professional gamblers. </li></ul><ul><li>This study delves deeply into the gambling habits of Canadians, and puts our participation in these activities into social and political context. It deals with every form of legal gambling in Canada, and identifies the people who play which games, how they feel about new gaming concepts, their perceptions of the provincial governments which regulate gambling, and of great importance, the perceived or real prevalence of problem gambling. </li></ul><ul><li>What follows are some of the major highlights of each section within the Harris/Decima 2008 National Gambling Report. </li></ul>2008 National Gambling Report
  6. 6. Summary of Findings (Page 2 of 4) <ul><li>Gambling Behaviour </li></ul><ul><li>Participation in lottery games are consistent from coast to coast, while British Columbia, the Prairies and Ontario are leading the way in terms of participating in other gambling activities. </li></ul><ul><li>The most popular lottery tickets purchased continue to be the large jackpot lotteries such as “Lotto 649 or Super 7”, while gambling at casinos continues to be the most popular form of gambling activity. </li></ul><ul><li>The rate at which Canadians gamble has remained the same as previous years, with over one-third reporting they gamble less today than they did three years ago. One-tenth report that they gamble more than they did three years ago. </li></ul><ul><li>The majority of Canadians gamble responsibly, with two-thirds indicating they decide on a budget before they start to gamble. </li></ul><ul><li>There has been significant increases in the purchase of charity or cause tickets, with a quarter of Canadians purchasing them in the last year, an increase of 7% over 2006. Further, 15% (up 4% in the past two years) purchased “Hospital” tickets. </li></ul><ul><li>Societal Issues </li></ul><ul><li>Nearly 2-in-5 Canadians indicate they know someone personally who they think has a problem with some form of gambling, an increase of 6% over the past year. </li></ul><ul><li>While these sentiments are much greater than what is reported as actual “problem gamblers”, it is reflective of a greater sense that problem gambling is an increasing social concern. </li></ul><ul><li>When asked to rate gambling addiction against other societal issues, 48% of Canadians say it is a serious or very serious issue, up 5% over the previous two years. </li></ul><ul><li>However, Canadians rank gambling addiction the second lowest concern among the seven issues tested, far below drug addiction, and further down the list than driving too fast. </li></ul><ul><li>Though half of Canadians indicate gambling addiction is a serious concern, 67% still see gambling as a more preferable means (over increased taxes) for provincial governments to raise additional revenues, if required. This represents a 10% increase over the previous year, </li></ul>2008 National Gambling Report
  7. 7. Summary of Findings (Page 3 of 4) <ul><li>Acceptability of New Game Concepts </li></ul><ul><li>An indicator of the public’s acceptability of gambling, and where product demand may focus, can be found in their reaction to new forms of gambling already available or considered in other parts of the world. </li></ul><ul><li>Although it is illegal for Canadians to wager on the outcome of a single sporting event, 40% feel the laws should be changed to allow this kind of activity. </li></ul><ul><li>Between 30% and 36% feel that online wagering, poker, lottery and casino sites would be highly or somewhat acceptable. </li></ul><ul><li>There have been considerable increases in support from every region for online poker. These sites, as well as wagering sites, top the list of “highly supportive” products at 10%. </li></ul><ul><li>Government Approval Ratings </li></ul><ul><li>Just half (52%) of Canadians say they are satisfied with the overall performance of their provincial government </li></ul><ul><li>. </li></ul><ul><li>Two in three Canadians recognize the balance government is trying to achieve between encouraging gambling and easing gambling addiction. </li></ul><ul><li>Only a quarter feel government is doing a good job at regulating gambling activities, though there has been an 8% increase in this belief over the past three years. </li></ul><ul><li>By studying those who feel that gambling is a serious problem and that government is doing a poor job in regulating gambling, we are able to gauge the “barometer” of public pressure facing governments over gambling issues. Nationally, the “public pressure barometer” remains at 23%, as it was in 2007. </li></ul><ul><li>The vast majority of Canadians (88%) are in agreement that governments should maintain ownership of casinos, though only 38% feel government should actually be running them. </li></ul>2008 National Gambling Report
  8. 8. Summary of Findings (Page 4 of 4) <ul><li>Gambling Attitude Segmentation </li></ul><ul><li>The survey included 27 questions asking respondents to rate a list of attributes related to gambling issues. Because these attributes may essentially be measuring only a few different underlying dimensions or ‘factors’, we used a factor analysis to reduce the number of variables we needed to consider. Results include: </li></ul><ul><li>Less than a quarter of Canadians think that the problems of gambling far outweigh the benefits. </li></ul><ul><li>One quarter see the benefits that gambling provides but are concerned about the problems that may arise from too much. </li></ul><ul><li>Alberta, British Columbia and Ontario are the leading provinces in terms of support for gambling. </li></ul><ul><li>Atlantic Canada led that group in 2007 at 63%, but with a 22% drop, they now join Quebec, which also dropped, as the least supportive, well below the national average. </li></ul><ul><li>Canadian Problem Gambling Index </li></ul><ul><li>The Canadian Problem Gambling Index (CPGI) is based on a battery of nine questions that are asked to all respondents. Results from this year’s study include: </li></ul><ul><li>About 3-in-4 Canadians are considered non or non-problem gamblers according to the CPGI. </li></ul><ul><li>Twenty one percent are considered “problem” gamblers, including 14% who are considered to be “at-risk” and 6% who are “moderate problem gamblers”. </li></ul><ul><li>The CPGI showed that a small proportion of Canadians (4%) are “severe problem” gamblers. Since the past study, the percentage of severe problem gamblers has doubled. </li></ul><ul><li>At the provincial level, respondents from Alberta are more likely to be “at-risk” gamblers at 27%. </li></ul>2008 National Gambling Report
  9. 9. Introduction
  10. 10. Background (Page 1 of 2) <ul><li>The gaming industry in Canada makes a major contribution to our economy and has seen steady growth over the last decade with revenue increases of 127% from $6 billion in 1995 to $15.3 billion in 2005. It is projected that the industry will contribute over $16 billion to our economy by 2009. In comparison to other entertainment industries, gambling surpasses the combined revenues from magazines, books, newspapers, drinking establishments, spectator sports, movie theatres, and the performing arts. The sector accounts for the employment, direct and indirect, of over 100,000 Canadians. </li></ul><ul><li>Gambling is also very profitable, with 57% of revenue realized as profit, far greater than any other sector of the hospitality industry. Most of this revenue ($8.7 billion) is redirected into supporting government programs and services, as well as to charities, while $6.6 billion (43%) sustains the operations. Within the gambling sector, there are significant variations in the profitability of each component, with VLT profits at 72% of revenue, lotteries at 61%, casinos at 52%, and bingo at 42%, all enviable profits for any sector 1 . </li></ul><ul><li>The growth within the industry reflects the reality that Canadians very much enjoy gambling. In the past year, 81% of approximately 25 million Canadians over the age of 18 played a lottery game, with interest continuing to grow, as demonstrated by the 5% increase in lottery participation since 2006. Just under half of Canadians (47%) participated in other gambling activities such as casinos, sports betting, bingo, and others. </li></ul><ul><li>The supply of, and demand for, gambling activities in Canada marry nicely to allow governments to feel comfortable in the end result, which is to count on revenues from gambling to deliver additional programs and funding, rather than to increase taxes for such purposes. In fact, the majority of Canadians support this direction, with 67% choosing gambling as the more preferable means for provincial governments to raise additional revenues, if required. This represents a 10% increase over the past year. </li></ul><ul><li>As with any industry, it is essential the negative impacts of gambling are quantified, qualified, accepted and properly addressed. Though the perception by Canadians is that the problem of gambling addictions is much larger than it truly is (37% of Canadians indicate that they personally know someone who has a problem with some form of gambling), only two to four percent of Canadians are severe problem gamblers. Regardless of the low percentage, it is an issue that is being, and must continue to be, addressed. </li></ul>Notes: 1 Canadian Gaming Economic Impact Study, HLT Advisory Report
  11. 11. Background (Page 2 of 2) <ul><li>With ongoing and increased need to generate more revenue from gambling activities, government agencies, the industry and charitable organizations require a solid understanding of how Canadians view gambling activities. Certainly, two thirds of Canadians recognize the balance government is trying to achieve between encouraging gambling and easing gambling addiction, and support the economic benefits that gambling provides, though with varying degrees of concern for the problems that may arise. Others feel the social costs and problems associated with gambling outweigh the economic benefits it provides their provinces. Others still, feel that it is ultimately up to individuals to control their gambling behaviours regardless of the benefit or cost to society. </li></ul><ul><li>How much gambling is allowed, what form of gambling is permitted and how the government chooses to regulate it, is shaped by Canadians’ opinions on these issues. Public opinion can vary markedly by region and by demographic group. Therefore, stakeholders who depend on the public to support their gambling enterprises need to be up to date on shifts and trends in public opinion on the state of gambling. </li></ul><ul><li>The National Gambling Report is a unique syndicated yearly consumer research study that explores gambling behaviour and attitudes towards the issues that surround policy decisions related to these activities, and tracts trends and changes over previous years. This comprehensive report delves deeply into the gambling habits of Canadians, and puts our participation in these activities into social and political context. It deals with every form of legal gambling in Canada, and identifies the people who play which games, how they feel about new gaming concepts, their perceptions of the provincial governments which regulate gambling, and of great importance, the perceived or real prevalence of problem gambling. </li></ul><ul><li>The results from this study will help gaming industry decision makers anticipate market changes and will enable better preparation in meeting consumer needs and expectations. Furthermore, the results will facilitate quick identification of future opportunities for, and barriers to, growth. </li></ul>2008 National Gambling Report
  12. 12. Methodology & Objectives <ul><li>A total of 3,047 Canadians were surveyed online during March-April 2008. Respondents are members of Harris/Decima proprietary online research panel, which consists of over 400,000 members across Canada. </li></ul><ul><li>The data is weighted to reflect age and gender distribution within each province of Canada . The final distribution of unweighted data is shown in the table below. </li></ul><ul><li>The results of this study can be considered accurate within the margin of error of +/- 1.8% at the 95% confidence level (19 times out of 20). The margin of error associated with the provincial results are correspondingly higher (as shown in the table below). </li></ul><ul><li>NOTE: Check 3 rd para for wording with Richard; do we drop 3 rd column? </li></ul><ul><li>The objectives of the study are as follows: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To assess perceived seriousness of gambling addiction; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To gauge satisfaction with provincial governments in regulating gambling; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To measure past lottery and gambling behaviour; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To explore attitudes towards gambling; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To develop segments for positioning communications; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To measure levels of acceptability for gambling activities delivered through “new technology”; and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To determine levels of problem gambling using the Canadian Problem Gambling Index (CPGI), nine question inventory. </li></ul></ul>2008 National Gambling Report +/- 5.6% 10% 303 Alberta (AB) +/- 5.6% 10% 306 Manitoba / Saskatchewan (MB/SK) +/- 3.1% 33% 995 Ontario (ON) +/- 3.6% 25% 756 Quebec (QC) +/- 5.6% 10% 308 Atlantic Canada (ATL) 12% 100% Proportion +/- 5.0% +/- 1.8% Margin of Error Sample Size 379 British Columbia (BC) 3,047 Canada
  13. 13. Gambling Behaviour
  14. 14. Gambling Behaviour <ul><li>To acquire a sense of the how respondents see themselves, as gamblers or non, they were asked to place themselves into one of six gambling activity categories. </li></ul><ul><li>Most significant, the percentage of Canadians who claim to have never gambled continues to decline. There are several possible reasons for this, including our aging population and the arrival of new Canadians for whom gambling may be more acceptable. Those who say they have never gambled will no doubt continue to drop. </li></ul><ul><li>Of note: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Social gamblers remain the most common group at 29%. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A quarter (23%) of respondents classify themselves as opportunists, a slight increase of 4% over the previous two snapshots. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>15% are enticed by big jackpots, on par with 2006 and 2007. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interestingly, 11% of respondents self-classified as regular or professional gamblers *. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The percentage of lapsed gamblers remains unchanged. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Regional differences include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Quebecers and Atlantic Canadians (14%) are more likely to classify themselves as regular or professional gamblers, when compared to those in Alberta (9%). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Those from Ontario and the Prairies (34%) are the most likely to gamble on social occasions, while those in Quebec (21%) are the least likely to classify themselves this way. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Alberta has the highest percentage (13%) of lapsed gamblers, while British Columbia has the least (6%). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Respondents from British Columbia (19%) are more likely to be jackpot driven, when compared to Ontario (13%) and Prairies (12%). </li></ul></ul>B1. Which of the following best describes your gambling activity? Note: *Percentage of respondents who gamble on a regular basis or gamble to earn an income.
  15. 15. Overall Participation Rates <ul><li>Canadians enjoy gambling, though to varying degrees and with diverse interests, with over 80% playing a lottery game and just under half (47%) participating in other gambling activities (i.e. casinos, sports betting, bingo, etc.) in the past year. </li></ul><ul><li>With the ease in accessibility to lotteries, this form of gambling remains the preferred avenue among the vast majority of those wagering money for the opportunity to win, and that gap is growing. </li></ul><ul><li>Over the past two years lottery participation increased by 5% while other gambling activities dropped by four, though still above the 2006 level. Given the similar increase and decline, it’s possible some gaming enthusiasts turned to lotteries instead. </li></ul><ul><li>For the first time, in 2008 we asked if they had gambled in the past two months (1 st quarter of 2008); lottery players remained consistent through the winter months while other gambling activities saw participation well below what they indicated they did during the year, possibly indicating a decline, but more likely reflecting seasonal drops. </li></ul>B2. Which of the following Lottery games have you spent money on in the past 12 months? B3. Which of the following Lottery games have you spent money on in the past 2 months? B5. Which of the following gambling activities have you spent money on in the past 12 months? B6. Which of the following gambling activities have you spent money on in the past 2 months? Not Asked Not Asked
  16. 16. Lottery Games Played (chart on next page) <ul><li>As noted, the vast majority of Canadians enjoy playing lottery games, with 4-in-5 (81%) having played in the past 12 months, and almost all of these (79%) having played in the past 2 months. Only a fifth (19%) did not play any lottery games in the past 12 months, representing a significant drop of 7% since 2006. </li></ul><ul><li>In keeping with their penchant for large jackpot lotteries, nearly three quarters (73%) of all Canadian adults report they have played “Lotto 649 or Super 7” in the past 12 months, with two-thirds (66%) having played in the past 2 months. </li></ul><ul><li>Gaining ground on the big two are “Scratch and Win or Instant Win” lottery tickets which saw an increase of 14% over the previous study, with 54% having played in the past 12 months. These reported increases mirror actual sales of such tickets across the country. It appears the strategy of raising the instant ticket payouts has paid off with greater participation. </li></ul><ul><li>A quarter of Canadians supported a charity or cause over the last year via the purchase of tickets from registered charities, an increase of 7% over 2006. Fifteen percent (up 4 points in the past two years) purchased “Hospital” tickets. The increases in both of these categories indicate a greater availability of such products and/or better product development and marketing by the proponents. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Sports” lottery tickets remain attractive to just 5% of the population and will probably continue to hold this niche position until gambling is opened up to single game wagers.. </li></ul>2008 National Gambling Report
  17. 17. Lottery Games Played (continued) B2. Which of the following Lottery games have you spent money on in the past 12 months? B3. Which of the following Lottery games have you spent money on in the past 2 months? Note: *Other lottery games category for 2006-07 includes aided mentions of Daily and regional lotteries, Break-open/Pull-tab/Nevada tickets, Payday, Cyber Lotteries, Interactive lottery games, Joker, Pacific Hold ‘em Poker. These lottery games are not included as separate categories in the 2008 questionnaire.
  18. 18. Lottery Games Played: Provincial Profile <ul><li>Regional or provincial differences do not come into play as far as the level of lottery purchases go, with consistent participation across Canada in the low 80’s, and with all having a fairly equal desire to win one of the big dream games. </li></ul><ul><li>Past 12 months: </li></ul><ul><li>There remain differences as to how residents of each province wish to spend their discretionary income: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Scratch and Win or Instant Win” lottery tickets are more popular in British Columbia (60%) and Ontario (55%) than in Quebec (49%). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The purchase of “Charity or Cause” lottery tickets is highest in Alberta (37%) compared to the rest of Canada. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The purchase of “Hospital” lottery tickets is highest in Alberta (25%) and lowest in Quebec (5%). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Sports” lottery games are not as popular across Canada. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Past 2 months: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The purchase of “Scratch and Win or Instant Win” lottery tickets is more popular in Ontario (45%), compared to Atlantic Canada (36%), Quebec (37%) and Alberta (37%). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The purchase of “Charity or Cause” lottery tickets is highest in Alberta and Atlantic Canada (20% each). </li></ul></ul>B2. Which of the following Lottery games have you spent money on in the past 12 months? B3. Which of the following Lottery games have you spent money on in the past 2 months? PAST 2 MONTH PURCHASE OF LOTTERY GAMES 17% 20% 18% 19% 20% 18% 19% Not in past 12 months 82% 79% 81% 79% 78% 80% 79% LOTTO GAMES - NET 67% 64% 68% 67% 66% 65% 66% Lotto 649 or Super 7 44% 37% 42% 45% 37% 36% 41% Scratch and Win or Instant Win lottery tickets 8% 20% 11% 11% 10% 20% 12% Charity or cause lottery tickets 7% 15% 13% 7% 1% 7% 7% Hospital lottery tickets 3% 3% 3% 3% 2% 3% 3% Sports lottery games 8% 2% 5% 4% 6% 8% 5% Other lottery games 83% 80% 82% 81% 80% 82% 81% LOTTO GAMES - NET 21% 21% 19% 21% 22% 20% 21% Not in past 2 months 13% 7% 10% 7% 10% 13% 9% Other lottery games 6% 4% 6% 5% 3% 4% 5% Sports lottery games 17% 25% 19% 16% 5% 16% 15% Hospital lottery tickets 25% 37% 24% 24% 23% 31% 25% Charity or cause lottery tickets 60% 53% 54% 55% 49% 52% 54% Scratch and Win or Instant Win lottery tickets 77% 71% 73% 73% 73% 73% 73% Lotto 649 or Super 7 BC AB MB/SK ON QC ATL Canada PAST 12 MONTH PURCHASE OF LOTTERY GAMES
  19. 19. Gambling Activities Participation (chart on following page) <ul><li>Accessibility to lotteries certainly make them more a part of the lives of Canadians than other forms of gambling, particularly casinos. It can be argued the majority of Canadians (53%) did not gamble at other activities in the past year as they are more at ease with the solitary purchase of tickets as opposed to the more public activities. </li></ul><ul><li>On the other hand, nearly half of Canadians (47%) participated in gambling activities in the past 12 months, a third (34%) having played in the past two. </li></ul><ul><li>Casino visits continue to be the most popular form of gambling activity, with nearly a third (30%) of all Canadians reporting they spent time at a casino in the past year. When compared to the previous year, slightly less Canadians have gambled at casinos, down four percentage points, but still above the 2006 level. During the two months prior to this survey, 18% gambled in a casino. </li></ul><ul><li>Over the past three years, on average, nearly 13% of Canadians reported enjoying the opportunity to wager with family and friends in private games such as cards or dominoes. Participation in most other gambling activities changed little in the past three years, with bingo at 9%, betting through an electronic gaming machine outside of a casino (8%) and betting on the outcome of sports or other events (6%). </li></ul>2008 National Gambling Report
  20. 20. Gambling Activities Participation (continued) B5. Which of the following gambling activities have you spent money on in the past 12 months? B6. Which of the following gambling activities have you spent money on in the past 2 months?
  21. 21. Gambling Activities Participation: Regional Profile (past 12 months) <ul><li>The regional breakdowns of these numbers underscore the differences in how Canadians feel about, have access to, and participate in various forms of gambling. Though, for example, there are currently 66 casinos and 28 racinos in Canada, there are only three in Atlantic Canada and nine in Quebec, partially explaining why residents of these provinces have substantially lower casino participation rates (ATL: 19%; QC: 22%). However, access does not entirely translate into visitations. With 40% fewer casinos than either Ontario and Alberta, British Columbians report higher visits to casinos (39%) than the other two (33% and 30% respectively). Though with only 12 casinos between them, Prairie players are well above the national average. </li></ul><ul><li>Other key results include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Most Atlantic Canadians (60%) did participate in any gambling activities in the past year, just 2% more than Quebec, but seven points over the national average, and 12% more than British Columbia. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gambling on private games is more common in Alberta (15%) than Quebec (9%). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bingo play is more popular in Ontario (11%) compared to Alberta and British Columbia (6% each). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Betting through an electronic gaming machine outside a casino or video lottery terminal (VLT) is more likely to occur in the Prairie provinces (21%), where these games are more widespread. Play at such machines is least common in British Columbia (5%) and Ontario (2%), where they are found solely in casinos. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gambling through an Internet Casino is fairly consistent from coast to coast, with Quebecers slightly more involved to this form of gambling. </li></ul></ul>B5. Which of the following gambling activities have you spent money on in the past 12 months? 52% 47% 51% 49% 42% 40% 47% GAMBLING ACTIVITIES - NET 6% 9% 5% 5% 5% 2% 6% Bet on the outcome of sports or other events 5% 14% 21% 2% 13% 14% 8% An electronic gaming machine outside of a casino 6% 6% 8% 11% 9% 7% 9% Played Bingo for money 48% 53% 49% 51% 58% 60% 53% Not in past 12 months 9% 5% 6% 7% 5% 12% 7% Gambled on any other kind of games 3% 2% 2% 2% 4% 2% 3% Placed a wager through an Internet casino 5% 6% 3% 4% 3% 1% 4% Called a broker or gone online to trade stocks 5% 6% 2% 5% 2% 1% 4% Placed a bet on a horse race 14% 15% 13% 12% 9% 11% 12% Gambled on a private game 39% 30% 37% 33% 22% 19% 30% Gambled at a casino BC AB MB/SK ON QC ATL Canada PAST 12 MONTH PARTICIPATION IN GAMBLING ACTIVITIES
  22. 22. Gambling Activities Participation: Regional Profile (past two months) <ul><li>In the two months preceding this study: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Two thirds of Canadians did not gamble, 13% higher than the yearly average, likely reflecting the winter months. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gambling at casinos was down by 12% nationally during these two months compared to the yearly average; in fact all activities that required people to go outdoors dropped down during these months. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Compared to the other regions, a higher percentage of those in Atlantic Canada and the Prairies continued playing VLTs during these winter months. </li></ul></ul>B6. Which of the following gambling activities have you spent money on in the past 2 months? 40% 34% 40% 34% 28% 30% 34% GAMBLING ACTIVITIES - NET 5% 7% 1% 3% 3% 1% 3% Bet on the outcome of sports or other events 4% 4% 3% 7% 5% 4% 5% Played Bingo for money 4% 7% 16% 1% 8% 11% 6% An electronic gaming machine outside of a casino 60% 66% 60% 66% 72% 70% 66% Not in past 2 months 6% 3% 5% 4% 4% 10% 5% Gambled on any other kind of games 2% 2% 0% 2% 1% 0% 1% Placed a bet on a horse race 3% 2% 1% 2% 3% 1% 2% Placed a wager through an Internet casino 4% 4% 2% 3% 3% 1% 3% Called a broker or gone online to trade stocks 8% 9% 8% 7% 6% 7% 7% Gambled on a private game 29% 19% 24% 18% 11% 10% 18% Gambled at a casino BC AB MB/SK ON QC ATL Canada PAST 2 MONTH PARTICIPATION IN GAMBLING ACTIVITIES
  23. 23. Changes in Gambling Behaviour in the Past 3 Years <ul><li>Each year respondents are asked if they are gambling less, more, or the same as they did three years prior. </li></ul><ul><li>There has been very little variance in these results over the last three studies, and the rate at which Canadians gamble is exactly as in the 2007 study. Nearly two-fifths (35%) report that today they gamble less than they did three years ago. Conversely, 1-in-10 say they gamble more than they did three years ago. </li></ul><ul><li>Regionally, those living in British Columbia are more likely to report they gamble more, compared to three years ago (14%), while only 7% of Atlantic Canadians say they are doing so. </li></ul><ul><li>A greater percentage of young people, between 18 and 34, report they are gambling more or much more than they did three years ago (16%), while 38% of those over 35 say they are gambling less or much less. </li></ul>C1. Compared to 3 years ago (2005), would you say that today you gamble more, less or about the same amount as before?
  24. 24. Budgeting Before Gambling <ul><li>The majority of Canadians who gamble do so responsibly, with nearly two-thirds (64%) always deciding on a budget before they start to gamble. An additional quarter (26%) often or sometimes decide on a budget, while a tenth rarely or never set a budget prior to gambling. </li></ul><ul><li>Regionally, those living in Ontario are significantly more likely to decide on a budget before they start to gamble (68%), while Quebecers are less likely to do so (59%). </li></ul><ul><li>Females are more likely to report they always or often budget before they gamble. Those under the age of 34 years are less likely to budget than those over that age. </li></ul>B9C. When you gamble do you decide on a budget before you start to gamble? *Note: This questions was not asked in 2006 survey.
  25. 25. Social Issues
  26. 26. Problem Gambling Perceptions <ul><li>Nearly 2 in 5 Canadians (37%) say they know someone personally who they think has a problem with some form of gambling. That represents an increase of 6% over the previous year. While these sentiments are much greater than what is reported as actual “problem gamblers”, it is reflective of a greater sense that problem gambling is an increasing social concern. </li></ul><ul><li>Regionally, those who live between Ontario and the Rockies (46%) or in Atlantic Canada (43%) are more likely to think they know someone with a gambling problem compared to the national results (37%). </li></ul><ul><li>Females and older Canadians indicate they know of such problem gamblers more so than males and those who are younger. </li></ul>D2. Do you know anyone personally whom you think has a problem with some form of gambling?
  27. 27. Seriousness of Social Problems <ul><li>For the purposes of this study, it is important to not only gauge public sentiment on gambling, but to also put that into perspective with concerns over other societal issues. </li></ul><ul><li>Concern over drug use (64%) tops the list for this year, surpassing crime rates, the previously highest ranked concern (down 6% over the past three years). </li></ul><ul><li>Over half (57%) of Canadians see these issues, as well as speeding, smoking addiction and alcohol abuse as the most serious problems, while gambling addictions and unemployment are of concern to less than half the population. Concerns over gambling however show a 5% increase over the previous two reports. </li></ul><ul><li>Females and older people tend to rate all issues higher. </li></ul>A1. On a scale of 1 to 5, how serious, in your opinion, are the following problems in your province? Note: % rated social problem as serious (i.e., 4 or 5 out of 5). <ul><li>Regionally: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Drugs are by far the major concern in BC and Alberta. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Smoking addiction, alcohol abuse, gambling addiction, and unemployment rates are all issues in Atlantic Canada. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quebecers are far more concerned with speeding than any other issue. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In the Prairie provinces, crime rates and alcohol abuse are more likely to be mentioned as top concerns. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Unemployment barely registers in Alberta, as with much of the west, compared to Central and Eastern Canada. </li></ul></ul>68% 65% 76% 52% 45% 35% 54% Crime rates 44% 52% 55% 59% 62% 62% 57% Smoking addiction 55% 60% 45% 59% 71% 48% 60% Driving above the speed limit 83% 72% 63% 60% 61% 58% 64% Drug addiction 26% 11% 20% 47% 45% 60% 40% Unemployment rates 37% 54% 53% 42% 58% 54% 48% Gambling addiction 54% 60% 67% 53% 59% 60% 57% Alcohol abuse BC AB MB/SK ON QC ATL Canada PROVINCIAL PROFILE
  28. 28. Seriousness of Gambling Addiction <ul><li>As noted, though gambling addiction remains the second lowest rated concern among the seven social issues, 5% more Canadians rated it higher as a serious problem (e.g., 4 or 5 out of 5) than in the previous two years. The 2009 study will help determine if this is an anomaly or if concern is indeed increasing. Given the amount of resources made available for problem gambling programs, it may be that heightened awareness of problem gambling leads to greater concern over the problem. </li></ul><ul><li>Other than Atlantic Canada (54%) and British Columbia (37%), both on par with last year, the remainder of the provinces registered higher degrees of concern than last year. In Quebec (58%), there has been an increase of 8% over 2007, with the three Prairie Provinces jumping by 4%. Perception of gambling as a serious problem is lowest in Ontario (42%), but still an increase of 6% over last year. </li></ul><ul><li>Females, older Canadians, and those with lower incomes and less education see this issue in a more serious light. </li></ul>A1. On a scale of 1 to 5, how serious, in your opinion, are the following problems in your province? Note: % rated social problem as serious (i.e., 4 or 5 out of 5), not sure (3 out of 5), or not serious (1 or 2 out of 5).
  29. 29. More Gambling vs. More Taxes <ul><li>Although 48% of Canadians feel that gambling addiction is a serious problem in their province, 67% still see gambling as a more preferable means (over increased taxes) for provincial governments to raise additional revenues, if required. This represents a 10% increase over the previous year, possibly reflecting contentment with the direction of lowering taxes across the country. </li></ul><ul><li>The increase in preference of gambling revenue over increased taxes is reflected strongly in every province, with increases of close to 10% across the board over the previous year. Interestingly, only the Atlantic Provinces and Alberta still maintain over 40% support for the taxation option, though as noted, less are also finding that palatable in those provinces. </li></ul><ul><li>As residents of Ontario and British Columbia perceive gambling addiction to be less serious than those in other provinces, it is not surprising they overwhelmingly support raising government revenues through more gambling (71% and 68%, respectively). </li></ul>D5. If your province needed more money, which of the following would you support: raising taxes or raising more revenues from lotteries, Video Lottery Terminals and casinos?
  30. 30. Acceptability of New Gambling Concepts
  31. 31. Acceptability of New Gambling Concepts <ul><li>Another indicator of the public’s acceptability of gambling, and where product demand may focus, can be found in their reaction to new forms of gambling already available or considered in other parts of the world. </li></ul><ul><li>Nationally (to the right): </li></ul><ul><li>All products are electronically driven, but it is those which utilize the more widely-familiar internet that have the edge in support. Between 30% and 36% feel that online wagering, poker, lottery and casino sites would be highly or somewhat acceptable. </li></ul><ul><li>Of those products tested over the past three surveys, online poker saw the biggest increase in support, up 6%. Mobile devices have yet to garner significant interest. The concept of gambling on planes and trains remains enticing to under 30%. </li></ul><ul><li>Males, particularly younger ones, are more supportive of such products. Interestingly, support for all of these ideas increases with higher income and education level. </li></ul><ul><li>Regionally (next page): </li></ul><ul><li>Over 2007, Quebecers have shown a 6% increase in interest in TV gambling, but a 7% drop in interest in sports betting. </li></ul><ul><li>There have been considerable increases in support from every region for online poker. These sites, as well as wagering sites, top the list of “highly supportive” products at 10%. </li></ul><ul><li>Residents of British Columbia, Alberta and Ontario are most likely to accept these new gambling concepts while those in Quebec are least likely. </li></ul>D7. Of the following gambling activities, please indicate on a scale of 1 to 5 which you think are acceptable forms of gambling? Not Asked Not Asked
  32. 32. Acceptability of New Gambling Concepts: Regional Profile D7. Of the following gambling activities, please indicate on a scale of 1 to 5 which you think are acceptable forms of gambling? 40% 42% 34% 41% 26% 31% 36% Top 2 box Betting on sports through an online wagering site 13% 8% 6% 10% 7% 6% 9% Highly Acceptable   27% 34% 28% 31% 19% 25% 27% Somewhat Acceptable   27% 32% 25% 25% 17% 24% 24% Somewhat Acceptable 11% 7% 5% 8% 5% 4% 7% Highly Acceptable 38% 38% 30% 33% 23% 28% 31% Top 2 box Playing Casino type games for money through an Internet site 40% 43% 35% 38% 24% 32% 35% Top 2 box Playing Poker for money on the internet 12% 10% 10% 10% 7% 6% 9% Highly Acceptable   28% 34% 24% 28% 17% 26% 25% Somewhat Acceptable   18% 14% 15% 14% 9% 14% 13% Somewhat Acceptable   8% 4% 2% 5% 4% 3% 5% Highly Acceptable mobile phone or wireless device  26% 18% 17% 19% 12% 17% 18% Top 2 box Playing casino type games for money through a 28% 30% 24% 27% 18% 26% 24% Somewhat Acceptable   11% 6% 4% 7% 5% 4% 6% Highly Acceptable   39% 36% 27% 33% 23% 30% 31% Top 2 box Playing interactive lottery games on an Internet site 28% 21% 20% 22% 15% 24% 21% Somewhat Acceptable   8% 5% 6% 8% 4% 4% 6% Highly Acceptable   36% 25% 26% 30% 18% 28% 27% Top 2 box Playing casino type games in-flight or during train travel 21% 18% 17% 20% 14% 17% 18% Somewhat Acceptable   8% 4% 3% 6% 4% 4% 5% Highly Acceptable in-home interactive TV channel  29% 23% 20% 26% 18% 20% 23% Top 2 box Playing casino type games for money through an 28% 20% 18% 19% 12% 23% 19% Somewhat Acceptable   8% 7% 4% 8% 4% 6% 6% Highly Acceptable or wireless device  36% 27% 22% 27% 16% 28% 25% Top 2 box Purchasing lottery tickets through a mobile phone BC AB MB/SK ON QC ATL Canada PROVINCIAL PROFILE
  33. 33. Betting on Outcome of Sporting Events <ul><li>Although it is illegal for Canadians to wager on the outcome of a single sporting event, other than through a friendly wager between friends or family members, 40% of Canadians feel the laws should be changed to allow this kind of activity. </li></ul><ul><li>More than a third (35%) think wagering on sporting events should remain illegal in Canada, while a quarter think only betting on the outcome of multiple games should be allowed. </li></ul><ul><li>At provincial level, residents of Atlantic Canada and Quebec are the most likely to say wagering on the outcome of a single sporting events should remain illegal in Canada (45% each), while those in British Columbia say that betting on the single game should be legal (50%). </li></ul><ul><li>Young males are the strongest proponents of being able to bet on one game, or multiple games if the solo bet is not allowed. Far more females (45%) than males (25%) feel there should be no sports gambling. </li></ul>D7D. Do you believe the laws should be changed to allow people to legally wager on the outcome of a single sporting event, or not? Note: Question is not asked in 2006 and 2007.
  34. 34. Government Approval Ratings
  35. 35. Provincial Government Approval Ratings (collectively and by province ) <ul><li>Overall, Canadians seem to see the performance of their provincial government pretty much as they have in the past two years. Just half (52%; down 2% since 2007) of Canadians say they are satisfied with the performance of their provincial government, including 5% who say they are very satisfied. </li></ul><ul><li>Those in the Prairie provinces indicated the highest level of satisfaction with their provincial governments (61%), reflective of the strong majorities both governments won within a year before this survey. </li></ul><ul><li>In Atlantic Canada, the governments of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick have tenuous pluralities, while the two islands have newly re-elected governments with strong majorities, so the regionally high support falls largely on Premiers Williams and Ghiz in their respective domains. Despite that, overall support in the east has declined by 10% over the previous year. </li></ul><ul><li>Quebec and Ontario show equally divided support among their adult populations, with half satisfied and the other half not, though there are more Ontarians who are “very dissatisfied” with Premier McGuinty than there are Quebecers with Premier Charest. </li></ul><ul><li>At the time of this survey, British Columbia led the way with dissatisfied voters, at 55%, of which nearly a quarter are very dissatisfied with Premier Campbell’s government less than a year before they will go back to the polls. </li></ul>A2. Generally speaking, how satisfied are you with the performance of your provincial government? Would you say you are…
  36. 36. Government Performance: By Issues (three year comparison) <ul><li>How do the provincial governments fare when specifically graded on issues affecting Canadians? </li></ul><ul><li>Seven percent of Canadians are less satisfied this year than last with the jobs their provincial governments are doing in promoting their economies (32% down to 25%). </li></ul><ul><li>Over the past three years, there has been an 8% increase in the belief that governments are doing a good or very good job at regulating gambling (up to 23% from 19% last year and 15% in 2006). </li></ul><ul><li>A fifth feel that government is doing a good job providing a sound educational system (21%; up 2% in each of the past two years). </li></ul><ul><li>Only 13% (down 5% since 2006) feel their government is doing a good job in controlling public spending. </li></ul>A3. Please indicate on a scale of 1 to 5 whether you think your provincial government is doing a good job or a poor job on the responsibilities they are facing. Would you say the provincial government is doing a good job or a poor job in…? Note: % rated government as doing a good job (i.e., 4 or 5 out of 5). 13% 14% 11% Top 2 box Keeping taxes down 2% 3% 2% Very Good Job 11% 11% 9% Somewhat good job 16% 16% 14% Top 2 box Delivering health services   2% 2% 2% Very Good Job 14% 14% 12% Somewhat good job 21% 19% 17% Top 2 box Providing a sound educational system 3% 2% 2% Very Good Job 18% 17% 15% Somewhat good job 23% 19% 15% Top 2 box Regulating gambling activities 4% 3% 2% Very Good Job 19% 16% 13% Somewhat good job 12% 13% 11% Somewhat good job 3% 3% 3% Very Good Job 15% 16% 14% Top 2 box Keeping taxes from going up   10% 14% 14% Somewhat good job 3% 3% 4% Very Good Job 13% 17% 18% Top 2 box Controlling government spending  20% 25% 20% Somewhat good job 5% 7% 6% Very Good Job 25% 32% 26% Top 2 box Promoting economic growth in your province 2008 2007 2006 PROVINCIAL PROFILE  
  37. 37. Government Performance: By Issues (by region, 2008) <ul><li>Regionally, Albertans appear to be the happiest with their provincial government’s performance on these issues, rating all items except health care higher than the national average. Of significant note is that they nearly double the national average in their feelings that their politicians are doing a strong job promoting economic growth, yet that is down from a high of 69% last year. </li></ul><ul><li>In keeping with the aggregate numbers, British Columbians show significantly less support, over 2007, for their government’s handling of all the issues, particularly concerning the promotion of economic growth. </li></ul><ul><li>Quebec is the only province that rated all seven issues below the national level, but mostly by just a point or two. </li></ul><ul><li>Ontario residents remain very unimpressed with their government’s development performance (down 6%). </li></ul>A3. Please indicate on a scale of 1 to 5 whether you think your provincial government is doing a good job or a poor job on the responsibilities they are facing. Would you say the provincial government is doing a good job or a poor job in…? Note: % rated government as doing a good job (i.e., 4 or 5 out of 5). 13% 30% 17% 12% 14% 17% 15% Top 2 box Keeping taxes down 2% 6% 3% 2% 3% 3% 3% Very Good Job 11% 24% 14% 10% 11% 13% 12% Somewhat good job 9% 16% 24% 19% 16% 17% 17% Top 2 box Delivering health services   0% 1% 2% 3% 3% 3% 2% Very Good Job 9% 15% 22% 15% 13% 14% 14% Somewhat good job 12% 25% 26% 23% 20% 19% 21% Top 2 box Providing a sound educational system 1% 3% 3% 4% 3% 3% 3% Very Good Job 11% 22% 23% 19% 17% 16% 18% Somewhat good job 25% 25% 20% 26% 19% 21% 23% Top 2 box Regulating gambling activities 3% 1% 5% 4% 4% 3% 4% Very Good Job 22% 23% 15% 22% 15% 17% 19% Somewhat good job 12% 25% 10% 9% 9% 10% 11% Somewhat good job 1% 4% 3% 2% 3% 3% 2% Very Good Job 13% 28% 13% 10% 12% 13% 13% Top 2 box Keeping taxes from going up   13% 14% 15% 8% 8% 15% 10% Somewhat good job 1% 4% 4% 2% 2% 3% 3% Very Good Job 14% 18% 19% 10% 10% 18% 13% Top 2 box Controlling government spending  25% 36% 29% 15% 17% 21% 20% Somewhat good job 6% 13% 11% 3% 3% 8% 5% Very Good Job 31% 49% 41% 18% 20% 29% 25% Top 2 box Promoting economic growth in your province BC AB MB/SK ON QC ATL Canada PROVINCIAL PROFILE  
  38. 38. Regulating Gambling Activities <ul><li>Forty percent of Canadians are consistently ambivalent in rating how well their government is doing in regulating gambling. However, those who care to judge either way on this issue are shifting somewhat, with slow but steady increases and decreases on either end of the spectrum over each of the past two years. Regardless, those who think their government is doing a poor or very poor job significantly outweigh those who are happy or very happy with their province’s actions on the issue. </li></ul><ul><li>Regionally, Quebec leads the disappointment queue on this issue, remaining the only province where half of the population (48%) feels their government is falling down on this issue. </li></ul><ul><li>Younger Canadians truly straddle the fence on this issue, with 30% in the top two box and 31% in the bottom two. Those 35 and over are much more polarized, with approximately 20% feeling their government is doing a good or very good job, but double that (40%) saying poor or very poor. Perhaps interestingly, other than age, there are very insignificant differences in opinion based on sex, income or education. </li></ul>A3. Please indicate on a scale of 1 to 5 whether you think your provincial government is doing a good job or a poor job on the responsibilities they are facing. Would you say the provincial government is doing a good job or a poor job in… Regulating gambling activities?
  39. 39. Gambling “Public Pressure Barometer” <ul><li>By studying those who feel that gambling is a serious problem and that government is doing a poor job in regulating gambling, we are able to gauge the “barometer” of public pressure facing governments over gambling issues. Nationally, the “public pressure barometer” remains at 23%, as it was in 2007. </li></ul><ul><li>Provincially, British Columbia and Ontario are seen as having the least amount of “public pressure” (17% and 18%, respectively), while Atlantic Canada and Quebec are seen as the two regions with the highest degree of “public pressure” (29% and 32%, respectively). Manitoba and Saskatchewan have witnessed a steady decrease over the past two years, dropping from 33% in 2006 to 24% today. </li></ul><ul><li>At the extreme end of this barometer are those who think gambling addiction is a “very serious” problem and also feel the government is doing a “very poor job” in regulating gambling activities. Nationally, this more stringent measure remains steady at 6% over the past three studies. </li></ul>Note: % who feel that gambling is a serious problem and that the government is doing a poor job in regulating gambling. Nationally; Three Years Top Two Boxes Regionally; Three Years
  40. 40. Government Commitment to Easing Gambling Addiction <ul><li>In each of the past three studies, in true Canadian fashion, respondents feel that government has embraced balance as the most sensible approach when juggling the need and desire to increase gambling revenues with the need and desire to ease the problem of gambling addiction. Country-wide, two thirds (63%) feel this balance is the route governments are pursuing. </li></ul><ul><li>Equally consistent, close to 30% in each of the past three studies indicate they believe government is trying to encourage as much gambling as possible, while only a small proportion (6%) of Canadians feel government is strongly committed to easing the problem of gambling addiction. </li></ul><ul><li>At 42%, British Columbians are significantly higher than the national average of 31% in their belief their provincial government is trying to encourage gambling as much as possible. Over 70% of those in the three Prairie and the four Atlantic Provinces are cognizant of the balanced approach. </li></ul><ul><li>Those over 55 are significantly more prone to feel governments are trying to encourage more gambling, with just one third (36%) of them saying just that, while less than a third (29%) under 55 feel that way. There are no notable variances based on gender, income or education. </li></ul>D4. Do you think the government agencies that are involved in gaming and lotteries are committed to trying to ease the problem of gambling activities, or are simply pre-occupied with trying to encourage as much gambling as possible?
  41. 41. Casino Control and Operation <ul><li>Canadians are by and large (88%) in agreement that governments should maintain ownership of casinos, though only 38% feel government should actually be running them. </li></ul><ul><li>Regionally, Quebecers feel most strongly that the province should continue to own and to operate casinos (52% support this option). </li></ul><ul><li>Respondents in Alberta and British Columbia report that the ownership of casinos should remain with the provincial government, but should be run by the private sector (62% and 60% respectively). </li></ul><ul><li>In the previous survey, Atlantic Canadians also strongly supported this option, but they have wavered somewhat in the past year, dropping from 58% to 51%. </li></ul>D7B. Which of the following scenarios do you support more? Note: Question is not asked in 2006.
  42. 42. Use of Gambling Funding <ul><li>Canadians continue to feel health care (73%), hospitals (71%), and problem gambling education and research (68%) should be the three main benefactors of gambling revenues. These garner extremely broad-based support across every demographic, and usually in that order. </li></ul><ul><li>Paying off the provincial debt and donations to non-profit charitable organizations also receive strong support at 58% each. </li></ul><ul><li>Regionally, respondents from Ontario lead the way in support of health initiatives, be it toward better services or infrastructure. This represents a significant increase over the previous year, in both categories (up by 6%). </li></ul><ul><li>The three Prairie Provinces are more likely than the rest of Canada to want gambling profits diverted to problem gambling and amateur sports programs. </li></ul><ul><li>Understandably, as the 2010 Olympics draw nearer, British Columbians increasingly feel that gambling revenue could be directed toward Olympic athletes, jumping from 33% in 2007 to 45% this year. Those furthest away from BC show substantially less support for this option. </li></ul><ul><li>With no debt, it is not surprising that Albertans rank paying off provincial debt as their least desirable option. </li></ul>D7CC. Gambling revenues are used to fund various activities, causes, charities and organizations in your province. Which of the following do you think should be funded by gambling revenues in your province? Note: Question is not asked in 2006. 45% 41% 36% 42% 28% 28% 37% Olympic athletes and programs 9% 9% 4% 7% 5% 5% 6% Other 51% 49% 53% 55% 54% 52% 53% Public education 54% 51% 50% 44% 29% 35% 42% Amateur Sports programs 55% 38% 62% 60% 61% 51% 58% Pay off Provincial Debt 60% 64% 56% 64% 51% 45% 58% Non-profit charitable org 70% 73% 72% 68% 62% 69% 68% Problem Gambling education, research and treatment 71% 62% 73% 76% 69% 56% 71% Hospitals 43% 42% 45% 41% 28% 31% 38% Recreational and cultural activities 73% 62% 74% 76% 73% 65% 73% Healthcare BC AB MB/SK ON QC ATL Canada PROVINCIAL PROFILE
  43. 43. Attitudes Towards Gambling
  44. 44. Attitudes Towards Gambling <ul><li>The survey included 27 questions asking respondents to rate a list of attributes related to gambling issues. Because these attributes may essentially be measuring only a few different underlying dimensions or ‘factors’, we used a factor analysis to reduce the number of variables we needed to consider. Through factor analysis techniques, four distinct “attitude factor solutions” were identified 2 . For example, when evaluating attitudes towards gambling, questions about banning VLT’s, placing more restrictions on gambling and placing a moratorium on casino expansion may all be measuring “gambling problem concerns”. If this is the case, then these three questions would all be interrelated, meaning that respondents who provided high scores for the first question also provided high scores for the other two (and vice-versa). </li></ul><ul><li>Thus, factor analysis is a very useful tool for condensing and simplifying data. This can be particularly valuable when summarizing findings and drawing conclusions. Another advantage of factor analysis is that it can be used for subsequent statistical analysis, such as cluster analysis to determine segments in the population that are different from each other. These segments are presented in the next section. </li></ul><ul><li>The factors that are derived from the 27 variables can be mapped along a continuum that reflects the degree of support for the way gambling policy is implemented in each of the regions across Canada. The range of attitudes goes from support for the way gambling is regulated to acceptance of the status quo to a great concern for the problems that gambling creates. </li></ul><ul><li>The four attitude factor solutions are as follows: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gambling Problem Concerns </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gambling Provides Economic Benefits </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Personal Choice to Gamble </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gambling Status Quo </li></ul></ul>2 Naming of Factors: Once all significant loadings are identified, an attempt is made to assign some meaning to the factors based on the patterns of the factor loadings. To do this, we examine the significant loadings for each factor (column). In general, the larger the absolute size of the factor loading for a variable, the more important the variable is in interpreting the factor. The sign of the loadings also needs to be considered in labeling the factors. Factor loadings represent the correlation or linear association between a variable and the latent factor(s). Considering all the variables' loading on a factor, including the size and sign of the loading, a determination is made as to what the underlying factor may represent.
  45. 45. Attitude Factor Solutions <ul><li>1. Gambling Problem Concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Nine variables loaded highly on the “gambling problem concerns” factor. The variables are presented in the chart in the order that they influence the factor grouping. </li></ul><ul><li>Overall, and most significantly, concerns over gambling remain strong but have been reduced considerably since 2007. </li></ul><ul><li>This factor signifies that Canadians feel more restrictions should be placed on gambling activities (34% somewhat or strongly agreed) either in the form of a ban on VLT’s (30%), restricting casino expansion (44%), or limiting VLT’s to racetracks and casinos (61%). </li></ul><ul><li>As well, Canadians feel that the government should cut back on the advertisement and promotion of lotteries and gambling activities (55%), and instead they should spend more money on preventing and treating gambling addiction (50%). </li></ul><ul><li>Canadians also tend to believe that more opportunities to gamble has led to an increase in the number of problem gamblers (68%), and that there has been an increase in gambling related problems over the past three years (52%). Also, respondents indicate that those with gambling problems are most likely to be the ones who can least afford to lose money (62%). </li></ul>D1/D3/D6. For the next few questions, please indicate on a scale of 1 to 5 is you agree or disagree with the statement. Note: % who agree (strongly agree or agree) with each statement. <ul><li>There have been several downward shifts in attitude since 2007: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The provincial government should be doing more to restrict gambling in my province (down 7%). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Video Lottery gambling should be banned in Canada (down 7%). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Video Lottery terminals should be limited to casinos and race track (down 6%). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The provincial government should cut back on its advertising and promotion of lotteries and gambling (down 4%). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Those with gambling problems are those who can least afford to lose money (down 3%). </li></ul></ul>65% 67% 52% 56% 37% 59% 48% 72% 41% 2007 62% 58% Those with gambling problems are those who can least afford to lose money 61% 62% Video Lottery terminals should be limited to casinos and race track 50% 51% The Provincial government should spend more money on preventing and treating gambling addiction 52% 55% Gambling related problems have increased in the past 3 years 30% 33% Video Lottery gambling should be banned in Canada 55% 53% The provincial government should cut back on its advertising and promotion of lotteries and gambling 44% 47% There should be a moratorium on future casino expansion 68% 71% More opportunities to gamble has led to an increase in the number of problem gamblers 34% 37% The provincial government should be doing more to restrict gambling in my province 2008 2006 (Top 2 Box Scores)
  46. 46. Attitude Factor Solutions <ul><li>2. Gambling Provides Economic Benefits </li></ul><ul><li>The factor label “gambling provides economic benefits” consists of six variables highly related to economic benefits of gambling. </li></ul><ul><li>This group represents Canadians who feel gambling is an acceptable activity (57%), and is an activity that provides opportunities for economic development in their province (33%), and for aboriginal groups (40%). These opportunities include tangible economic development such as increased employment (30%), attracting tourism dollars (24%), and intangible benefits of improving the quality of life (9%). </li></ul>3. Personal Choice to Gamble The “personal choice to gamble” factor consists of three variables related to an individual’s personal choice to gamble. These Canadians agree it is up to each individual to control their gambling participation (78%), that people will find ways to gamble even if it illegal (90%), and that it is their right to gamble regardless of consequences (49%). D1/D3/D6. For the next few questions, please indicate on a scale of 1 to 5 is you agree or disagree with the statement. Note: % who agree (strongly agree or agree) with each statement. <ul><li>There have been two significant downward attitudinal shifts since 2007: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gambling provides opportunities for economic development in my province </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(down 3%). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gambling provides opportunities for economic development on reserves </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(down 3%). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>There have been two significant upward attitudinal shifts since 2007: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>People will find a way to gamble even if it is illegal (up 3%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It is my right to gamble regardless of the consequences (up 5%) </li></ul></ul>58% 26% 43% 9% 31% 36% 2007 57% 57% On the whole gambling is an acceptable activity in my province 24% 25% My province needs gambling to attract tourists 40% 41% Gambling provides opportunities for economic development on reserves 9% 8% Gambling has improved the quality of life in my province 30% 32% Gambling has increased overall employment in my province 33% 35% Gambling provides opportunities for economic development in my province 2008 2006 (Top 2 Box Scores: Strongly Agree or Agree) 87% 44% 76% 2007 90% 86% People will find a way to gamble even if it is illegal 49% 42% It is my right to gamble regardless of the consequences 78% 74% Its up to each individual to control their own participation in gambling activities 2008 2006 (Top 2 Box Scores: Strongly Agree or Agree)
  47. 47. Attitude Factor Solutions 4. Gambling Status Quo Those within the “gambling status quo” factor (six variables), include Canadians who most strongly agree that legalized gambling is a good way to raise revenues for the provincial treasuries (45%) and that such revenue should be used to pay off debt (56%) They also feel their provincial government is doing a good job in regulating gambling (25%), and that adequate services are already in place to deal with problem gambling (25%). Canadians who support the status quo for gambling activities also view gambling at charitable events as a donation to charity (44%). <ul><li>Attitudes Not Assigned </li></ul><ul><li>These factors were dropped from the analysis in order to provide comparable results between 2006 and 2008. </li></ul><ul><li>Of interest, Canadians feel less restrictive in the ban on internet gambling since last year. </li></ul><ul><li>There have been two downward attitudinal shifts since 2007: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Profits from government run gambling and lotteries go to worthwhile causes (down five percentage points) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Internet gambling should be banned (down 8%) </li></ul></ul>D1/D3/D6. For the next few questions, please indicate on a scale of 1 to 5 is you agree or disagree with the statement. Note: % who agree (strongly agree or agree) with each statement. <ul><li>There has been one downward attitudinal shifts since 2007: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The benefits of increased provincial tax revenues offset the negative influences of gambling (down two percentage points) </li></ul></ul>46% 59% 43% 2007 41% 42% Profits from government run gambling and lotteries go to worthwhile causes 58% N/A The provincial government should do more to address problem gambling issues 35% N/A Internet gambling should be banned in Canada 2008 2006 (Top 2 Box Scores: Strongly Agree or Agree) 58% 45% 46% 19% 25% 24% 2007 56% 57% Gambling revenue should be used to help governments pay off debt 45% 44% Legalized gambling is a good way to raise tax revenues for the province 44% 43% Gambling at charitable events is not really gambling it is like a donation to charity 17% 18% The benefits of increased provincial tax revenues offset the negative influences of gambling 25% 25% The provincial government is doing a good job of regulating gambling in my province 25% 23% Adequate services are in place to deal with problem gambling 2008 2006 (Top 2 Box Scores: Strongly Agree or Agree)
  48. 48. Gambling Attitude Segmentation
  49. 49. Gambling Attitudes Segmentation <ul><li>Using a cluster analysis 3 technique with the four factor scores outlined in the previous section, four segments are derived to best represent the diversity of attitudes in the Canadian population. These four segments and the percentage of the population they represent are shown in the exhibit. </li></ul><ul><li>Up from 18% in 2007 to 22% in 2008, more Canadians feel that the problems of gambling far out weigh the benefits. </li></ul><ul><li>On par with last year, one quarter of Canadians see the benefits that gambling provides but are also concerned about the problems that may arise from too much gambling. </li></ul><ul><li>Substantially lower than last year (12% drop), only 23% now see gambling as a benefit to the economy. Most of this drop moved to the “gambling freedom” segment which saw an increase of 9% over last year. </li></ul>3 Cluster Analysis is a multivariate analysis technique that seeks to organize information about variables so that relatively homogeneous groups, or &quot;clusters,&quot; can be formed. The clusters formed with this family of methods should be highly internally homogenous (members are similar to one another) and highly externally heterogeneous (members are no t like members of other clusters. Cluster analysis is an exploratory data analysis tool for solving classification problems. Its object is to sort cases into segments or clusters, so that the degree of association is strong between members of the same cluster and weak between members of different clusters. Each cluster thus describes, in terms of the data collected, the segment to which its members belong.
  50. 50. Attitude Segments: Regional Profile <ul><li>Regionally, there are some considerable differences within the segments: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Alberta (59%), British Columbia (58%) and Ontario (58%) are the leading provinces in terms of support for gambling. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Atlantic Canada led that group in 2007 at 63%, but with a 22% drop, they now join Quebec, which also dropped, as the least supportive, well below the national average. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Canada wide, except in the Atlantic and Quebec, support for “gambling freedom” has increased since 2007. Conversely, there has been a substantial decrease in those who feel that gambling benefits the economy. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gambling opposition is lowest in Manitoba/Saskatchewan (15%), but they also lead, at 30%, those who feel they are concerned but can see the benefits. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Atlantic Canadians are most adamant that gambling problems outweigh the benefits, at 36%, a twelve point increase over last year. </li></ul></ul>2008 National Gambling Report 19% 19% 30% 26% 32% 15% 25% Concerned But See Benefits Gambling Supporters but Concerned 20% 23% 20% 25% 22% 21% 23% Gambling Benefits Economy 23% 23% 15% 16% 27% 36% 22% Problems Outweigh Benefits Gambling Opposition 38% 36% 35% 33% 19% 27% 30% Gambling Freedom 58% 59% 55% 58% 41% 48% 53% Gambling Supporters BC AB MB/SK ON QC ATL Canada PROVINCIAL PROFILE FOR SEGMENTS
  51. 51. Attitude Segment Solutions <ul><li>Gambling Freedom (30%) </li></ul><ul><li>Of those considered to be a part of the “gambling supporter” segment, the “Gambling Freedom” segment encompasses nearly one third of all Canadians. They support the status quo. </li></ul><ul><li>This group believes it is up to each individual to control participation in gambling activities (mean factor loading of 0.48) regardless of the consequences. </li></ul><ul><li>They get that gambling provides economic benefits, but still have serious concerns. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gambling Behaviour: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>While lottery play is common with the “Gambling Freedom” segment, this group exhibits lower levels of participation in gambling activities with almost three in five having not participated in any gambling activities in the past twelve months. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gambling is not perceived as being important by this group; three quarters (76%) indicated that participation in gambling activities is “not at all important” to them. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social Issues and Acceptability: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Gambling Freedom” respondents are more in favour or raising taxes to increase provincial revenue instead of through increased gambling revenue. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Not being avid gamblers, it is not surprising that they awarded lower than average acceptability ratings across all new forms of gambling concepts tested. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Government Approval Ratings: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This segment does not feel that their government is doing a good job in general (only a 47% approval rating), particularly in the area of regulating gambling activities (only a 13% approval rating). This may be due to the fact that the segment is more likely to indicate that their government is trying to encourage as much gambling as possible. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Demographics: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Gambling Freedom” respondents are more likely to be from Quebec or Atlantic Canada, and less likely to be from British Columbia or Ontario. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They are also more likely to save their money over spending or investing it. </li></ul></ul>2008 National Gambling Report
  52. 52. Attitude Segment Solutions <ul><li>Gambling Benefits Economy (23%) The second group of gambling supporters, the “gambling benefits the economy” segment, is comprised of nearly a quarter of all Canadians, down from 35% last year. </li></ul><ul><li>This segment is defined by its mean factor loading (0.23) on attitude statements related to the benefits of gambling for economic development in each of the provinces. </li></ul><ul><li>Respondents in this segment had a negative mean score (-0.26) for the factor associated with gambling problem concerns and certainly do not support the belief that gambling is a personal choice. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gambling Behaviour: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Within this segment, problem gamblers remain at 10%. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Unlike previous years, this group gambled less this year than the “See Benefits, But Concerned” grouping, with 4% fewer buying lottery tickets last year over 2007 and 17% less visiting casinos. In both cases the “SBBC” has surpassed this segment by as much as 5%. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social Issues and Acceptability: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Within this segment, 29% say they know someone with a gambling problem. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Four in ten feel that gambling addiction is a serious concern. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Though they express more concern than the “Gambling Freedom” segment over all of the noted issues, their level of concern is far lower than the other two. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This group is pretty much on par with the “See Benefits but Concerned” segment in terms of support for new games, all rated under 30%. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Government Approval Ratings: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>As with last year, this segment leads in their support for their government at 57%. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They straddle the national average of 23% support for efforts to regulate gambling, but that is a six point drop over last year. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They are the staunchest supporters of governments owning casinos, but allowing the private sector to run them. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Demographics: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Two thirds in this category live in Central Canada, make under $80,000, and are more than ten years from retirement. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Females outnumbered males in this category with 55% to 45%. </li></ul></ul>2008 National Gambling Report
  53. 53. Attitude Segment Solutions <ul><li>Problems Outweigh Benefits (22%) </li></ul><ul><li>The “problems outweigh benefits” segment is more likely to be concerned about gambling problems (mean factor loading of 0.56). This group does not see the economic benefits (-1.12) as a result of gambling activities. </li></ul><ul><li>They are also more likely to disagree with gambling as a personal choice (mean factor loading of -0.15), and are unhappy with the gambling status quo (-0.49). </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gambling Behaviour: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This segment, more than a fifth of the population, includes 22% who have never gambled, 17% lapsed gamblers, and the lowest percentage of problem gamblers (9%). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They do tend to see charity or cause lotteries as acceptable as do the other segments. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>85% did not step foot in a casino last year. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social Issues and Acceptability: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Over 50% of this group say they personally know someone who has a gambling problem. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Unlike the second lowest placing in the other three segments, gambling addiction only follows drug addiction as the major concern of this group. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Nationally, 33% would prefer raising taxes to more gambling; for this segment, it is 65%. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Government Approval Ratings: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This group has the lowest satisfaction level with government, rating theirs below the national average on all issues. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Only 9% are satisfied with the regulation of gambling activities. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In past years this segment showed most support for gambling revenue being directed toward problem gambling; this year support for health care rivals for their good will. Further, at 64%, they are now below the national average (68%) in terms of the importance of directing the revenue back to helping gamblers. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This group is seen as having a high amount of “public pressure”, thinking that gambling is a serious problem and that the government is doing a poor job in regulating in this area. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Demographics: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>These respondents are more likely to be older (35+), from Quebec with average income, with a degree, and employed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A greater percentage of Atlantic Canadians fall into this category than into any other. </li></ul></ul>2008 National Gambling Report
  54. 54. Attitude Segment Solutions <ul><li>See Benefits But Concerned (25%) </li></ul><ul><li>The benefits over concern ratios for this group has changed somewhat over the past year. In 2007 the mean factor loading for benefits was +0.65; this year it is +0.50, but more significantly, concerns with gambling (+0.77 this year; +0.64 in 2007) have surpassed benefits. </li></ul><ul><li>The other two factors remain mostly unchanged from last year, though it should be noted that this segment views those issues in more of a positive light than do the other categories except the Gambling Freedom group. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gambling Behaviour: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This segment exhibited higher than average participation in lottery play in the past 12 months (85%). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They also showed above-average participation in other forms of gambling (48%). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social Issues and Acceptability: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Over two fifths (43%) know someone with a problem. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They show greater concern on all of the issues than do those in other segments (excepting gambling for those who feel problems out-weigh benefits. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Two thirds clearly see the benefits of raising revenues through gambling activities and would prefer this option over raising taxes. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Government Approval Ratings: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This segment, overall, shows more support for government than the national average, and that is reflected with their near average ratings on individual issues. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This is the only group which primarily feels government should operate casinos. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They are strong believers that money from gambling should be funneled into health issues. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Demographics: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Though somewhat older than the other categories, and more likely to be retired, there is little else that distinguishes them from the general population. </li></ul></ul>2008 National Gambling Report
  55. 55. Attitude Segments Profile: Gambling Behaviour 2008 National Gambling Report 70% 56% 64% 73% 66% Lotto 649 or Super 7 Lottery Games Played (Past 2 Months) 41% 28% 42% 49% 41% Scratch and Win or Instant Win lottery tickets 11% 10% 12% 14% 12% Charity or cause lottery tickets 7% 5% 5% 10% 7% Hospital lottery tickets 4% 1% 2% 4% 3% Sports lottery games 5% 4% 6% 6% 5% Other lottery games 16% 35% 22% 13% 21% Not in past 2 months 77% 62% 71% 81% 73% Lotto 649 or Super 7 Lottery Games Played (Past 12 Months) 55% 38% 52% 64% 54% Scratch and Win or Instant Win lottery tickets 25% 24% 24% 28% 25% Charity or cause lottery tickets 15% 12% 13% 18% 15% Hospital lottery tickets 6% 2% 4% 7% 5% Sports lottery games 9% 6% 10% 11% 9% Other lottery games 15% 31% 20% 12% 19% Not in past 12 months 48% 32% 43% 61% 47% Participated in Past 12 Months Overall Participation Rates – Gambling Activities 33% 22% 30% 46% 34% Participated in Past 2 Months 85% 69% 80% 88% 81% Played Lotteries in Past 12 Months Overall Participation Rates – Lotteries 84% 65% 78% 87% 79% Played Lotteries in Past 2 Months 22% 14% 23% 29% 23% I like to gamble when the opportunity arises 8% 17% 7% 4% 9% I have gambled before but I don't anymore 10% 22% 14% 7% 13% I have never gambled Gambling Behaviour 11% 9% 10% 14% 11% Regular/Problem Gamblers 17% 15% 16% 13% 15% I only gamble when there are large jackpots involved   31% 23% 30% 32% 29% I only gamble on social occasions See Benefits But Concerned Problems Outweigh Benefits Gambling Benefits Economy Gambling Freedom Total    
  56. 56. Attitude Segments Profile: Gambling Behaviour (continued) 2008 National Gambling Report 35% 44% 33% 29% 35% Less 56% 47% 55% 61% 55% About the same 9% 8% 12% 11% 10% More Future Gambling Intentions 30% 16% 27% 42% 30% Gambled at a casino Gambling Activities Participated In (Past 12 Months) 11% 7% 10% 18% 12% Gambled on a private game 9% 6% 9% 11% 9% Played Bingo for money 7% 6% 8% 12% 8% An electronic gaming machine outside of a casino 5% 4% 3% 9% 6% Bet on the outcome of sports or other events 4% 2% 4% 5% 4% Placed a bet on a horse race 3% 3% 4% 5% 4% Called a broker or gone online to trade stocks 3% 1% 2% 5% 3% Placed a wager through an Internet casino 6% 5% 6% 10% 7% Gambled on any other kind of games 52% 68% 57% 39% 53% Not in past 12 months 18% 9% 14% 27% 18% Gambled at a casino Gambling Activities Participated In (Past 2 Months) 6% 5% 6% 11% 7% Gambled on a private game 5% 4% 5% 7% 6% An electronic gaming machine outside of a casino 5% 3% 6% 7% 5% Played Bingo for money 2% 2% 2% 6% 3% Bet on the outcome of sports or other events 2% 3% 3% 4% 3% Called a broker or gone online to trade stocks 2% 1% 1% 4% 2% Placed a wager through an Internet casino 2% 0% 1% 2% 1% Placed a bet on a horse race 4% 3% 3% 7% 5% Gambled on any other kind of games 67% 78% 70% 54% 66% Not in past 2 months See Benefits But Concerned Problems Outweigh Benefits Gambling Benefits Economy Gambling Freedom Total    
  57. 57. Attitude Segments Profile: Social Issues & Acceptability 2008 National Gambling Report 18% 8% 18% 44% 23% Playing casino type games for money through an in-home interactive TV channel 6% 8% 5% 7% 6% Never Budget Consideration 4% 5% 4% 4% 4% Rarely before gambling 8% 7% 14% 11% 10% Sometimes 14% 12% 16% 18% 16% Often 68% 68% 61% 60% 64% Always 26% 11% 22% 59% 31% Playing casino type games for money through an Internet site 27% 12% 29% 65% 35% Playing Poker for money on the Internet 29% 13% 30% 67% 36% Betting on sports through an online wagering site Acceptability of New Gambling Concepts 43% 51% 29% 29% 37% Yes Problem Gambling Perceptions 70% 73% 59% 56% 64% Drug Addiction Seriousness of Social Problems 71% 60% 57% 50% 60% Driving above the Speed limit 67% 62% 53% 46% 57% Smoking addiction 66% 62% 54% 44% 57% Alcohol abuse 60% 54% 50% 51% 54% Crime rates 62% 67% 40% 28% 48% Gambling addiction 43% 43% 38% 33% 40% Unemployment rates 32% 65% 32% 16% 33% Raising taxes More Gambling vs. More Taxes 68% 35% 68% 84% 67% Raising more revenues from lotteries/video terminals/casinos 27% 10% 24% 56% 31% Playing interactive lottery games for money on an Internet site 22% 8% 22% 49% 27% Playing casino type games for money in-flight or during train travel 20% 11% 20% 44% 25% Purchasing lottery tickets through a mobile phone or wireless device 13% 5% 15% 35% 18% Playing casino type games for money through a mobile phone or wireless device See Benefits But Concerned Problems Outweigh Benefits Gambling Benefits Economy Gambling Freedom Total    
  58. 58. Attitude Segments Profile: Government Approval Ratings 2008 National Gambling Report 64% 45% 62% 60% 58% Non-profit charitable org (ie . Cancer, Diabetes) 73% 64% 66% 67% 68% Problem Gambling education, research and treatment 54% 46% 50% 63% 53% Public education 64% 45% 52% 66% 58% Pay off Provincial Debt 74% 60% 67% 78% 71% Hospitals 77% 64% 71% 78% 73% Health care Use of Gambling Funding 45% 44% 56% 55% 50% Casinos owned by prov. gov't, operated by private sector Casino Control and Operation 27% 48% 13% 7% 23% Very/Somewhat serious problem & Very/Somewhat poor job Gambling “Public Pressure Barometer” 5% 16% 1% 1% 6% Very serious problem & Very poor job 6% 2% 5% 8% 5% Committed to trying to ease gambling addiction Government Commitment to Easing Gambling Addiction 29% 53% 28% 16% 31% Trying to encourage as much gambling as possible 64% 44% 66% 75% 62% Trying to do both 0% 0% 2% 1% 1% Not Sure 54% 39% 57% 55% 51% % Very + Somewhat Satisfied Government Approval Ratings 26% 21% 28% 27% 25% Promoting economic growth in your province Government Performance 21% 9% 23% 35% 23% Regulating gambling activities 26% 14% 21% 21% 21% Providing a sound educational system 19% 11% 19% 17% 17% Delivering health services 15% 12% 15% 18% 15% Keeping taxes from going up 15% 11% 12% 14% 13% Keeping taxes down 12% 12% 12% 13% 13% Controlling government spending 48% 39% 35% 31% 38% Casinos owned and operated by prov. gov't 7% 17% 9% 14% 12% Casinos owned and operated by private sector 46% 29% 45% 49% 42% Amateur Sports programs 39% 29% 40% 42% 38% Recreational and cultural activities 43% 24% 40% 41% 37% Olympic athletes and programs 6% 7% 6% 7% 6% Other See Benefits But Concerned Problems Outweigh Benefits Gambling Benefits Economy Gambling Freedom Total    
  59. 59. Attitude Segments Profile: Demographics X1. In what year were you born? S3. Are you…? X2. What is the highest level of education that you have completed? X3. Which of the following best describes your current job status? X4. Was your total household income for 2005 under or over $60,000? And would that be? A6. If you were given ten thousand dollars, which of the following things are you most likely to do with it? 34% 31% 32% 33% 32% $40,000 to under $80,000 31% 30% 24% 16% 25% Quebec 36% 32% 37% 33% 34% Under $40,000 Income 15% 17% 14% 20% 17% $80,000 or more   16% 20% 17% 14% 17% Refused   10% 14% 12% 17% 13% British Columbia Region 6% 9% 8% 10% 8% Alberta 10% 6% 7% 10% 8% Manitoba/Saskatchewan 39% 28% 41% 41% 38% Ontario 5% 13% 7% 7% 8% Atlantic 7% 5% 7% 7% 7% Homemaker 3% 5% 6% 4% 5% Student 20% 11% 14% 19% 15% Retired 25% 18% 22% 18% 21% High school or less Education 26% 27% 28% 27% 27% Some college/university   48% 54% 50% 55% 52% Completed college/university 34% 36% 27% 22% 29% 55+ 7% 5% 10% 9% 8% Not currently employed 53% 64% 56% 52% 56% Working, full-time or part-time 9% 10% 6% 9% 9% Self-employed Job Status 52% 51% 55% 48% 52% Female   48% 49% 45% 52% 48% Male Gender 44% 39% 42% 41% 41% 35-54   22% 24% 30% 37% 29% 18-34 Age See Benefits But Concerned Problems Outweigh Benefits Gambling Benefits Economy Gambling Freedom Total    
  60. 60. Canadian Problem Gambling Index
  61. 61. CPGI Definitions <ul><li>The Canadian Problem Gambling Index (CPGI) is based on a battery of nine questions that are asked to all respondents. These questions are: </li></ul><ul><li>How often… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>have you bet more than you could really afford to lose? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>have you needed to gamble with larger amounts of money to get the same feeling of excitement? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>did you go back another day to try to win back the money you lost? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>have you borrowed money or sold anything to get money to gamble? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>have you felt that you might have a problem with gambling? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>have people criticized your betting or told you that you had a gambling problem, regardless of whether or not you thought it was true? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>have you felt guilty about the way you gamble or what happens when you gamble? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>has gambling caused you any health problems, including stress or anxiety? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>has your gambling caused any financial problems for you or your household? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Respondents are asked to answer these questions using a four-point scale of never, some of the time, most of the time and almost always. These groupings are based on how respondents answer the nine questions. </li></ul>5 Respondents are categorized based on the total score for all nine responses to these questions. CPGI score of 8 or more points Severe Problem gamblers CPGI score of 3 to 7 points Moderate Problem gamblers CPGI score of 1 or 2 points At risk gamblers CPGI score of 0 Non-problem gamblers Have not gambled in past 12 months Non Gamblers Definition: Group 5 :
  62. 62. CPGI Scores <ul><li>The majority (76%) of Canadians are considered non-gamblers or non-problem gamblers according to the CPGI. One-fifth (20%) are considered “problem” gamblers, including 14% who are considered to be “at-risk” and 6% who are “moderate problem gamblers”. The CPGI showed that only a small proportion of Canadians are “severe problem” gamblers (4%). </li></ul><ul><li>Since the 2007 study, the percentage of problem gamblers and severe problem gamblers has increased (by four percentage points and two percentage points, respectively). </li></ul><ul><li>At the provincial level, respondents from Alberta are more likely to be “at-risk” gamblers at 27%. </li></ul>20% 76% 2008 National Gambling Report 5% 3% 3% 3% 5% 4% 4% Severe problem gamblers 6% 9% 7% 6% 7% 4% 6% Moderate problem gamblers 14% 19% 16% 15% 13% 13% 14% At risk gamblers 20% 27% 23% 21% 19% 17% 21% At risk/Moderate 65% 56% 60% 64% 62% 65% 63% Non-problem gamblers 11% 14% 14% 12% 14% 15% 13% Non gamblers 76% 70% 74% 76% 76% 80% 76% Non Problem/Non Gamblers BC AB MB/SK ON QC ATL Canada CPGI Category
  63. 63. CPGI Scores <ul><li>Down from 82% last year, in 2007 just over three quarters of Canadians (76%) are considered non-gamblers or non-problem gamblers according to the CPGI. </li></ul><ul><li>Twenty percent (up from 16% in 2007) are considered “problem” gamblers, including 14% who are considered to be “at-risk” and 6% who are “moderate problem gamblers”. </li></ul><ul><li>The CPGI showed that only a small proportion of Canadians are “severe problem” gamblers (4%) </li></ul><ul><li>At the provincial level, 80% of respondents from Atlantic Canada are non-problem/non-gamblers, but this is down 6% over last year. On the opposite end of the spectrum, Albertans lead the pack with the most at risk or moderate gamblers, at 27%, a ten percent increase over last year. </li></ul>20% 76% 2008 National Gambling Report 5% 3% 3% 3% 5% 4% 4% Severe problem gamblers 6% 9% 7% 6% 7% 4% 6% Moderate problem gamblers 14% 19% 16% 15% 13% 13% 14% At risk gamblers 20% 27% 23% 21% 19% 17% 21% At risk/Moderate 65% 56% 60% 64% 62% 65% 63% Non-problem gamblers 11% 14% 14% 12% 14% 15% 13% Non gamblers 76% 70% 74% 76% 76% 80% 76% Non Problem/Non Gamblers BC AB MB/SK ON QC ATL Canada CPGI Category
  64. 64. CPGI: Key Differences <ul><li>Non Gamblers (13%): Have not gambled in past 12 months </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gambling Behaviour: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>By definition, “Non- Gamblers” do not participate in any gambling activities. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social Issues and Acceptability: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It is not surprising that they exhibit the lowest ratings across all the new gambling concepts tested. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This segment is in favour of raising taxes over raising more revenues through gambling. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They are the most likely segment to say that betting on the outcome of sporting events should remain illegal in Canada. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They are least likely to know someone with gambling problems </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Government Approval Ratings: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interestingly, it is this group, the non-gambler, and its antithesis, the severe problem gambler, which feel most strongly that gambling is a very serious problem and that their provincial government is doing poorly at regulating gambling activities. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This segment feels their government is trying to encourage as much gambling as possible. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They rate all potential recipients of gambling revenue much lower than the national average, though pretty much in the same order. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Demographics: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They are more likely than the other groups to be women. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They are more likely to be students or seniors than all other groups. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They are more likely to be over 55 years than any other group. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Non-Problem Gamblers (63%): CPGI score of 0 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gambling Behaviour: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This segment contains the highest percentage (11%) of lapsed gamblers. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Over 90% have played the lotteries in the past year, just less than the other gambling segments. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>However, only 45% otherwise gambled during that period, substantially lower than all other gamblers . Only 13% stepped foot inside a casino. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They are jackpot driven, social gamblers, requiring stimulus to participate. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They are significantly more likely than other segments to decide on a budget before they start to gamble. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social Issues and Acceptability: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This segment is less likely to know someone personally who has a gambling problem. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They straddle the national average in their acceptability of new gaming concepts. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Government Approval Ratings: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This group is a strong reflection of the general public in that they are very near the national average on questions concerning government and policy. </li></ul></ul>2008 National Gambling Report
  65. 65. CPGI: Key Differences <ul><li>At Risk Gamblers (14%): CPGI score of 1 or 2 points </li></ul><ul><li>Gambling Behaviour: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ At Risk Gamblers” self-classify as opportunistic or social gamblers, with 14% indicating they are regular or professional gamblers. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>97% play the lotteries, and 74% have participated in other forms of gambling in the past 12 months. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>One third gambled in a casino in the two months preceding this study. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social Issues and Acceptability: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Over 40% know of someone with a gambling problem. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Along with their counterparts to your right (Moderate Problem Gamblers), this group is the most supportive of the new concepts, with very high interest in playing poker and wagering online. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Government Approval Ratings: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Their “public pressure barometer” is by far the lowest of all groups. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They recognize the need for government to both promote gambling, and to tend to the issue of problem gambling. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Nearly three quarters feel problem gambling education and research is a crucial beneficiary of such revenue. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Demographics: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They are more likely to be men (56% to 44%), and middle-aged. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Half have a degree or diploma; only 13% is making over $80,000. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Moderate Problem Gamblers (6%): CPGI score of 3 to 7 points </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gambling Behaviour: </li></ul></ul><ul><li>“ Moderate Problem Gamblers” self-classify as opportunistic gamblers. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>They gamble when the opportunity arises, and they are regular gamblers. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>One quarter expect to gamble more in the future than in the past. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Two fifths have gambled in a casino in the two moths before this study. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>12% are Bingo fans. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social Issues and Acceptability: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Nearly 2-in-3 think they know someone personally who has a gambling problem. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They awarded higher than average acceptability ratings to all of the new concepts tested. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Government Approval Ratings: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>For some reason they don’t think very much of how their government is controlling spending. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They are the only group to put gambling education, research and treatment, at the top of the list of where funding should go. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Very few in this group (7%) feel the private sector should have control of casinos. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Demographics: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They are mostly men, by a 58% to 42% spread. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The majority do not have degrees. </li></ul></ul>2008 National Gambling Report
  66. 66. CPGI: Key Differences <ul><li>Severe Problem Gamblers (4%): CPGI score of 8 or more points </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gambling Behaviour: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The majority are regular or professional gamblers. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Nine percent are lapsed gamblers. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>All but 2% of them played the lotteries in the past year. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They include the highest percentage to buy scratch and instant win tickets. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>More than half have played in a casino in the early months of 2008. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>37% plan to gamble more, and they have no plans to budget. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social Issues and Acceptability: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Almost 3-in-4 personally know someone who they think has a gambling problem. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>By a large margin, over all other issues and among all segments, they see drug addiction as THE major issue, possibly reflecting personal awareness. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Although, they are highly concerned about gambling addictions in their provinces, they would favor raising more revenues through gambling over raising taxes. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They are more likely to fall into the “Gambling Benefits Economy” segment. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Compared to all segments except non-gamblers, severe problem gamblers rank all new forms of gambling low; they have already found their favorite gambling interest. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Government Approval Ratings: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Far more within this group feel gambling is a very serious issue and that government is not doing the job it should to deal with the resulting problems. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Yet they come in near the bottom in their support for gambling revenue to go to education, research and treatment of gambling addiction. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Demographics: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>There is a nearly equal split between males and females. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They are far more likely to have lower than average incomes ($40K or less). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They are more likely to have a low level of education. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>37% are young, under 34. </li></ul></ul>2008 National Gambling Report
  67. 67. CPGI Profile: Gambling Behaviour X1. In what year were you born? S3. Are you…? X2. What is the highest level of education that you have completed? X3. Which of the following best describes your current job status? X4. Was your total household income for 2005 under or over $60,000? And would that be? Region 57% 74% 4% 9% 5% 10% 20% 56% 80% 96% 97% 14% 12% 33% 36% 5% - At Risk Gamblers 78% 79% 76% - 66% Lotto 649 or Super 7 Lottery Games Played (Past 2 Months) 67% 61% 43% - 41% Scratch and Win or Instant Win lottery tickets 13% 12% 13% - 12% Charity or cause lottery tickets 3% 12% 7% - 7% Hospital lottery tickets 4% 7% 2% - 3% Sports lottery games 17% 14% 3% - 5% Other lottery games 4% 8% 9% 100% 21% Not in past 2 months 87% 82% 45% - 47% Participated in Past 12 Months Overall Participation Rates – Gambling Activities 77% 71% 29% - 34% Participated in Past 2 Months 98% 93% 92% - 81% Played Lotteries in Past 12 Months Overall Participation Rates – Lotteries 96% 92% 91% - 79% Played Lotteries in Past 2 Months 29% 38% 23% - 23% I like to gamble when the opportunity arises 9% 5% 11% - 9% I have gambled before but I don't anymore - - - 100% 13% I have never gambled Gambling Behaviour 39% 24% 10% - 11% Regular/Problem Gamblers 7% 9% 20% - 15% I only gamble when there are large jackpots involved   16% 24% 36% - 29% I only gamble on social occasions Severe Problem Gamblers Moderate Problem Gamblers Non- Problem Gamblers Non Gamblers Total    
  68. 68. CPGI Profile: Gambling Behaviour (continued) 2008 National Gambling Report 16% 27% 25% 12% - 16% Often 71% 7% 3% 7% 34% 60% 6% 71% 4% 1% 0% 3% 3% 4% 3% 7% 13% Non- Problem Gamblers 51% 42% 33% - 18% Gambled at a casino Gambling Activities Participated In (Past 2 Months) 8% 18% 12% - 7% Gambled on a private game 26% 19% 11% - 6% An electronic gaming machine outside of a casino 15% 12% 9% - 5% Played Bingo for money 5% 7% 7% - 3% Bet on the outcome of sports or other events 1% 6% 4% - 3% Called a broker or gone

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