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When Experimental and Computational Research Meet: The Participatory Extension Module v2.0
When Experimental and Computational Research Meet: The Participatory Extension Module v2.0
When Experimental and Computational Research Meet: The Participatory Extension Module v2.0
When Experimental and Computational Research Meet: The Participatory Extension Module v2.0
When Experimental and Computational Research Meet: The Participatory Extension Module v2.0
When Experimental and Computational Research Meet: The Participatory Extension Module v2.0
When Experimental and Computational Research Meet: The Participatory Extension Module v2.0
When Experimental and Computational Research Meet: The Participatory Extension Module v2.0
When Experimental and Computational Research Meet: The Participatory Extension Module v2.0
When Experimental and Computational Research Meet: The Participatory Extension Module v2.0
When Experimental and Computational Research Meet: The Participatory Extension Module v2.0
When Experimental and Computational Research Meet: The Participatory Extension Module v2.0
When Experimental and Computational Research Meet: The Participatory Extension Module v2.0
When Experimental and Computational Research Meet: The Participatory Extension Module v2.0
When Experimental and Computational Research Meet: The Participatory Extension Module v2.0
When Experimental and Computational Research Meet: The Participatory Extension Module v2.0
When Experimental and Computational Research Meet: The Participatory Extension Module v2.0
When Experimental and Computational Research Meet: The Participatory Extension Module v2.0
When Experimental and Computational Research Meet: The Participatory Extension Module v2.0
When Experimental and Computational Research Meet: The Participatory Extension Module v2.0
When Experimental and Computational Research Meet: The Participatory Extension Module v2.0
When Experimental and Computational Research Meet: The Participatory Extension Module v2.0
When Experimental and Computational Research Meet: The Participatory Extension Module v2.0
When Experimental and Computational Research Meet: The Participatory Extension Module v2.0
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When Experimental and Computational Research Meet: The Participatory Extension Module v2.0

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Abstract: Experimental and computational research is gaining more and more interest in the last decades in the field of social science and economics. Conducting laboratory experiments and incorporating heterogeneity within agent-based models help us get a better understanding of the analyzed phenomena and the micro-macro rules driving them by taking the human factor into account -- either directly or through stylized personal preferences.

Our contribution is a new tool called the Participatory Extension Module v2.0 which is intended to help scientists conducting mixed-method research (i.e., perform experimental research using existing agent-based models). It is an improved version of the original PET [1], a robust and generic web framework that allows modellers to extend their models to participatory simulations. It is a set of web applications that incorporates agent-based simulations into a web interface compatible with any of the major web browsers, enabling users to administrate, run and participate in simulations in a way that they are familiar with, applying the mechanisms and practices they use every day while browsing web-pages and using other web-based applications.

Applications of PET v2.0 may include online case studies for demonstrative and teaching purposes, or the conduct of lab experiments for behavioural studies of a model. The presentation includes a hands-on live demo of the features of the framework using a widely known model.

[1] Ivanyi, Marton, Rajmund Bocsi, Laszlo Gulyas, Vilmos Kozma and Richard
Legendi. "The multi-agent simulation suite." In Emergent Agents and
Socialities: Social and Organizational Aspects of Intelligence. Papers from
the 2007 AAAI Fall Symposium, pp. 57-64. 2007.

Published in: Technology, Economy & Finance
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  • Harmonized library, Game,policymaking model
  • Transcript

    • 1. WHEN EXPERIMENTALAND COMPUTATIONALRESEARCH MEET:THE PARTICIPATORY EXTENSION MODULE V2.0Richard O. Legendi, Tamás Máhr, László Gulyás,Rajmund Bocsi, Vilmos Kozma, Peter Rieger{rlegendi, tmahr, lgulyas, rbocsi, vkozma, prieger}@aitia.aiAITIA International, Inc.41st World Congress of the International Institute of Sociology (IIS)Social Interaction: Experimental and Computational Analysis9-10 June, 2013, Uppsala, Sweden, http://www.iisoc.org/iis2013The research leading to these results has received funding from theEuropean Union, Seventh Framework Programme FP7/2007-2013under grant agreement no. CRISIS-ICT-2011-288501.
    • 2. DEMO2013.06.10. 41st IIC World Congress, Social Interaction track 2
    • 3. The El Farol Bar Problem• Agents are researchers (N=100)• They visit a popular but small bar in Santa Fé• If attendance > 60   (overcrowded)• Who hasn’t come  • If attendance <= 60  • Who hasn’t come  • Each day agents decide individually and in the same timeW. Brian Arthur, “Inductive Reasoning and Bounded Rationality”, American Economic Review(Papers and Proceedings), 84,406–411, 1994.2013.06.10. 41st IIC World Congress, Social Interaction track 3
    • 4. The El Farol Bar Problem• MASON implementation of a NetLogo variant• Artifical agents:• ARMA-based prediction with history• Players have two actions: No go / go• If   +1 Score!• Goal: get max scoreRand, W. and Wilensky, U. (2007). NetLogo El Farol model. Center for Connected Learning andComputer-Based Modeling, Northwestern Institute on Complex Systems, NorthwesternUniversity, Evanston, IL. http://ccl.northwestern.edu/netlogo/models/ElFarol2013.06.10. 41st IIC World Congress, Social Interaction track 4
    • 5. Let’s play!http://demo1.aitia.ai/2013.06.10. 41st IIC World Congress, Social Interaction track 5
    • 6. 2013.06.10. 41st IIC World Congress, Social Interaction track 6Model ListCreateExperimentsAdditional Info
    • 7. Admin Page (Admins are subjects too)2013.06.10. 41st IIC World Congress, Social Interaction track 7Subject list(joined)Admin tools
    • 8. In-experiment Admin Page2013.06.10. 41st IIC World Congress, Social Interaction track 8Player status(moved/waiting)
    • 9. In-experiment Subject Page2013.06.10. 41st IIC World Congress, Social Interaction track 9Status messages
    • 10. Post-experiment Scores2013.06.10. 41st IIC World Congress, Social Interaction track 10
    • 11. Outline• Background• The CRISIS project• CRISIS Game• PET v2.0• Requirements• Future works2013.06.10. 41st IIC World Congress, Social Interaction track 11
    • 12. Background: The CRISIS Project“The CRISIS project addresses building a next generationmacroeconomic and financial system policymaking model:a bottom-up agent-based simulation that fully accounts for theheterogeneity of households, firms, and government actors. Themodel will incorporate the latest evidence from behavioraleconomics in portraying agent behavior, and the CRISIS teamwill also collect new data on agent decision making usingexperimental economics techniques. While any model mustmake simplifying assumptions about human behavior, theCRISIS model will be significantly more realistic in its portrayal ofrelevant agent behavior than the current generation ofpolicymaking models.”Crisis project description: https://www.crisis-economics.eu/2013.06.10. 41st IIC World Congress, Social Interaction track 12
    • 13. 2013.06.10. 41st IIC World Congress, Social Interaction track 13Web-based Game(Participatory Experiments)Economic Simulator(Cloud-Based ParameterSweep Execution)ModellingFrameworkModels
    • 14. CRISIS Game2013.06.10. 41st IIC World Congress, Social Interaction track 14(Planned design)http://game.crisis-economics.eu
    • 15. The Model Under the CRISIS Game2013.06.10. 41st IIC World Congress, Social Interaction track 15Source: Domenico Delli Gatti, personal communications(Single player mode)Gatti, Domenico Delli, Saul Desiderio, Edoardo Gaffeo, Pasquale Cirillo, and Mauro Gallegati.Macroeconomics from the Bottom-up. 1st ed. Springer, 2011.
    • 16. Architecture2013.06.10. 41st IIC World Congress, Social Interaction track 16
    • 17. PET v2.0• Idea came from AITIAs PET Software• Participatory Extension• Generalized components behind the CRISIS Game• Modern, scalable infrastructure• Previous version is 5+ years old• Components may run on (several) different machines• Software already available for any experiment2013.06.10. 41st IIC World Congress, Social Interaction track 17
    • 18. PET v2.0• Can be used:• Locally• Laboratory experiments• Policy makers (scenario analysis with a proper model)• On any webserver to run constantly• Gather data (scores from model and all user actions  replay)• Dissemination• Questionnaire module• Verify if subjects understood the rules• Software is already in use by Universiteit van Amsterdam2013.06.10. 41st IIC World Congress, Social Interaction track 18
    • 19. REQUIREMENTS?2013.06.10. 41st IIC World Congress, Social Interaction track 19
    • 20. What is required to use?1. An ABM model• PET is a generic framework• Currently Java and MASON models are supported2013.06.10. 41st IIC World Congress, Social Interaction track 20
    • 21. What is required to use?1. An ABM model• PET is a generic framework• Currently Java and MASON models are supported2. Development of the web interface• No restriction on tools (HTML5, GWT, ...)• Communication to server by standardized tools (AJAX)• Config files to map incoming messages to model actions2013.06.10. 41st IIC World Congress, Social Interaction track 21
    • 22. Future Works• Tools to support front-end creation• JavaScript library (WIP)• User-friendly editor (flexible, easy to use)• UI, questionnaire• Tutorials, docs to be developed• Additional platforms• +Your ideas? 2013.06.10. 41st IIC World Congress, Social Interaction track 22
    • 23. Interested?• „A New Set of Tools Supporting Agent-Based EconomicModeling”, EPIA 2013 (under publication, ~Sept.)• Statistical and Behavioral Model Analysis Tools.• Hands-on workshop @ ESSA 20132013.06.10. 41st IIC World Congress, Social Interaction track 23
    • 24. THANK YOU!• Questions?• Will be available soon from http://iaws.aitia.ai/• Download the software:• http://www.crisis-economics.eu/software• Try the CRISIS Game• http://game.crisis-economics.eu• Take a look on the El Farol model:• http://github.com/rlegendi/mason-examplesRichard O. Legendirlegendi@aitia.aihttp://people.inf.elte.hu/legendi/June 10., 2013.2013.06.10. 41st IIC World Congress, Social Interaction track 24The research leading to these results has received funding from theEuropean Union, Seventh Framework Programme FP7/2007-2013under grant agreement no. CRISIS-ICT-2011-288501.

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