0
Collaboration &
Research Sharing Tools
What do they do, what do they mean for your career, and who’s
responsible?

Rebecca...
The Facebooks of Science?
• ResearchGate
• Academia.edu

• Mendeley
• VIVO
– Maybe the LinkedIn of science?
Too much social in your network?
• Limit emails & manage privacy using
ResearchGate:
http://screencast.com/t/vX7H8arTVh

•...
All of these tools can…
• Provide some information about when and
how your work is used by others
• Help you develop netwo...
Which is right for you?
• Academia.edu and/or ResearchGate if you want a
profile right now.
– Especially good for grad stu...
More about VIVO
• Data for your profile is vetted by you when
you do your FRPA, so no extra work
• Will eventually be a wa...
VIVO will look something like this:

https://scholars.duke.edu/
Why use services that share your
publications?
• Makes your publications more readily
available, which
– May increase thei...
But, in December 2013…
Avoid this by knowing…
• What publications you are allowed to share
• How you can legally & ethically share them

• And wh...
Copyright & author’s rights
• Copyright is yours at the moment you commit
something to writing.
• But typically, when you ...
So, what are your author’s rights?
• Check your author’s agreement if you still
have it.
• Check SHERPA/RoMEO for current ...
Share your work safely
• Choose an open access journal (Gold OA)
– Library fund to cover fees
http://ucblibraries.colorado...
Terminology
• Preprints
– Typically refers to a pre-peer-review draft

• Postprints
– Typically refers to a draft that has...
What if you post too much?
(This is not legal advice!)
• Probably nothing.
• But you might receive a takedown notice, and
...
Resources
• Shelly or Rebecca (Rebecca.kuglitsch@colorado.edu) are happy to
help with questions
• CU Library Open Access f...
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Collaboration & research sharing tools

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  • ResearchGateAcademia.edu-founded in 2008, principles of OA, registered in 1999 before .edu rules took effect. V. interested in altmetrics—not just how many times a paper is cited, but who is reading ti, what impact is it having, skip over credit gap, where one might publich important paper, but no cites for a couple years because it takes time to write the things that cite your paper. Crowd review & social review in addition to peer review. About 8 million visitors & 4.5 million users
  • ResearchGateAcademia.edu-founded in 2008, principles of OA, registered in 1999 before .edu rules took effect. V. interested in altmetrics—not just how many times a paper is cited, but who is reading ti, what impact is it having, skip over credit gap, where one might publich important paper, but no cites for a couple years because it takes time to write the things that cite your paper. Crowd review & social review in addition to peer review. About 8 million visitors & 4.5 million users
  • It will look something like this: https://scholars.duke.edu/
  • Transcript of "Collaboration & research sharing tools"

    1. 1. Collaboration & Research Sharing Tools What do they do, what do they mean for your career, and who’s responsible? Rebecca Kuglitsch Interdisciplinary Science Librarian CU Boulder 1/14/2013
    2. 2. The Facebooks of Science? • ResearchGate • Academia.edu • Mendeley • VIVO – Maybe the LinkedIn of science?
    3. 3. Too much social in your network? • Limit emails & manage privacy using ResearchGate: http://screencast.com/t/vX7H8arTVh • Limit emails & manage privacy using Academia.edu: http://screencast.com/t/7XuAfjZYDj2n
    4. 4. All of these tools can… • Provide some information about when and how your work is used by others • Help you develop networks of colleagues •Share content
    5. 5. Which is right for you? • Academia.edu and/or ResearchGate if you want a profile right now. – Especially good for grad students • Mendeley if you want a collaboration and citation tool, too. • VIVO & our institutional repository if you want the university to do the work – Still under development, but will be very low effort & high impact for faculty users.
    6. 6. More about VIVO • Data for your profile is vetted by you when you do your FRPA, so no extra work • Will eventually be a way to highlight your CV & publications • And will connect with our institutional repository and other open access sources
    7. 7. VIVO will look something like this: https://scholars.duke.edu/
    8. 8. Why use services that share your publications? • Makes your publications more readily available, which – May increase their citation rate – Makes them available to non-academics – Makes them available to scholars from institutions that may not be able to afford the publications
    9. 9. But, in December 2013…
    10. 10. Avoid this by knowing… • What publications you are allowed to share • How you can legally & ethically share them • And what might happen if you inadvertently share too much
    11. 11. Copyright & author’s rights • Copyright is yours at the moment you commit something to writing. • But typically, when you publish in a toll-access journal or write a book, you sign over your copyright to the publisher. • You wrote it. • But you can’t necessarily share it.
    12. 12. So, what are your author’s rights? • Check your author’s agreement if you still have it. • Check SHERPA/RoMEO for current default rights. – Watch a screencast demonstrating this • Check with your publisher.
    13. 13. Share your work safely • Choose an open access journal (Gold OA) – Library fund to cover fees http://ucblibraries.colorado.edu/scholarlycommunications/oa/oafund.htm • Self-archive (Green OA) – SPARC author addendum http://www.sparc.arl.org/resources/authors/addendum-2007 – Archive whatever you’re allowed to, however you’re allowed – SHERPA/RoMEO will help you figure this out
    14. 14. Terminology • Preprints – Typically refers to a pre-peer-review draft • Postprints – Typically refers to a draft that has been through peer review, but is often not the publisher’s PDF
    15. 15. What if you post too much? (This is not legal advice!) • Probably nothing. • But you might receive a takedown notice, and need to take your article down. • What if someone else distributes your work? • They might receive a takedown notice, and need to take your article down.
    16. 16. Resources • Shelly or Rebecca (Rebecca.kuglitsch@colorado.edu) are happy to help with questions • CU Library Open Access fund http://ucblibraries.colorado.edu/scholarlycommunications/oa/oafu nd.htm • SPARC author addendum http://www.sparc.arl.org/resources/authors/addendum-2007 • SHERPA/RoMEO http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo • How to look up a journal’s policy using SHERPA/RoMEO http://screencast.com/t/QJabx9xaFA • Set your privacy controls and limit email for Academia.edu http://screencast.com/t/7XuAfjZYDj2n • ResearchGate http://screencast.com/t/vX7H8arTVh
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