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Asian Longhorned Beetles
Asian Longhorned Beetles
Asian Longhorned Beetles
Asian Longhorned Beetles
Asian Longhorned Beetles
Asian Longhorned Beetles
Asian Longhorned Beetles
Asian Longhorned Beetles
Asian Longhorned Beetles
Asian Longhorned Beetles
Asian Longhorned Beetles
Asian Longhorned Beetles
Asian Longhorned Beetles
Asian Longhorned Beetles
Asian Longhorned Beetles
Asian Longhorned Beetles
Asian Longhorned Beetles
Asian Longhorned Beetles
Asian Longhorned Beetles
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Asian Longhorned Beetles

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  • 1. Photo by Sarah Beth Yoder – Boston University Washington News Service November 12, 2008 – Steven Lingafelter, research entomologist for the USDA’s Systematic Entomology Laboratory, examines an Asian Longhorned Beetle under a microscope in his lab at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C.
  • 2. Photo by Sarah Beth Yoder – Boston University Washington News Service November 12, 2008 – Steven Lingafelter, research entomologist for the USDA’s Systematic Entomology Laboratory, examines an Asian Longhorned Beetle under a microscope in his lab at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C.
  • 3. Photo by Sarah Beth Yoder – Boston University Washington News Service November 12, 2008 – A display case at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. shows the differences between the male and female Asian Longhorned Beetles.
  • 4. Photo courtesy of the USDA’s Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit Frass, digested, fecal material left behind Asian Longhorned Beetles bore into wood
  • 5. Photo Courtesy of the USDA’s Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit Asian Longhorned Beetle pupal case
  • 6. Photo courtesy of the USDA’s Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit Asian Lonhorned Beetle larva in the quarantine lab for the USDA’s Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit in Delaware
  • 7. Photo courtesy of the USDA’s Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit Asian Longhorned Beetle larvae inside the quarantine lab for the USDA’s Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit in Delaware
  • 8. Photo courtes of the USDA’s Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit Asian Longhorned Beetle larvae inside the quarantine lab for the USDA’s Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit in Delaware
  • 9. Photo courtesy of the USDA’s Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit Asian Lonhorned Beetle adult in pupal chamber in the quarantine lab for the USDA’s Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit in Delaware
  • 10. Photo courtesy of the USDA’s Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit Beetle exits wood, leaving behind dime-sized exhit holes
  • 11. Photo by Sarah Beth Yoder – Boston University Washington News Service November 14, 2008 - Michael Smith, research entomologist for the USDA’s Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit, and Ellen Aparicio, biological science lab technician for the unit examine a portion of a tree that used to be infested with Asian Longhorned Beetles at the USDA facility in Delaware.
  • 12. Photo courtesy of the USDA’s Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit Wooden Logs inside the the USDA Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit’s insectary
  • 13. Photo by Sarah Beth Yoder – Boston University Washington News Service November 14, 2008 - Michael Smith, research entomologist for the USDA’s Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit, and Ellen Aparicio, biological science lab technician for the USDA’s Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit, survey logs infested with potential native parasites in the insectary at the USDA facility in Newark, Delaware.
  • 14. Photo courtesy of the USDA's Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit Jeff Wildonger, a lab technician for the USDA's Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit, examines an Asian longhorned beetle in the quarantine lab.
  • 15. Jeff Wildonger, a lab technician for the USDA's Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit, examines an Asian longhorned beetle in the quarantine lab. Photo courtesy of the USDA’s Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit
  • 16. Photo courtesy of the USDA's Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit Asian Longhorn Beetle cages in the quarantine lab for the USDA's Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit in Delaware.
  • 17. Photo courtesy of the USDA’s Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit Experiments with the Asian Longhorned Beetle inside the quarantine lab for the USDA’s Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit in Delaware.
  • 18. Photo courtesy of the USDA's Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit Jeff Wildonger, a lab technician for the USDA's Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit, examines a parasite in the quarantine lab.
  • 19. Photo courtesy of the USDA’s Beneficial Insect Introduction Research Unit A probing parasite

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