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                                  Skills Sheet
 Stereotypes in the News




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Stereotypesinthenews

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Stereotypesinthenews

  1. 1. classroom ® Skills Sheet Stereotypes in the News Uses: Copy machines, opaque projector or transparency master for overhead projector. PARADE magazine grants permission to reproduce this page for use of classrooms. Copyright © 2007 Advance Magazine Publications Inc. All Rights Reserved. Intolerance is often the failure to see a person as an individual. People who commit hate crimes rarely know their victims. They see only a stereotype, not a unique individual. Stereotypes are opinions that are based on fixed ideas, not actual facts. When we decide something about a person based on how they look, where they come from, the color of their skin, their sexual orientation, their religion or other single factors, we are stereotyping. The “dumb blonde” and the “dumb jock” are stereotypes that are unfair to blondes and athletes. Can you recognize stereotypes? Read the letters to the editor and opinion columns in your paper for a week or more. Do any of them overgeneralize or stereotype people or topics in the news? Look at advertisements in the paper as well. Do any of them stereotype? What ideas do they promote about different types of people? Do you find any stereotypes on the comics pages? Use the questions below to help you evaluate what you see. Person or group being depicted: How is the person or group shown or described? What traits are being attributed to this person or group? Is this fair? What are the facts? Extra Credit: Write a letter to the editor criticizing a stereotype you see in a letter, an opinion column, or an advertisement.

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