P A R IP A R I
SS
W I N T E R I M 2 0 0 3
P A R IP A R I
SS
W I N T E R I M 2 0 0 3
Theatrical Analysis
Sylvia: 1876 Louise Merante a current production of John Num...
Sylvia: 1876 Louise Merante a current production of John Numerer.
In going to the ballet entitled “Sylvia”; I,
essentially...
we’d see in the states) and adults, gathered
around, talked amongst each other: some
dressed in jeans and a sweater – some...
evoked a sense of splendor - very classy; the
dancers seemingly floated above the stage to
the sounds of the orchestra. Th...
“ Someone who’ll watch over me” Frank McGuiness
At the beginning, even before the play
started - as we sat ourselves, the ...
months pass from the first capture, when the
third character, a British man Michael
entered the set. He was unconscious, a...
which we will never know. Edward walks
out of the cell - free of the chains and
shackles - and the lights darken. The play...
P A R IP A R I
SS
W I N T E R I M 2 0 0 3
The Mansard Roof: Its Origin
an invention, or a product of François Nicolas
Mansart – a young French Architect. Yet, actually
research shows favorably ...
Although François Mansart worked
significantly with the Mansard Roof, he was
also notable for many hotels and chateaus,
sh...
Although the Mansard Roof
was “invented” by François
Mansart – no direct evidence
is found to support an exact
date, when ...
Later in the late 1800’s, in the time of
the exhibitions of Paris – the notion of
the Mansard Roof was furthered
significa...
The approach that
Francois Mansart often
times used simply
wrapped the roof down the
vertical elements of the
attic space ...
virtually invisible hipped roof is employed. The structural rafters of the
Mansard Roof are therefore discontinuous; their...
The Mansard Roof can be punctuated by
numerous types of dormer windows:
rectangular, pointed, gabled, round and
sometimes ...
reflect the birth of the
Mansard Roof to be equated
with Francois Mansart. As
Francois Mansart was born
in and was a life-...
Sources Cited…
http://www.charlestownpreservation.org/archistory8.htm
http://www.rchsonline.org/ar_mans.htm
http://www.ren...
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Paris: UW- Milwaukee: SARUP Winterim 2003

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Paris: UW- Milwaukee: SARUP Winterim 2003

  1. 1. P A R IP A R I SS W I N T E R I M 2 0 0 3
  2. 2. P A R IP A R I SS W I N T E R I M 2 0 0 3 Theatrical Analysis Sylvia: 1876 Louise Merante a current production of John Numerer “ Someone who’ll watch over me” Frank McGuiness
  3. 3. Sylvia: 1876 Louise Merante a current production of John Numerer. In going to the ballet entitled “Sylvia”; I, essentially, was going into the ballet “blindfolded” and stripped of the gift of memory as I have never seen nor read the performance before, along with the fact that I am not well-versed in ballet period. I can enjoy them-but have no knowledge or training in how to “analyze” and truly enjoy-with that said. Once inside-the Opera Bastille was an incredible space-modern elements, yet sheik. Modernity juxtaposed to rich history. Although the theatre itself does not “bellow” out history - the knowledge of what the national opera represents and what it has represented for many decades denotes a strong history. The seats we had were, probably according to many people, horrible, yet they were actually satisfying – the furthest up one could go. The seats we had were, probably according to many people, horrible, yet they were actually satisfying – the furthest up one could go. This warranted and afforded an incredibly unique view/vantage point. From these seats, one could hear the bang of the drum, the whisper of the flute, the charm of the triangle, the romantic melancholy of the violins and the deepness in pitch of the cello - all as though we were sitting right there right next to the orchestra pit. Although when one walked through the front door of the Opera Bastille and greeted the ticket- taker in French – “Bonjour”, then stumbled with quite minimal French to our seats - with the brief aid of an usher. We are in Paris; the notion of being in Paris was certainly lost or temporarily sidetracked. The idea of language as a universality seemingly took over. One would have no indication of being in Paris - simply by watching the people. The people, consisting of kids (acting like “normal” kids
  4. 4. we’d see in the states) and adults, gathered around, talked amongst each other: some dressed in jeans and a sweater – some dressed in suit and tie. American/French it just didn’t seem to matter - we were all there together to witness a performance - a universal language: ballet. The ballet starts -it starts with a character whom I believe to be the god of love: taking on the appearance of Thyrsis - a mere shepherd wandering into the woods falling asleep but once the other dancers/characters came into the picture -I was unable to discern the characters. In the entire first half of the performance I struggled to identify who was who - who was important to whom and what relationships were flourishing. The only dancer who I could keep track of was the character in the red costume. By such a strikingly different ensemble compared to what all others were wearing - was the only way. I feel that the red was an allegory for something – perhaps love, whereby one could see and identify love all throughout. But as an untrained eye, red may have “symbolized” a totally different message. The first half was strong as far as dancing, music (which was extraordinary and resonated incredibly throughout), the lighting and set work. The second half, while continuing the excellent dancing, sound, music and setwork - the set was much more vivid in the second half. The set in the first was to be a forest, with indication of trees in a forest. The second has defining walls creating a much more effective space - with this in mind, the lighting seemingly was much crisper in the second half – with crispness in shadows met by starkness of light. The second half consists of two parts: the first being an elegant ballroom atmosphere - the costumes were long red; full dresses accompanied by black-tie tuxedos. The ballroom set with the costumes
  5. 5. evoked a sense of splendor - very classy; the dancers seemingly floated above the stage to the sounds of the orchestra. The second part was back in the forest. Although the music was incredible and perfect it was as though it wasn’t there which in my opinion is a compliment, as it elegantly complimented the dancing without over playing. Again, the element of language was not an issue - as it is the universal language of ballet - and no language is spoken just conveyed through dance, I would have had a difficult time figuring out what was happening and why, even if it were on an “American” stage. The closest thing to a full, or rather a partial understanding of the play/ballet was when I read the synopsis of the play. I don’t know, due to, again my inexperience, naivety to the notion of ballet. Still I am unsure of what is happening when I “play” the ballet through my head, while reading the synopsis interchangeably - regarding who is who, what is what and what is meant to be the story. Here is the official synopsis – hopefully it is a bit more poetic and serves justice well. Synopsis Part one: Diana’s sacred wood The god of Love descends into the wood and takes on the appearance of Thyrsis a mere shepherd. Aminta, a real shepherd, enters the sacred wood secretly hoping to find Sylvia, Diana’s nymph. Diana and the nymph-huntresses appear in the wood to take a rest from hunting and to bathe. Sylvia and Aminta meet. Diana and the huntresses discover the tender exchanges betweenthe shepherd and the nymph. Taken by surprisse, Sylvia betrays Aminta. Left alone, Diana remembers handsome Endymion doomed to eternal sleep. At daybreak, the shepherds, their curiosity fired, enter the sacred wood and find Endymion asleep. Lover Thyrsis is with them. Aminta’s heaart is roken. He is obsessed by the vision of Sylvia. Love feels sorry for Aminta. But he takes on the form of handsome Orion in order to seduce Sylvia. She lets herself be led on by him. Part two: First Scene: Love/Orions’s party Sylvia becomes aware of her femininity. She discovers pleasure. Her sensuality aflame, Sylvia is overwhelmed by the memory of Diana and Aminta. Second scene: Winter May years later, Aminta returns to the sacred wood. Sylvia too returns to the sacred wood. They meet. Their love seems to live again for an instant. Diana observes them. She is tempted to separate them, but Love disarms her. In the end it is life itself that steals Sylvia away from Aminta. As for Diana, she remains alone, the eternal huntress.
  6. 6. “ Someone who’ll watch over me” Frank McGuiness At the beginning, even before the play started - as we sat ourselves, the stage set was all dark, yet a figure was present on the stage; at this time I wasn’t certain as to whether the figure was real or imaginary-as any movement was discernable. It seemed to be a small stage that was not kept up very well; not a good initial opinion – or so I thought. Not until the first lights came on was when I realized that the set was intentionally dingy - as it was representing a prison cell The opening of the play introduces two characters; an Irishman Edward and an American Adam who were merely “Beirut, Lebanon, the mid 1980’s. An Englishman, an Irishman and an American are being held hostage in a cell. Why? And how will they survive their unseen capture and the boredom “The Bloody Boredom!” And each other… They turn to their own integrity, wit and faith in life. The conflict and the humour, but above all the courage of their struggle for physical and mental survival are beautifully conveyed in this play.” passing the time exercising –doing push-ups and stretches. The two characters while having badly aimed hostility at each other came to become friends and confidents -each supporting the other in this perilous time. The other is constantly preventing the other from going “insane” and breaking down (as they individually and collectively)- as that is what their Lebanese captors wanted. They managed to do so by again redirecting their angers through stories, memories and recounts of their lives and most of all – through humor. They knew it was important to concentrate their efforts on each other maintaining a memory of how long they’ve been away at the same time maintaining the desperate hope of eventual release. The denotion of time, the elapse of time was signified by pure darkness coming back to the identical set; each time months seem to pass. Approximately four
  7. 7. months pass from the first capture, when the third character, a British man Michael entered the set. He was unconscious, asleep while the other two just talked to him, rather at him, trying to gain his attention. When, eventually, the Britain awoke -he was confused/disoriented, saying he was merely going to the market for food, as he was having his students over for dinner. He came to this country Lebanon to teach English -he was afraid at first, but felt the risk was not too bad. (I’m certain that lying in a cell - chained to a wall - changed that opinion). Now it was time for the two “veterans” to take care of the newcomer -not letting him break down. They do so by holding him from the door so he won’t scream or cry out. They force him to laugh, not cry. “Laugh” they say - he tries but cannot. They don’t give up -they start cracking up, laughing hysterically, loudly - he finally mustered up a laugh - not quite convincing at first, but gets better. Now, the dialogue of stories, recounts, reminiscing of the past continues - each making fun of the other and visa versa. Taking turns “2 on 1” and “1 on 2”. Occasionally, throughout the play, as the time frames advance - faint Lebanese music could be heard through the speakers. This really sets up the mood as the audience members could almost put themselves there - with them. As the time continues to elapse - Christmas time comes - not nearly exacting the time frame, which has passed - they sing Christmas songs – joyous, yet somber all in one. More time elapses, the set goes dark - more lights come on - and there are only two characters - the American they fear, has been murdered. Michael, the British and Edward the Irishman now come to grips that they, too, may not go home; this hit Edward really hard so he’d spent much time many months - trying to convince Adam that they would all go home - had he been fooling himself too? He was awestruck - he would not eat the food that he was served. Michael, the British, was consoling Edward, while embracing
  8. 8. which we will never know. Edward walks out of the cell - free of the chains and shackles - and the lights darken. The play ends. The play is appropriately titled, “Someone Who’ll Watch Over Me” - as one had the other to look over and to be looked over upon Then the third was looked over by the first two - and the two were looked over by the third - in a sense of what was happening “out there” “were there any mention of us”. Tragically the play ended when - no longer - was another able to watch over the last inmate - we can only assume that someone was indeed looking over Michael and that he managed to leave unharmed. him trying to offer hope, even in the time of gloom. He finally was successful – Edward found the inner strength to go on – he, eventually, ate his food. They continued intimate conversation - and kept the time passing and kept hope further alive that one day soon they would be able to return to normalcy. The play ended by Edward getting dressed in his clothes in which he was captured; pants, shirt and tie - with shoes, but no socks. As he was getting dressed, Michael was trying to be supportive and wishing Edward luck and so on, while certainly, on the inside he was now thinking of his own fate - The play was actually based on true events; it evoked a quite powerful “patriotic” feeling - putting you emotionally in each character, empathizing what each other must be going through. The political overtones were right on the money and gave me personally more insight of what was happening halfway around the globe; all of the doom that we didn’t hear about on CNN, the behind the scenery – so to speak.
  9. 9. P A R IP A R I SS W I N T E R I M 2 0 0 3 The Mansard Roof: Its Origin
  10. 10. an invention, or a product of François Nicolas Mansart – a young French Architect. Yet, actually research shows favorably that François Mansart did not actually devise its concept; he merely utilized it and furthered its existence by incorporating such roofs into many of his works. The name of the “Mansard Roof” seemingly came to be by virtue of being acquainted with François Mansart’s name – slightly altered. François Mansart was born in Paris on 13 January 1598; he was the son of a master carpenter – he was trained by his father and by a sculptor and a mason both of whom were his relatives. François was never formally trained as an Architect – yet he was eventually recognized for his abilities by the mid 1620’s. The Mansard Roof is often thought to be a concept,
  11. 11. Although François Mansart worked significantly with the Mansard Roof, he was also notable for many hotels and chateaus, showing a “masterful massing of architectural volumes and plan solutions for irregular sites and precisely correct spacing, between openings and classical design elements” (http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Forum/1327/0923focus.html) François Mansart was sometimes commissioned for entire structures, other times he merely added on to existing buildings. If he was not happy with the work – he tore it down and started over. He was often found to be a rather difficult personality type to work with and often worked without regard to cost. François Mansart is said to be the ‘cornerstone’ of French Baroque Classicism; he was best known for his work on Ste. Marie de la Visitation and the Orleans wing of the uncompleted Chateau of Blois. In the 1660’s he was asked to draw up plans for the East wing of the Palace of the Louvre – he never completed the drawings. He was later asked to draw plans for the Royal Chapel at the end of St. Denis – it was never built.
  12. 12. Although the Mansard Roof was “invented” by François Mansart – no direct evidence is found to support an exact date, when the Mansard roof was first employed. One could make the assertion, rather the assumption of its ‘birth date’; that assumption could be made to fall around that of approximately early- to-mid 17th century. Much later in the overall scheme of things, the Mansard Roof was a rather popular approach or facet of architecture throughout France. During the reign of Napoleon III – 1852-1870 – during France’s Second Empire, the Mansard Roof was seemingly topping every building being built.
  13. 13. Later in the late 1800’s, in the time of the exhibitions of Paris – the notion of the Mansard Roof was furthered significantly. The exhibitions of Paris of 1855 and 1867 were very much an impetus for the deployment of the Mansard Roof to both England and the United States, as many architects were visiting Paris – specifically for the exhibitions. One of the most popular house styles in America during the years immediately following the exhibitions of Paris – was one coined the “Mansard Style”. This “Mansard Style” was extensively used in: small cottages, simple farmhouses, along with massive mansions. Although the The roar of the crowd, seemingly, was silenced as the 19th century was nearing its end. The voice of the crowd was not distinctively heard again until the 1970’s, and today the voice of the crowd is once again heard loud and clear. Click on the image… structures’ framings were quite varied, with wooden members on the small cottages and small farmhouses and brick and stone for the mansions – the roof element was topped with the Mansard Roof. The proverbial “American Crowd” loved it. Not only was the Mansard Style “molded” into residential architecture, the Mansard Roof was also employed in both commercial and industrial application as well. “Mansardic Roof”? The resemblance can definitely be seen on modern building across the courtyard from the Dausminil Residence.
  14. 14. The approach that Francois Mansart often times used simply wrapped the roof down the vertical elements of the attic space – creating both: taller walls at the attic level, yielding more head room and a tax-free story, thereby reducing the tax burden on the owner. The Mansard Roof’s origins are said to be mainly two-fold: the primary reason the Mansard Roof was developed was to create more livable living space; the secondary factor is said to be a method of circumvention of a long standing Paris tax on the overall height of a building. This height was determined from the grade level up to where the roof eave starts.
  15. 15. virtually invisible hipped roof is employed. The structural rafters of the Mansard Roof are therefore discontinuous; their overall shape takes on that of an elbow, which fits onto or above the structure like a “hat”. Whereby the shape of the traditional roof’s rafters create an “A”. Due to this structural difference, the Mansard Roof type has also been called the “curb roof”. There are essentially four types of Mansard Roofs: straight, convex, concave or flared – with an occasional, but very rare “S” curve or bell cast. As the complexity of the shapes increases – so, too, does the overall cost. Regardless of the type, the slope can very extensively. Although the Mansard Roof was said to be an increase of livable space and a circumvention of a Paris tax, another impetus was that of a visual one; even a boring, boxy type house could be transformed into beauty by placing the “hat” of the Mansard Roof atop. The above Images were borrowed from http://www.realtor.org/rmomag.nsf/pages/arch33 Above image borrowed from http://www.mansard.org/ The slope of a Mansard Roof from its eaves to its ridge is broken into two portions. The lower portion is built with a steep pitch – almost vertical in nature, in many cases. The upper portion is pitched lowly and is nearly flat. Often times the utilization of a very shallow, This shallow roof can be seen in the above photo Nearly every slope is covered with “shingles made of such varied materials as clay or slate tiles, corrugated sheets of steel, aluminum, lead, (http://www.renovationexperts.com/roofing/roofhistory.asp) copper, or zinc”.
  16. 16. The Mansard Roof can be punctuated by numerous types of dormer windows: rectangular, pointed, gabled, round and sometimes with a double row of dormer windows altogether (seen in photo to right). Each window style carries with it a wide range of decorative motifs – each creating uniqueness in character. The Mansard Roof was, as previously noted, a method of transformation of many building typologies. The most common building type or typology that was refitted with the “hat” of the Mansard Roof, was the Italianate Style which began in the 1840’s – which overlapped the Mansardic or Second Empire in the 1860’s. Both the Mansardic and the Italianate Styles lost their popularity in the 1880’s. To identify a starting point or a place of origin of the Mansard Roof is just as difficult to do as it were to establish a precise age of such style. Without knowing the first specific roof type indicative of the Mansard Roof style – the whereabouts of such a roof can, too, only be assumed. Thus far the findings
  17. 17. reflect the birth of the Mansard Roof to be equated with Francois Mansart. As Francois Mansart was born in and was a life-long resident of Paris, the broad stretch of correlation could be cause to assume that the Mansard Roof was developed in Paris. The Mansard Roof was thought to be further implemented along the newly expanded Haussman boulevards under the leadership of Napoleon III – paralleling the expansion of Throughout the mid-to-late 19th century the Mansard Roof was well established throughout Paris and France’s countryside. Up to the time of the exhibitions of Paris, which occurred in 1855 and 1867, the notion of the Mansard Roof was completely within the “footprint” of France. Only after the exhibitions of Paris, did the Mansard Roof find itself stepping outside the perimeter of France; the Mansard Roof found itself topping buildings in both England and the United States – and even Canada.
  18. 18. Sources Cited… http://www.charlestownpreservation.org/archistory8.htm http://www.rchsonline.org/ar_mans.htm http://www.renovationexperts.com/roofing/roofhistory.asp http://www.bartleby.com/65/ma/mansardr.html http://www.bartleby.com/81/10959.html http://www.astro.uiuc.edu/~thompson/empire.html http://www.slider.com/enc/33000/mansard_roof.htm http://www.historiclandmarks.org/feature/feature1002.html http://www.rochestercityliving.com/neighborhoods/styles/neigharch.html http://www.realviews.com/homes/2nd.html http://www.realtor.org/rmomag.nsf/pages/arch33 http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Forum/1327/0923focus.html

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