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Table Setting
 

Table Setting

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Yr 9 Food Technology - Food for Special Occasions

Yr 9 Food Technology - Food for Special Occasions

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    Table Setting Table Setting Presentation Transcript

      • FOOD TECHNOLOGY
      • Table Setting & Decorations
      • 11 th November 2009
      • It is considered much more enjoyable to serve and eat food a pleasantly arranged table. The way in which food is served can vary according to the number of people being served, the space available, the type of food being eaten, and the type of occasion.
      • The amount of china (crockery) and cutlery on the table will depend upon the number of courses being served.
      • Informal occasions: Table settings are more casual and the aim is to allow people to enjoy each other’s company. These table settings are often used for morning/afternoon teas, family meals, casual dinner parties, barbeques and picnics
      • Buffets: Food, cutlery and plates are arranged on a table so that guests can serve themselves.
      • Formal occasions: Table settings are very well organised and coordinated. The table is arranged according to set rules.
    • Clothing tables and folding napkins
      • Table linen
      • As you are probably already aware, not all restaurants use tablecloths as part of their table setting. Some restaurants use plastic coverings, others have placemats or just the bare tables. These are determined by the type and theme of the restaurant.
    • Clothing tables and folding napkins
      • Clothing tables
      • Pictured is a method used widely in the industry.
      Hand Position. Place the table cloth over the end of the table releasing only the bottom finger grip.
    • Clothing tables and folding napkins
      • Clothing tables
      • Pictured is a method used widely in the industry.
      Pull the table cloth towards you releasing the cloth as you do.
    • Clothing tables and folding napkins
      • Clothing tables
      • Pictured is a method used widely in the industry.
      Pull the table cloth into the correct position.
    • Clothing tables and folding napkins
      • Napkin folding
      • The type of napkin folds to be presented is often determined by the establishment and the style of service. There are many napkin folds from which to choose. Some are very simple, such as the buffet fold.
    • Clothing tables and folding napkins
      • Napkin folding
      • Others, such as the Opera House or Open Rose, are more elaborate. Elaborate napkin folds are used to provide additional grandeur to a table setting, while simple folds are used more often when time is of the essence to diners and staff.
    • Clothing tables and folding napkins
      • Napkin folding
      • The simpler the fold the less handling. This can be an important consideration in terms of hygiene. Keep in mind that the napkin is going to be used by guests to wipe their hands or mouths during the meal. Therefore, any non-visible bacteria on napkins during folding will be transferred to the guests
    • Laying tables for service
      • Table setting
      • The table setting in any restaurant is determined by the style of cuisine it serves. This means that the type of food served will have a bearing on the type of cutlery used. In a Chinese or Japanese restaurant, for example, chopsticks are also provided as the food is generally cut into bite size pieces before cooking. However, forks are also provided to cater for guests who may not know how to use chopsticks.
    • Laying tables for service
      • Table setting
      • Table settings must always be set perfectly as it is at the table that guests relax and have their dining needs fulfilled. A carefully set table will give guests the impression service staff and management appreciate their business
    • Laying tables for service
      • Definition and types of covers
      • The word ‘cover’ in dining room terms refers to the place setting for one guest.
      • Most western style restaurants use one of two basic covers for their table setting. These are:
        • a la carte cover;
        • table d’hote or set menu cover.
    • Laying tables for service
      • A la carte cover
      • This cover is used for an a la carte menu which means a menu that has individually priced dishes.
    • Laying tables for service
      • A la carte cover consists of:
        • main knife and fork;
        • side plate;
        • side knife or small knife;
        • wine glass (usually a white wine glass is used as the customer is more likely to order a white wine for the first course);
        • napkin;
        • centre pieces e.g. cruets, tentcards, table numbers, bud vase and candlestick.
    • Laying tables for service
      • While restaurants vary this somewhat, the following is a guide to positioning the tableware for an a la carte cover:
        • centre the place setting using the seating as a guide (the centre position can be marked with a main plate or napkin);
        • main knife to the right and 1cm from the edge of the table, cutting edge facing toward the left;
        • main fork to the left and 1cm from the edge of the table;
    • Laying tables for service
      • While restaurants vary this somewhat, the following is a guide to positioning the tableware for an a la carte cover:
        • side plates to the left side of main fork;
        • side knife on the right side of side plate, parallel to main fork and knife (cutting edge of side knife facing towards the left edge of table);
        • wine glass placed directly above the main knife.
    • Laying tables for service
      • Table d’hote or set menu cover
      • When table d’hote menus are used for banquets or functions, the table d’hote or set menu cover for setting tables is also used. When setting this type of cover, you will need to know the dishes on the menu as the cutlery requirements for each of the courses are included in the cover setting.
      • Below is a diagram showing the setting for a menu consisting of soup, fish, main course and dessert.
    • Laying tables for service
      • Table d’hote or set menu cover
    • Laying tables for service
      • Table d’hote or set menu cover
      • The tableware for this menu cover includes:
        • soup spoon;
        • fish knife and fork or entree knife and fork;
        • main course knife and fork;
        • entree fork and spoon for dessert (variations exist);
        • side plate;
        • side knife or small knife;
        • wine glasses;
        • napkin;
        • centre pieces.
    • Laying tables for service
      • Table d’hote or set menu cover
      • Always put the first course cutlery on the outermost end so that guests can work inwards with their cutlery through the courses. As this type of cover generally takes up room, the dessert cutlery is placed above the main plate setting and centred across the top of the cover.
    • Activity
      • In groups of four
      • Use the cutlery, crockery and glasses to lay a neat table setting. Place all equipment in the correct order.
    • Activity
      • As individuals complete the following worksheet.
      • On the sheet in front of you there are a number of guidelines for table manners. State whether they are true or false.