Warm – Up <ul><li>Is flammability a physical or chemical property? Why? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Chemical property because bu...
3-5 Organizing Elements <ul><li>Objectives </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Describe  how Medeleev arranged the elements in his table...
Why do we classify/organize? <ul><li>How are most library books classified? </li></ul><ul><li>Why is this classification u...
Searching For Order <ul><li>Until 1750, only 17 elements were known. </li></ul><ul><li>Most identified were metals. </li><...
John Newlands <ul><li>1 st  & 8 th  elements, 2 nd  & 9 th   had similar properties, and so on.  </li></ul><ul><li>Law of ...
Mendeleev’s Periodic Table <ul><li>In 1860, he used solitaire to help him organize the known 63 elements </li></ul><ul><ul...
Questions <ul><li>What does periodic mean? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Occurring at regular intervals. </li></ul></ul>
Mendeleev’s Predictions <ul><li>He couldn’t complete his table because of gaps in the elements. </li></ul><ul><li>Those el...
Other Systems <ul><li>In 1829, Dobereiner proposed a law of triads. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>It is a group of 3 similar eleme...
Evidence for Mendeleev’s Table <ul><li>He named missing elements after the same group. </li></ul><ul><li>I.E. Element belo...
 
Questions <ul><li>How was Mendeleev’s table organized? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Elements are arranged in order of increasing ...
<ul><li>http://education.jlab.org/elementflashcards </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.webelements.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>http:/...
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3-5 Organizing The Elements

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3-5 Organizing The Elements

  1. 1. Warm – Up <ul><li>Is flammability a physical or chemical property? Why? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Chemical property because burning a substance is combining with oxygen and creating a new substance </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What happens to the composition of matter during a physical change? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The substance does not change only shape or some other physical change takes place. </li></ul></ul>
  2. 2. 3-5 Organizing Elements <ul><li>Objectives </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Describe how Medeleev arranged the elements in his table. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Explain how the predictions helped verify the usefulness of his periodic table. </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Why do we classify/organize? <ul><li>How are most library books classified? </li></ul><ul><li>Why is this classification useful? </li></ul><ul><li>How do Biologist classify living organisms? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Domain, Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Genus, Species. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Why do we classify/organize? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Easier to find and identify. </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Searching For Order <ul><li>Until 1750, only 17 elements were known. </li></ul><ul><li>Most identified were metals. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1789, Lavoisier grouped atoms into 4 types. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Metals, nonmetals, gases and earths. </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. John Newlands <ul><li>1 st & 8 th elements, 2 nd & 9 th had similar properties, and so on. </li></ul><ul><li>Law of octaves </li></ul><ul><li>Organized the first 14 “known” elements. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pattern stopped </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Mendeleev’s Periodic Table <ul><li>In 1860, he used solitaire to help him organize the known 63 elements </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Wrote element on a card </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Looked at the elements properties. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lined the cards up in increasing mass. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>He saw a pattern that repeated. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rearranged to create columns of similar properties. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Properties repeat from row to row. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Questions <ul><li>What does periodic mean? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Occurring at regular intervals. </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Mendeleev’s Predictions <ul><li>He couldn’t complete his table because of gaps in the elements. </li></ul><ul><li>Those elements had not been discovered. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Other Systems <ul><li>In 1829, Dobereiner proposed a law of triads. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>It is a group of 3 similar elements. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The middle element has properties between the other two. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Example </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Li – 6.941 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Na – 22.990 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>K – 39.098 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Average (6.941+39.098)/2 = 23.02 </li></ul></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Evidence for Mendeleev’s Table <ul><li>He named missing elements after the same group. </li></ul><ul><li>I.E. Element below Al, he named eka-aluminum. </li></ul><ul><li>He predicted it would be a soft metal with low melting point and a density of 5.9 g/cm 3 . </li></ul><ul><li>French chemists actually discovered it in 1875. </li></ul><ul><li>Gallium (Ga) is a soft metal with 29.7 o C M.P. and a density of 5.91 g/cm 3 . </li></ul>
  11. 12. Questions <ul><li>How was Mendeleev’s table organized? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Elements are arranged in order of increasing mass. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>How do the properties repeat? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Row to row. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>New columns are created for each set of similar properties </li></ul></ul>
  12. 13. <ul><li>http://education.jlab.org/elementflashcards </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.webelements.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://pearl1.lanl.gov/periodic/ </li></ul>

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