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Tools and Techniques to design and deliver effective training to mix of culturally diverse students

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Big challenge trainers face in this in global and multi-country environment is to cater to needs and learning styles of students of different cultures, regions and societies attending same training ...

Big challenge trainers face in this in global and multi-country environment is to cater to needs and learning styles of students of different cultures, regions and societies attending same training course. Culture has long been known to impact preferred learning styles of people of that community and assessing learning styles of students from different culture has always been a mystery for the global trainers. This training package is first step to resolve that mystery systematically through appropriate training design and equally planned training delivery.

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	Tools and Techniques to design and deliver effective training to mix of  culturally diverse students Tools and Techniques to design and deliver effective training to mix of culturally diverse students Presentation Transcript

  • Tools and Techniques to design and deliver effective training to mix of  culturally diverse students Raman K. Attri Jan 2010 1
  • Scope Big challenge trainers face in this in global and multi‐country g g f g y environment is to cater to needs and learning styles of students of different cultures, regions and societies attending same training course. Culture has long been known to impact preferred learning styles of people of that community and assessing learning styles of students from different culture has always been a mystery for the global trainers. This training package is first step to resolve that mystery systematically through appropriate t i i th h i t training d i design and equally planned t i i d ll l d training delivery.© Raman K. Attri 2010 2
  • For further inquiries and advices to implement these techniques  and strategies in this presentation‐ contact the author.  g p© Raman K. Attri 2010 3
  • Learning Styles in context of Technical Training Learning Styles in context of Technical Training Kolb’s Learning Style Most scientific and  M t  i tifi   d  validated learning style  inventory by Kolb. Applicable to  experiential learning  Applicable largely in  performance based  training, technical  training(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 4
  • Proven recipe to design and deliver training for culturally  diverse students in same training class diverse students in same training class 1. Use simple tools to assess “generic” learning styles  of students instantly in a class 2. U   Use research guidelines on learning styles preferred  h  id li    l i   l   f d  by different regions, cultures and societies 3 Use 4MAT ISD system to hardwire training material  3. catering to all the student mix of 4 learning styles 4. Use key instructional guidelines to adapt the  discussions and engage culturally diverse students© Raman K. Attri 2010 5
  • 2 Crucial Gaps that can hamper the effective delivery of  p p y an “active” training  Different Learning Style Preferences of different students in the class Different cultural background of different students in the class Different Different Cultural Learning Styles Backgrounds(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 6
  • Question: Different cultures’ learning preferences  are different. That’s in theory. but how do we  know learning style of our culturally diverse  students in same class? Understand Learning style mix in a class and adapt training  delivery to cater to culturally diverse students 1. Use simple and instant tools to assess “generic” learning styles of  students in a class 2. Use research guidelines on learning styles preferred by different  U   h  id li    l i   t l   f d b  diff t  regions, cultures and societies 3. Use 4MAT ISD and instructional guidelines to adapt the discussions  and engage culturally diverse students(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 7
  • “True instruction begins when instructors understand their students”  True instruction begins when instructors understand their students   (Felder and Brent ) (C) Raman K . Attri 2010 8
  • How to find preferred learning styles of student mix in a  H    fi d  f d l i   l   f  d   i  i     training class?(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 9
  • Instant Learning Style survey questionnaire Instant Learning Style survey questionnaire Honey Mumfard Learning Style Survey:  Honey‐Mumfard Learning Style Survey:  http://www.brianmac.co.uk/learnstyle.ht m Can be used by trainer in the classroom on Day 1 for instantly profiling learning styles of his students Felder‐Soloman Index of Learning Style:  http://www.engr.ncsu.edu/learningstyles/ilsweb. html(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 10
  • Instant Learning Style survey questionnaire Instant Learning Style survey questionnaire Generic Kolb Learning Style Survey (for indications only) http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/st yles/learn_style_survey.html l /l l h l Can be used by trainer in the classroom on Day 1 for instantly profiling learning styles of his students y(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 11
  • What are learning characteristics of different learning styles  Wh    l i   h i i   f diff  l i   l   (how students of different learning styles prefer to learn)?(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 12
  • Learning Styles developed upon Kolb’s learning style  inventory Having an experience Putting their theory Reflecting on it into practice Drawing their own conclusions Our emotional response — learn by thinking or feeling. Our approach to a task — learn by doing or watching(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 13
  • Learning Styles developed upon Kolb’s learning style  inventory Having an experienceDYNAMIC LEARNERS INNOVATIVE LEARNERS ACTIVIST REFLECTOR ACCOMODATOR DIVERGER Putting their theory Reflecting on it into practice CONVERGER ASSIMILATOR PRAGMATIST THEORIST COMMON SENSE ANALYTIC LEARNERS Drawing their own conclusions Our emotional response — learn by thinking or feeling. Our approach to a task — learn by doing or watching(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 14
  • Learning Styles developed upon Kolb’s learning style  inventory Atleast two of the four dimensions are associated with each learner‐ How he will perceive a new  experience and how he will process that experience.  Ways to grasp or perceive a new experience: W i i 1. Concrete Experience (feeling): corresponds to "knowledge by acquaintance", direct practical experience or  "apprehension" in Kolbs terms.  People with this preference are open to new experiences, depend on people  contact for gathering information, are intuitive and make feeling based judgments 2. Abstract Conceptualization (thinking):  corresponds to "knowledge about" something, which is theoretical, but  perhaps more comprehensive hence "Comprehension". People with this preference are logical and analytical in  their approach to a learning situation and seek theories and generalizations either through gaining new   information by thinking, analyzing, or planning (abstract conceptualization ‐ thinking) or  through experiencing  the concrete, tangible, felt qualities of the world (concrete experience‐ feeling). The combination of these two  choices produces a preferred learning style. Ways to transform or process a new experience: (HOW WE LEARN) 1. Reflective Observation (Watching):  concentrates on what the experience means to the experiencer. People with  this preference watch and observe all sides of an issue in order to understand its meaning and take time to act. 2. Active Experimentation (Doing): transforms the theory of abstract Conceptualization by testing it in practice. Those  who prefer Active Experimentation like to try things out, are more willing to take risks and are practical and  who prefer Active Experimentation like to try things out are more willing to take risks and are practical and application oriented. We internally choose our approach to  learning the task by opting for either  though watching others  involved in the experience and reflecting on what happens (reflective observation ‐ watching)  or   through jumping straight in and just doing it (active experimentation ‐ doing). © Raman K. Attri 2010 15
  • Combined Kolb Learning Cycle Representation Combined Kolb Learning Cycle Representation(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 16
  • Active student participation encompasses the learning processes of active experimentation and reflective observation. “Active” signifies that students do something in class beyond simply listening and watching watching, e.g., discussing, questioning, arguing, brainstorming, or reflecting. ‐ Richard M. Felder & Linda K. Silverman(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 17
  • Learning Characteristics of each learning style Learning Characteristics of each learning style(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 18
  • How to find general Learning styles of students from different  geographic regions and societies?(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 19
  • Culture typologies and impact on learning preferences Culture typologies and impact on learning preferences Low context vs high context cultures Shame vs guilt cultures  M‐Type vs O‐Type cultures Interdependent‐self vs independent‐self cultures Collectivist vs individualist cultures Strong and weak Uncertainty avoidance cultures Field‐dependent vs field independent cultures(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 20
  • Research #1: Learning Style and Cultural relationship Research #1: Learning Style and Cultural relationship  Yamazaki   acknowledgmen nts) Courtesy: Yoshitaka  (see (C) Raman K . Attri 2010 21
  • Research #1: Learning Style and Cultural relationship Research #1: Learning Style and Cultural relationship Courtesy: Yoshitaka Yamazaki  (see acknowledggments) C(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 22
  • Research #2: Learning styles of various geographies and  cultures wledgements) Courtesy Simy Joy & David A. y Kolb (see acknow C K(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 23
  • Research #2: Learning styles of various geographies and  cultures wledgements) Courtesy Simy Joy & David A. y Kolb (see acknow C K(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 24
  • Research #3: Intelligence types and cultural association Research #3: Intelligence types and cultural association(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 25
  • How to adapt teaching and instructional methods to engage  culturally diverse students?(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 26
  • Key Question: Knowledge about Learning styles is  okay, but how do we deliver training effectively to  k  b  h  d    d li   i i   ff i l     build proficiencies in students of different styles  in the same class? Create training material and instructional instruments to cater to WHY,  g , WHAT, HOW and IF learning styles:‐ 1. Using Generic Kolb Learning Style Inventory guidelines 2. Using researched techniques on teaching different learning styles g q g ff g y(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 27
  • During training, the ideal is that the instruction will address all of the students learning styles. However, the majority of schools and adult training programs rely mainly on lecture and question and answer methods which appeals to the Type 2 learner the Assimilator Dr Bernice McCarthy sums up the situation by learner, Assimilator. Dr. saying, "The other three learning types either cope and adapt, or they fail. Spending energy adapting and coping, while admittedly a kind of learning, diffuses energy needed for other learning." Focusing on one learning type also places an additional burden on the student who has English as a second language. That individual must cope with the stress of learning in another language, as well as experiencing different cultural norms and customs. So, keep this in mind if you are delivering a training program in English to International students either here in the U.S. or in other countries ‐ Dr. Bernice McCarthy (C) Raman K . Attri 2010 28
  • 4MAT system of ISD design for different learning styles 4MAT system of ISD design for different learning styles "Imaginative Learner" demands asks "If" this is to know "Why" he orcorrect how can she should be I modify it to involved in thismake it work for activity. me wants to know wants to know "How" to apply How "What" to learn What the learning Bernice McCarthy, 4MAT copyrighted, 2009 About Learning, Inc(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 29
  • “For the trainer a major task is to "chase" the learner round the cycle, asking questions which encourage Reflection, Conceptualization and ways of testing the ideas. The Concrete Experience itself may or may not occur in the training session”(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 30
  • Generic guidelines on training delivery using Experiential  Learning styles Learning styles(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 31
  • Generic guidelines on training delivery using Experiential  Learning styles Learning styles(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 32
  • Generic guidelines on training delivery using Experiential  Learning styles Learning styles(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 33
  • Generic guidelines on training delivery using Experiential  Learning styles Learning styles(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 34
  • Generic guidelines on training delivery using Experiential  Learning styles Learning styles(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 35
  • Teaching techniques for different learning styles from  research teer skill Courtesy: National volunt centre, Australia(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 36
  • Other Learning styles and corresponding teaching styles Other Learning styles and corresponding teaching styles  Courtesy: Nrichard M. Felder (see acknowledgments)(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 37
  • . . . . But I have students with different learning  styles in same class, how do I cater to individual  l  i     l  h  d  I     i di id l  needs?(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 38
  • Key Question: Knowing learning styles and  adapt g t a adapting training delivery for different learning  g de e y fo d ffe e t ea g styles is okay, but is there any systematic ISD  tool  to design training catering to diverse learning  style at first place? l    fi   l ? Hardwire training material to cater  learning styles of culturally  diverse students 4MAT ISD system MAT ISD (C) Raman K . Attri 2010 39
  • 4MAT 8‐Step ISD and facilitation BKM : Optimize training  catering to all 4 learning styles catering to all 4 learning styles www.aboutlearning.com Enable learners to Engagement internalize the new knowledge and skills Teach how to put new Meat and information knowledge i practice k l d in ti to b ild knowledge t build k l d(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 40
  • 4MAT 8‐Step ISD and facilitation BKM : Optimize training  catering to all 4 learning styles catering to all 4 learning styles www.aboutlearning.com Enable learners to Engagement internalize the new knowledge and skills Teach how to put new Meat and information knowledge i practice k l d in ti to b ild knowledge t build k l d(C) Raman K . Attri 2010 41
  • Acknowledgements and References Acknowledgements and References LSI surveys Honey‐Mumfard Learning Style Survey: http://www.brianmac.co.uk/learnstyle.htm Felder‐Soloman Index of Learning Style: http://www.engr.ncsu.edu/learningstyles/ilsweb.html Generic Kolb Learning Style Survey : http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/styles/learn_style_survey.html Resources:   Learning Styles and Typologies of cultural differences ‐ Yoshitaka Yamazaki,  http://weatherhead.case.edu/academics/departments/organizational‐behavior/research/workingPapers/WP‐02‐1.pdf Are There Cultural Differences in Learning Style? Simy Joy & David A. Kolb  based on 1292 respondents from Kolb LSI.,  http://www.sgs.utoronto.ca/Assets/SGS+Digital+Assets/current/ELWS/Joy+and+Kolb$!2c+Cultural+Differences+in+L h l d lb l l ff earning+Style.pdf Impact of Culture on learning‐ Natalie Richter  (Workshop and video), http://www.yorku.ca/cst/workshops/2007‐ 08/workshop071106.html House, R. J., Hanges, P. J., Javidan, M., Dorfman, P. W., Gupta, V. (2004). Culture, Leadership and Organizations: The  GLOBE Study of 62 Societies. Sage Publications, Inc.  Bernice McCarthy, 4MAT ISD systsem, About Learning, Inc Competency Based Training Design, National Volunteer Skill Centre Australia 2003,,  http://www.volunteeringaustralia.org/files/R3Q9Y0OQY0/Revised%20Writers%20Guide%202.pdf Learning and Teaching styles in Engineering education, Richard M. Felder, Engr. Education, 78(7), 674–681 (1988)],  g g y g g , , g , 7 (7), 74 ( 9 )], http://www4.ncsu.edu/unity/lockers/users/f/felder/public/Papers/LS‐1988.pdf© Raman K. Attri 2010 42
  • About the author Author is Global Learning and Training Consultant specializing in the area of performance technology. He has worked extensively in proficiency based training, advanced instructional design, learning design, systems engineering techniques and management models. He has professional, research and management experience for over 17 years. He holds MBA in Operations Management, Executive years Management MBA, Master degree in Technology and Bachelor degree in Technology with specialization in Electronics and Communication Engineering. He has earned numerous international certification awards ‐ Certified Management Consultant (MSI USA/ MRA USA), Certified Six Sigma Black Belt (ER USA), Certified Quality Director (ACI USA), Certified Engineering Manager (SME USA), Certified Project Director (IAPPM USA), to name a few. In addition to this, he has 60+ educational qualifications, credentials and certifications in his name. Raman K. Attri Global Learning Consultant and Performance Based Training Specialist Contact: +44 20 7979 1979 E‐mail: rkattri@rediffmail.com Website: http://sites.google.com/site/ramankumarattri LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/rkattri/ Other Publications: http://www.,slideshare.net/rkattri/ All rights reserved. Copyright © 2010 Raman K. Attri. No part of this document can be reproduced or used or  copied without permission of author.  Respective references belongs to cited authors. © Raman K. Attri 2010