Indian appareal research (Bangalore)
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Indian appareal research (Bangalore)

on

  • 226 views

How global brands interpret in Indian context

How global brands interpret in Indian context

Statistics

Views

Total Views
226
Views on SlideShare
154
Embed Views
72

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
9
Comments
0

5 Embeds 72

https://www.behance.net 50
http://rahulkarankal.prosite.com 16
https://prosite.com 3
http://www.slideee.com 2
http://www.behance.net 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Indian appareal research (Bangalore) Presentation Transcript

  • 1. HOW GLOBAL BRAND INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT BY RAHUL KARANKAL RETAIL EXPERIENCE DESIGNER NID BANGALORE SPONSOR: GENSLER
  • 2. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/1 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT I'd like to take this opportunity to thank all of the people who have helped me directly or indirectly during the course of this diploma project. I'm highly indebted to Design Director (Gensler) Diwakar Chintella and Regional Head (Gensler) Smita Gupta for their guidance, constant supervision and critique as well as for providing necessary information regarding the project and in the design process. It'll be tough finding a similar design environment to work in. My sincere thanks to the project academic guide, Mr. CS Susanth, for his timely inputs and insights that proved invaluable in implementing this project. It was a pleasure working with the Retail Research , UX teams at Gensler Bangalore . Thank you guys! I would like to express my gratitude to my sponsor,Gensler Bangalore, for providing me with a platform to undertake this project and in the process, working with an amazing set of people, professionally and personally. A big thanks to all my friends, notably Mayank Chauhan, both the Niramayee, Gurpreet, Roshan, Rahul B, Swadha, Upamanyu, Shashidhar, Manish & Anupam for their constant encouragement, discussions and reminders. And finally, I'm grateful for the immense support and encouragement given by my family without whom this project wouldn't have been possible.
  • 3. 2 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE
  • 4. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/3 Indian Retail Market Sector................................................................. Why Consumer Pick Global Brand..................................................... Global Consumer Segments................................................................ Technology & Trends............................................................................. UNIQLO................................................................................................... ZARA........................................................................................................ FABINDIA................................................................................................ United Colors of Benetton................................................................. Abercrombie and Fitch........................................................................ Local Language Interpretation.......................................................... Grid For Store Front............................................................................. Mannequin Display.............................................................................. Arch ( Inspire Local Culture).............................................................. 81 84 88 91 99 105 109 117 118 120 122 124 128 Industry Sponsor................................................................................... Brief.......................................................................................................... NID........................................................................................................... Brain Storm............................................................................................ Design Methodology............................................................................ Culture in India...................................................................................... History of Indian Clothing.................................................................. Apparel in Bangalore............................................................................ Organized Market Sector..................................................................... Unorganized Market Sector................................................................ Typology In Bangalore.......................................................................... Front Facade........................................................................................... Sale........................................................................................................... Window Display..................................................................................... Bangalore Demography....................................................................... Consumer Survey.................................................................................. Consumer Conception of Brand........................................................ CONTENTS INTRODUCTION SECONDARY RESEARCH INSIGHTS UNDERSTANDING 21 PRIMARY RESEARCH 35 77 DESIGN FRAMEWORK 137 DESIGN DIRECTION 119 BRAND PROMOTION 113 CASE STUDY 97 7901 09 11 13 15 19 23 25 29 29 33 37 39 51 61 67 69 71
  • 5. 4 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE
  • 6. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/5 WHAT IS A GLOBAL BRAND? A global brand is simply a brand that is sold and marketed consistently around the world Brand name known everywhere. A global brand has the advantage of economies of scale in terms of production, recognition, and packaging. A global brand is one that has transcended its culture origins to develop strong relationship with consumers across different countries and culture. GLOBAL BRANDS
  • 7. 6 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE Retail experience is based on the brand, retailer and consumers. Brand name creates a base and sells more products. For example, Coca Cola is one of the top brands in the world and sells products worldwide, creating more market value for its products. Without such a strong brand name, no one would buy this product on such a large scale. Another example is of Walmart. Walmart sells a very wide variety of products, all under one roof. Brand differentiate products (Ex. Cameras, cars, software etc) and give premium placement (example, Rolls Royce, Lamborghini, etc) Retailers generally make a structure for the brand to ensure that the store fits within the brand's image. They create a project sale and ensure that customers come back for more. Consumers give the brand feedback about their needs and what could be improved about the product. A brand can modify it's products to suit the consumer's needs and make more sales by giving the consumers what they want. A brand which is attentive to it's consumer's needs builds up a good brand image and ultimately becomes more popular. RETAIL CYCLE
  • 8. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/7 Above Chart shows retail types & Influential factors surrounding the Brand, Consumer & Retailers. INITIAL PROCESS BRAND RETAILER CONSUMER Supply chain Retail Display Value Product Packaging Store Ambience Price Income Attitude E - Commerce Past experience Life StyleFamily Personality Technology Selling Advertisement Promotion
  • 9. 8 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE
  • 10. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/9 As architects, designers, planners and consultants, we work with our clients on some 3,000+ projects every year. These projects can be as small as a wine label or as large as a new urban district. With more than 3,500 professionals networks across 44 locations, we serve our clients as trusted advisors, combining localized expertise with global perspective wherever new opportunities arise. Our work reflects an enduring commitment to stainability and the belief that design is one of the most powerful strategic tools for securing lasting competitive advantage. RETAIL Lifestyle choices and aspirations drive the retail sector, whether it's a store, a lifestyle center or an urban retail district. The language of retailing is experiential, speaking to people's desire for self-expression, for community, for authenticity, for connection. Gensler plans, designs and implements the full range of retail from store design and rollout to retail architecture. We also provide brand development and merchandising design everything from the customer experience to the logos, labels and packaging.
  • 11. 10 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE ABSTRACT What, specifically, I like to learn or prove? (What causes the need for localization in global world? ) By investigating principles of corporate strategy as well as psychology/consumer behavior, we seek to better understand why some retail brands thrive in New global markets, while others effort flat. We propose to present our findings in a series of external webinars co hosted with the National Retail Federation. (NRF) What methods and Research processes we use? We will collect and analyze - through a design. Which target audience will be most interested in the findings, and why? (Select all that apply) Client/End users : retailer will gain learned from brands that have already expanded Developer: Developers in global market will gain that aid leasing strategies. Practitioners: Advisors to the retail industry will understand how to help their clients to expand. Other: National Retail Federation members will have access to educational webinars. We have observed that even in this era of extreme personalization, customized and localized retailers are very successful with the global roll- out of a store prototype that is essentially the same in each new market. While other retailers are very specific about their desire to localize each store as they expand outside the U.S. many other retailers fall somewhere in between, maintaining strong brand standards,while ensuring that global/local culture and customer unique desires and aspirations are acknowledged. These facts raised the questions: What is the trigger point for each brand? What cues we look for that will help retailers understand when its appropriate to stay consistent globally,or when its imperative to localize and evolve? While there is much existing data/ research about global consumers (which we'd like to collect and analyze more thoroughly) we have not been able to find any research that specifically addressed the trigger points between global prototypes and localization.
  • 12. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/11 HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT Analyze currently available knowledge and set the context for a potential future research effort. Develop expert knowledge of a specific design, business, competitive or market issue. Identify and understand the influential or important driving forces that have an impact on possible future events or directions that will affect our clients’ business or our business. Develop processes, design tools, and frameworks that can be used by designers and/or clients for innovation in design & delivery. BRIEF KEY WORDS • Bangalore apparel retail market. • Typology in Bangalore. • Global brand enter in India. • Brand Introduction. • Brand Promotion.
  • 13. 12 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE
  • 14. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/13 NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DESIGN (NID) The National Institute of Design (NID) is internationally acclaimed as one of the foremost multi-disciplinary institutions in the field of design education and research. The Business Week, USA has listed NID as one of the top 25 European & Asian programmes in the world. The institute functions as an autonomous body under the department of Industrial Policy & Promotion, Ministry of Commerce & Industry, Government of India. NID is recognized by the Dept. of Scientific & Industrial Research (DSIR) under Ministry of Science & Technology, Government of India, as a scientific and industrial design research organization. DESIGN FOR RETAIL EXPERIENCE The increasingly competitive market has transformed shopping from just purchasing products to an experience and an activity in itself. The programme has an integrated approach to designing products, systems and spaces for enriched consumer experiences. Students have inputs on visual merchandising, trends, materials, technology and techniques. The programme offers a challenge to redefine boundaries, understand consumer lifestyles and aspirations in order to visualize and create new concepts for an outstanding shopping experience. R&D CAMPUS,BANGALORE NID's R&D Campus at Bangalore was set up as a joint initiative of and funding from the Department of Industrial Policy and Promotion (DIPP), Ministry of Commerce and Industry and the Ministry of Information Technology, Government of India and was inaugurated in March 2006. R&D Campus commenced two research intensive PG Programmes namely Design for Retail Experience and Design for Digital Experience, from the academic year 2007-2008. From the academic year 2008-2009, the Campus has also commenced one more research intensive PG Programme, namely Information and Interface Design. NID's Research & Development Campus addresses the immediate need for an exclusive Design Research centre in the country, by fostering the creative design spirit and sighting new opportunities and frontiers through NID's design acumen nurtured over the four decades of intense teaching-learning process.
  • 15. 14 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE DISCLAIMER All contents included in this document as part of research and information collection process are intended to be used for purely inspirational/referential purposes to provide insights for the overall design development of the Diploma project. No copyright infringement is intended. This document is purely for academic purposes and the body work included here has not been shared with the client or for any other commercial purposes. ONLINE ARTICLES Due to the large amount of text collected from online articles and case-studies, in places experts have been created to provide the essence of the body of work. IMAGE The extensive image bank that was created during the course of this project at each stage has been covered as snapshots wherever necessary and relevant to the overall flow of this document. Since a large number of image have been used, the entire list of image sources has been included under the 'Image Credits' selection toward the end.
  • 16. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/15 The research started with brainstorming about the design process to be followed. The area of focus in the Indian market sector was also decided. After discussion the focus area selected was "Apparel market in Bangalore" BRAIN STORMING
  • 17. 16 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE
  • 18. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/17 The first step was to look at the Indian market from three different perspectives namely. TYPOLOGY It describes the different types of markets with respect to the urban context and the physical characteristics. MARKET SECTOR This provides the information about the global and the local market leaders across different sectors. AREA OF FOCUS Location, physical characteristics, brand, consumer demographics, consumer journey, e-retailing and service are the areas of focus.
  • 19. 18 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE CASE STUDY SURVEY TYPOLOGY IN BANGALORE GLOBAL & LOCAL APPAREL BRANDS UNDERSTANDING INDIAN CULTURE GLOBAL MARKET & CONSUMER PHOTO SURVEY ORGANIZED & UNORGANIZED RETAIL SURVEY CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHIC BRAND EXPERIENCE MAPPING LITERATURE STUDY LITERATURE STUDY CLOTHING HISTORY OF INDIA INDIAN RETAILER RETAIL MARKET IN INDIA DESIGN METHODOLOGY
  • 20. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/19 FRAMEWORKCONCEPTS OBSERVATIONOBSERVATION OBSERVATION CONSUMER BRAND PROMOTIONS DESIGN DIRECTIONS SALEFRONT FACADE WINDOW DISPLAY ONLINE SURVEY
  • 21. 20 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE
  • 22. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/21 UNDERSTANDING"To understand more about the Indian market various aspects were studied. The impact of Culture, Celebrations, Festivals, Bollywood and languages on the Indian market is also studied. Study about the history of Indian clothing helped in better understanding of current clothing styles across the country and the influence on the market.
  • 23. 22 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE ART FORM: RASA BOLLYWOOD CULTURE CELEBRATION FESTIVAL
  • 24. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/23 LANGUAGE BOLLYWOOD LANGUAGE
  • 25. 24 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE HISTORY OF INDIAN CLOTHING (-3000) India was the first place where cotton has grown, even as early as 2500 BC in the Harappan period. HARAPPANS (-2500) The harappans had one piece dresses. Men had something like a dhoti and women wore a kind of sari. VEDIC PERIOD (-1700 - -500) Around this time dress get modified. People started wearing 3 piece dress including under garment ARYANS (-1000 - -300) That time silk clothes were introduced. Rich women wore silk saree. Sewing considered inauspicious. BUDDHISM AND JAINISM(-500 - 00) People following these religions used to wear one piece cloths. MAURYA EMPIRE (-322 - -185) Men and women contin- ued wearing unstitched garments birth of Ghagra noticed in some places. STITCHING INTRO- DUCED(00 - 500) Stitches introduced in this period. God and goddess continued to be depicted in dress w/o stitches. KUSHAN DYNASTY (30 - 375) Kushans had five differ- ent kind of costumes for different people including soldiers and women. PERSIAN (300 - 500) Persian cap and dress introduced in India.
  • 26. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/25 KASHMIR (1947) Influenced by Hindu, Muslim, Afgans, Bud- dhists. Due to climate salwar became a common dress. Himachal Pradesh In 1947, Costumes evolved out of necessity owning extreme climate. MUGHALS (1526 - 1858) Purdahs, nose ring, kurta pajama, sherwani and salwar kameez came to India during this period for the upper body. HUMAYU (1556) He added Persian ele- ments for the upper body. AKBAR 1605 He introduced local texture. He also devel- oped a vocabulary of clothes and textiles. BRITISH AND OTHER FOREIGNER 1800 They brought many western style dresses in India including pant, shirt, jeans, top etc. GUPTA DYNASTY (350 - 70) Many forms of cut and sewn garments became fashionable. KANCHUKA AND GHAGRA (500 - 100) Stitched antariya evolved as ghagra & Kanchuka was a close fitted garment cov- ering the upper body. LUNGI (600 - 1100) Men started wearing lungi instead of dhoti. Sari drape changed from kaccha to dhoti style covering the upper body.
  • 27. 26 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE
  • 28. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/27 LUNGI Unlike dhotis, which are linear like sheets, lungis are sewn into a tubular shape like a skirt. They are especially worn in hot regions. There are also cheaper "open" lungis, in identical dimensions but not sewn into a tubular shape. They are normally woven from cotton and come in a variety of designs and colors. Silk lungis are available for ceremonial purposes such as weddings. The most common styles are either solid- colored or plain, reflecting the relative ease and cost-effectiveness of producing these patterns on a power loom. Blue is particularly popular, since it fades to pleasant tones in contrast to other colors. Regardless of the design or color, lungis are often lined at the top and bottom with a black/white stripe containing reinforced. DHOTI The name dhoti derives from Sanskrit dhauta. It is a rectangular piece of unstitched cloth, usually around 4.5 metres (15 ft.) long, wrapped around the waist and the legs and knotted at the waist, resembling a long skirt. The name dhoti derives from Sanskrit dhauta. [Citation needed]The garment has numerous other names such as, Dhot in Oriya, called Dhotiyu in Gujarati, Suriya in Assamese, Dhuti in Bengali, Dhoti or Kachche Panche in Kannada,‌Dhotar, Ango- star, Aad-neschey or Pudve in Konkani, Mundu in Malayalam, Dhoti or Pancha in Telugu, Dhotar or Pancha in Marathi, Laacha in Punjabi and "Mardaani" in cities of UP, Bihar, Terai, vEtti or vEshti in Tamil. Pancha (Singular) in Marathi is not Dhotar, both are different. While dhotar is worn around waist, Pancha is normally used to wipe(dab dry)water after bath/shower, similar to using Towel. Panche is plural. SARI The word sari is derived from Sanskrit which means 'strip of cloth' The most common style for sari to be wrapped around the waist, with the loose end of the drape to be worn over the shoulder, baring the midriff. However, the sari can be draped in several different styles, though some styles do require a sari of a particular length or form. The French cultural anthropologist and sari researcher Chantal Boulanger categorized sari drapes in the following families. Nivi, Bengali, Gujarati/Rajasthani, Maharashtrian/Konkani/Kashta, Madisar, Kodagu style, Gobbe Seere. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  • 29. 28 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE INDIAN RETAIL MARKET
  • 30. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/29 APPAREL IN BANGALORE Initially the research started first in the Bangalore retail market. There are various typologies (different types of retail formats )in Bangalore retail market and they were studied in detail. There were many areas around the retail segment like Location, physical charac- teristics, consumer influence and behavior. This project focusses on areas like store front, window display and brand introduction and information possibilities. Visiting some of the local and global retail stores and clicking photographs helped in understanding the organized and unorganized apparel market sector. The unique and influential factors observed during this process have been presented here.
  • 31. 30 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE
  • 32. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/31 Most of the clothing retail in Bangalore malls & high streets are organized. There are various store formats at play in these malls and high streets: stand alone stores, Boutiques, Flagship stores. Most of these Branded stores are Global brands & some of them are local franchise stores and Local branded stores. These stores in malls are organized because they have separate segments like store front, product/merchandise display, signages, branding etc. Each of them are given a lot of attention and direction. ORGANIZED CLOTHING RETAIL IN INDIA There are some branded company stores as well as local franchisee stores. Also one local franchise might run different brands. They provide better consumer experience for example car parking, store experience, air condition, cash wrap system, after sales service. Moreover the variety & clothing quality is also good.
  • 33. 32 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE
  • 34. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/33 The unorganized clothing retail in Bangalore includes shops and retail spaces which were cluttered and lack a uniform design language. For which they lack in design language they make up with unique identities, diverse selling points, vibrant introduction techniques. Each of these sellers have small quantity to sell. Even within these small quantities, there are various varieties. Hawkers (thelawala), small shops in old street, footpath shops, City market shops, small shops in public spaces are places where examples of unorganized clothing retail can be seen. Sometimes these individual merchants carry their merchandise with them. Most of the clothes are unbranded and are of low quality. Even some hawkers & shops sell duplicate brand clothes. These small shops lack space and some of them are temporary. For displaying the clothes they use available material & use street walls for displaying the products. ORGANIZED CLOTHING RETAIL IN INDIA
  • 35. 34 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE
  • 36. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/35 PRIMARY RESEARCH
  • 37. 36 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE MALL HIGH STREET After understanding organized and unorganized sector in the Apparel market, many types of retail market sectors emerged. Some of these types evolved and changed after development because of various factors like modernization, competition from foreign brands, etc. It was observed that High streets and new malls were the most preferred places of shopping among people. So, this research concentrates mostly on mall and street shopping in Bangalore. The research was done on the basis of location. After brainstorming and photo-surveys, the main areas of focus were the following 4 points -- 1. Front Facade 2. Sale 3. Window Displays 4. Events and Trends. All the above, can help in introducing and promoting a foreign brand in the Indian Market. This was done so that Gensler could also build a strong portfolio for its foreign clients and easily help them in introducing their products in the Indian market.
  • 38. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/37 FRONT FACADE SALE SEASON WINDOW DISPLAY EVENTS TYPOLOGY IN BANGALORE ( PRIMARY RESEARCH )
  • 39. 38 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE
  • 40. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/39 FRONT FACADE Front facade its easiest way to introduce brand . A good storefront will attract attention, provide effective display space, allow natural light into the retail space and contribute to the overall appearance of the down-town. A well-designed facade will work both within the aesthetic unity of the building and still reflect the individual character and personality of the business. In studying front facade, there was particular emphasis on studying store entry, signages and their position, color and material application and how all these factors can spaces. The goal is to give the brand a good visibility and focus on the brand's message. Local and global brand facades were studied and compared for research.
  • 41. 40 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE LOCAL Most of the shops are unorganized . Open displays, Bright colors and flat type face are the most common views in shops. Local shops also use English in addition to the local language. In the festival season, they display offers and also change the appearance of the front side of the store as suitable. Most of local stores are small in size. They use available furniture in market ( Plastic tables are commonly used for the cashier ) Shoppers can easily spot all mannequins displayed outside. The price and discount for unique things are shown in front facade, because most of the consumers are not brand conscious. They have strong emphasis on English after using the local language, as well as information about clothing. For Tag lines- they use both the local language and English. But price is the most important thing for selling cloth, which is why some shops show the price more prominently in front. Red color is the most common color for the front facade . BRIGADE ROAD
  • 42. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/41 GLOBAL Brigade road is one of the most crowded streets in Bangalore. All shops are connected to each other. Because of the small narrow footpath, it is difficult to see full front facade of shops. People can't see the brand name because all brand name & logo positions are displayed at the top of the store. For Brand naming, they use two languages in front of store - one local & other global. Most of the bikes & other vehicles are parked in front of the store, making it difficult to enter the store. Window display plays a major role in introducing new stocks & promoting brand. But there is no space for window display and no space even for parking. For shops where products are not displayed close to the entrance, the front facade glass helps in increasing visibility. Glass panel can even be used for sticking signs & messages for the brand . Most stores are stand alone, and they consist of ground floor plus a loft (Duplex) For front facade. They use colors depending on brand guideline, but a major difficulty is customizing the same typeface in local language .
  • 43. 42 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE LOCAL Hanging panels are used for brand name. Most of products are displayed outside in unbranded stores. Mannequin its most UNIQUE point of this observation . While the stores are not designed, the mannequins are highlighted prominently in their displays. The rest of the store is often cluttered, making it difficult for the consumers to see the products and decide what to buy. While the store itself is cluttered, the mannequin's human form, helps the consumers in making a choice Some mannequins are displayed on the street so that the consumers can touch the garments on display. This is also a strategy to attract the buyers. Size and proportions of mannequins are different based on the gender. In some cases, only half mannequins are displayed Price tags are displayed prominently on the mannequins. Most mannequins are easy to display and even dismantle. For some ethnic garments like Salwar Kameez, mannequins even replace racks or shelves in the store For naming the store, they use the merchandize (cloth) name and the emphasis is on English language. Store name is sometimes repeated in multiple places and languages for more emphasis. People always like to buy more variety based on color, so most of the shops customize their displays to showcase a wide range of colors and designs. COMMERCIAL STREET
  • 44. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/43 GLOBAL Commercial streets is a fully crowded place most of brand located here. All shops are narrow and tall . Even big global brands have to try and adjust in a very small space. Facade color helps in differentiating between two different shops. Most brands use their brand name in two places on the facade. Focus lights are used to emphasize the brand name. The facades of all stores are not always located at normal street level. Some shops are in the basement and some are on higher floors. They don't have space to introduce their brand through the front facade. When this happens, sometimes, more than 2 brands utilize the same facade space for their branding. In such cases, the consumers get confused about the stores location and entry points. There is not enough space for window displays. Sometimes, Easel stands, promotion props and boxes (of sales and offers) are used for promotion outside the store. Full glass panels are used for sticking brand name. In some cases, artwork and vinyl treatment on the glass is used to emphasize the brand and create a nice visual effect. Brand logo is also used on glass panels to promote the brand. Glass panels also make it easy for people outside, to see the clothes displayed inside.
  • 45. 44 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE LOCAL On the front facade local apparel sellers use hangers & ropes for hanging clothes. They also put mannequins outside so that the store space is utilized more effectively. Most of the local store hawkers use temporary material for displays. Flex is generally used for signage. Most brands use English language. The entry is open for most of the stores and there is no design language. Most of the times, the entire store is visible from outside. Here also, price tags are features prominently in the store displays. Some stores specifically target only men or only women. Some are for both men's and women's apparel. This distinction is promoted on the store's front facade. Some stores specially mention that they accept debit or credit cards on their front facade. Clothes which are hung outside or stacked in the display leads to a perception that they are more affordable. INDIRA NAGAR
  • 46. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/45 GLOBAL Presence of trees can also affect sales, since they reduce the visibility of the store and the display. Street lamps can be distracting. Images can be used to convey the brand's story and image effectively. They also help in attracting customers. A grid-like structure in the front facade helps in attracting attention towards the displayed apparel and entry points in a store. Most stores have front parking. Vinyl is used to decorate the front glass.
  • 47. 46 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE LOCAL For big stores, the store front attracts a huge crowd of people who keeps coming in and out of the store, because of this, the front facade is designed to be more spacious and open. Backlight is used for name fascia. In some cases, the front fascia and front facade seems to be disproportionate with respect to each other. Some stores use a similar design language for both local and English in their branding (for example, typography, color, etc.). While for others, the branding is completely different for different languages (for example, the English typeface is thicker and more prominent in the branding on the fascia). In one instance of innovation, a metal detector was also used as a sign board. Side walls of the store are used prominently for signages or promotion of the sale season. ORION MALL
  • 48. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/47 GLOBAL Most of the stores have limited vertical space in malls. In most stores, the entry is located on the left side or the center of the store. The front facade of the store also defines the boundary of the store. One thing which the stores have in common is a defined framework for different parts of the store facade. Most stores follow this framework for entry, window display, name fascia, etc. Some store fronts use a flat, store facade to communicate a more casual look, while other are more recessed. The general look and feel indicate the nature of the brand. In malls, stores use open security system. This gives a more welcoming feel. Even in malls, the brand's identity cannot be replicated effectively in the local language.
  • 49. 48 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE LOCAL People come to malls for different reasons. Some come to watch movies in attached multiplexes or just to spend time with their friends and family. Mall window displays are the best place to introduce a brand. Open, full glass facade is the most effective in increasing visibility of the store. Some shops introduce the brand name directly on the glass, instead of using a name fascia. But in these cases, the visibility of the brand is reduced. PHOENIX CITY MALL
  • 50. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/49 GLOBAL In case of the global brands they focus more on the brand name to attract more number of customers. As the brand name acts as a major crowd puller. Even the standard material is used so as to create a visual connect with the existing customers and hence creating a consistent brand experience. A lot of emphasis is given on the front facade.
  • 51. 50 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE
  • 52. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/51 SALE "I am brand conscious, but I cannot afford branded clothes if they are not on sale". A lot of people are brand conscious, but they only shop during sale season. Even people who don't follow fashion trends regularly likes branded clothes. Many people are influenced to buy more during sale season because of the 'small cost big brand' phenomenon. End of the season sales are also extremely popular for this very reason. "I went to watch a movie with my friends to the mall, and I saw a really nice Zara dress in the window display and went inside the shop to check it out. I actually ended up buying nine garments." Many impulse buyers get influenced because of window displays and even if they have not come to the store with the intention of buying clothes, they end up buying on an impulse. "I am originally from Malaysia, but I always buy foreign brands when I come to India, because the prices are cheaper in India". Many foreigners tend to buy big brands in India, because the cost of some branded clothes in Indian stores are lesser than some other countries.
  • 53. 52 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE FRONT FACADE (LOCAL) One of the local retail shops used the word "Sale" repeatedly everywhere in the shop to attract more customers. Many shops used stickers to promote the sale on walls, window displays and the shop's door. There was a lot of visual clutter, since no design language had been used. The shop was located at a prominent location on Brigade road in Bangalore, and hence it looks odd. Some shops on Commercial Street used bright colors to emphasize their stores. The colors were so bright that they over shadowed the adjacent shops Some shops has entry pylon sign to brand the shop. SALE
  • 54. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/53 FRONT FACADE (GLOBAL) People tend to buy larger quantity of clothes during sale season, since it is cheaper. Because of this, sale season is the most important time for the retailers, since they need to clear their entire stock and because people tend to buy more during this period. Most of the store owners change the whole format of the store during sale season. They make changes in the front facade, signages and merchandise display. The word "SALE" makes a big impact on the consumer's mind and attracts more customers. Some retail stores use easels for sale banners. In some stores, semi translucent vinyl is also used to communicate about the sale offers. Front facade is the most simple way to display sale. If the front facade is made of full sized glass panels or vinyl could be used to convey sale and discount offers. Small props are also used to convey sale season. Hoardings can also be changed according to the front facade to promote the sale.
  • 55. 54 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE SALE INTRODUCED THROUGH WINDOW DISPLAYS Window display is the easiest way to introduce Sale. Some retailers use a theme to decorate the window display. Most of the time, they display the tale tag on the tables or mannequins. Bright colors, generally red, are used in the merchandise display. It is generally challenging to convey a lot of information in small amount of time and space. The space is sometimes not enough to convey all the information about the brand, sale schemes and discount offers. Tag lines and catch phrases like "heavenly discounts" are also used to entice the customers. Shopping bags are sometimes branded specially for sale season. Even the bags emphasize the sale season or discount offers in the store. Sometimes stores make modifications in the window display height or space specially for sale season. SALE
  • 56. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/55 SALE DISPLAY AT DIFFERENT PLACES & SIZES International brands use different branding techniques in different places. It is important for them to plan and understand the impact of their window display design on sales before implementing it. Depending on different factors like store size, window space, etc they use different display designs in different stores. The central theme is common, but the actual window display is different in different stores. Some brands tend to break away from the monotony and use different and unique colors for promoting sales. By using unconventional colors, they make themselves unique and attract attention. This also makes them different from their competitors.
  • 57. 56 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE STRUCTURE & PROPS FOR SALE Suspended panels made from sun boards, MDF or vinyl are used to promote sale season. These are easily available, modular and can be easily dismantled. Stripped pattern is most commonly used for all windows. Some malls use MS free stand for displaying sale and discount offers in the entrance areas. Many stores use outdoor backlit pylon during sale season. It is flexible and easy to assemble. SALE
  • 58. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/57 MANNEQUIN USE AS A SALE PROMOTION Some brands use mannequins for introducing sale. A group of mannequins are kept in the entrance area to promote sale season. This is a new way of communication.
  • 59. 58 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE SIMILAR FIXTURES USED FOR DIFFERENT BRANDS Most of window displays employ wooden easel for displaying sale season. It is easy to port. On the same stand, one side can be used to communicate with the customers outside, and the other side can be used for communicating to customers inside the store. Stands can be used in malls or in window displays. One fixture can be used at different locations and by different brands.
  • 60. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/59
  • 61. 60 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE
  • 62. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/61 WINDOW DISPLAY
  • 63. 62 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE MALL SCENARIO LOCAL Local retailers are also getting influenced by fancy window displays used by international brands and they are trying to reconstruct the same kind of displays in their stores.
  • 64. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/63 GLOBAL Except mannequin in widow display people use poster. Global brand windows are minimal & most of brand windows are full close & semi close.
  • 65. 64 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE STREET WINDOW DISPLAY LOCAL Local shops also get inspired by International brands and try to display their products in innovative ways. They display many garments at a time and there is no well-thought theme behind it, they still try to use hangers for window displays. Sometimes, they make custom fixtures to arrange mannequins. Most mannequins are older models. There is no fixed position for displaying mannequins. In most cases, they try and use whatever space is available to them (like walls, staircases, railing, etc) using any material which is easily available to them.
  • 66. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/65 GLOBAL Global brands always follow the brand's guidelines and season's guidelines while designing the window display. Most window display design guidelines come from store's abroad and they are just replicated in India. The design is not location specific. It is sometimes difficult for them to display all products in the available space. Props are not fixed on the windows and light fixtures are not very flexible. The window height is a constraint, since the display always needs to be at a proper eye level. All these are some challenges that global brand stores face while setting up window displays. There are different varieties in the types of window displays, like completely closed backdrop display, semi closed and open window display etc. Most of the street shop window displays are semi closed and open window type displays. They offer better visibility of the store interior. Many window displays use mannequins and hoardings along with signage boards. They also use wall vinyl stickers. Now a days, white type face on the window is becoming very popular because of the clarity and visibility it offers. Most stores tend to hire local artists and vendors to change the signage and stickers.
  • 67. 66 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE
  • 68. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/67 BANGALORE DEMOGRAPHY
  • 69. 68 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE BAD EXPERIENCE OK EXPERIENCE GOOD EXPERIENCE People generally buy clothes after a month or three months. Some people buy clothes yearly. There are almost no weekly buyers for clothes, since clothes shopping is not like grocery shopping and people don't tend to buy clothes that often. CONSUMER SURVEY Most of the people prefer malls for shopping. They think that a mall gives them a good shopping experience with a 'wow' factor. People also buy online, but most users complain that their experience is not always good. 13% AFTER SIX MONTH 31% MONTHLY 37% AFTER THREE MONTH 15% YEARLY
  • 70. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/69 STORE EXPERIENCE 8% BRAND 13% DESIGN STYLE 23% MATERIAL FABRIC 25% FITTING 31% FIRST STEP OF MY PURCHASE Most people tend to visit the stores first, while others become acquainted with the brand through magazines. People also find out about brands through social networking sites or through friends. Many people tend to get influences by advertisements via TV, hoardings, websites, etc. 46 % STORE VISIT 18% FASHION & MAGAZINE 14% SOCIAL NETWORK 10% FRIENDS GUIDELINE 2%GOOGLE 2%T. V. 8%WEBSITE While buying clothes people generally give priority first to the fitting, then material and fabric, then design or style and lastly the brand.
  • 71. 70 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE CONSUMER'S CONCEPTION OF BRAND EXPERIENCE Here I understand how brand reach throw customers, we brainstorm what are the most important factors to make decision & Influence. Awareness (Post experience, Brand styles, trends, fashion, media flags, newspaper advertisements) start to think consumer & after surrounding experience (Friends, relatives, Article hoardings) educate the customer. They make choice & criteria (Price, Quality After sale service ) for him & after he evaluate the product. Store experience & other service experience, force to consumer to buy the product.
  • 72. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/71
  • 73. 72 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE HIGH STREET
  • 74. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/73
  • 75. 74 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE MALL
  • 76. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/75
  • 77. 76 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE 1 2 34 5 6
  • 78. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/77 INSIGHTS BRAND INTRODUCTION BRAND PERCEPTION Introduction of brand through events. Different front facade designs based on store size, location and space. Lack of customizing in local language for name fascia. Same fixtures used for different brands. Bulk selling. Mannequins inspire people as they relate to see the form to themselves and get a direct visual of how the garment would look on a person. 1 3 4 5 6 2
  • 79. 78 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE
  • 80. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/79 SECONDARY RESEARCH
  • 81. 80 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE 92% UNORGANIZED 8% ORGANIZED SOURCE: http://www.indiaretailing.com
  • 82. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/81 INDIAN RETAIL MARKET SECTOR Most populous democracy & over 1.2 billion people staying in India. But most of the people live in villages & very dense population staying in metro city. Indian retail market sector is 92% unorganized & 8% are organized. But most of the statistics are about total area of the Country. It includes small village areas, but in metro cities we can find there more organized Market sectors .
  • 83. 82 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE CLOTHING & FASHION BEAUTY & WELLNESS ORGANIZED 77% 88% UNORGANIZED
  • 84. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/83 FOOD & GROCERY 99% 96% 89% FURNITURE & FURNISHINGSELECTRONICS
  • 85. 84 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE The three dimensions of global brands quality signal, global myth, and social responsibility together explain roughly 64% of the variation in brand preferences worldwide. The percentages shown in the chart are the averages of survey responses from 12 countries. WHY CONSUMERS PICK GLOBAL BRANDS
  • 86. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/85 Source :Harward Business review
  • 87. 86 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE QUALITY SIGNAL Consumers watch the fierce battles that transnational companies wage over quality and are impressed by the victors. A focus-group participant in Russia told us: “The more people who buy [a] brand...The better quality it is.” A Spanish consumer agreed: “I like [global] brands because they usually offer more quality and better guarantees than other products.” That perception often serves as a rationale for global brands to charge premiums. Global brands “are expensive, but the price is reasonable when you think of the quality,” pointed out a Thai participant. Consumers also believe that transnational companies compete by trying to develop new products and breakthrough technologies faster than rivals. Global brands “are very dynamic, always upgrading themselves,” said an Indian. An Australian added that global brands “are more exciting because they come up with new products all the time, whereas you know what you’ll get with local ones.” That’s a significant shift. Until recently, people’s perceptions about quality for value and technological prowess were tied to the nations from which products originated. “Made in the USA” was once important; so were Japanese quality and Italian design in some industries. Increasingly, however, a company’s global stature indicates whether it excels on quality. We included measures for country-of-origin associations in our study as a basis for comparison and found that, while they are still important, they are only one-third as strong as the perceptions driven by a brand’s “Globalness.” GLOBAL MYTH Consumers look to global brands as symbols of cultural ideals. They use brands to create an imagined global identity that they share with like-minded people. Transnational companies therefore compete not only to offer the highest value products but also to deliver cultural myths with global appeal. "Global brand make us feel like citizens of the world and they somehow give us an identity," an Argentinean consumer observed. WHY CONSUMERS PICK GLOBAL BRANDS SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY People recognize that global companies wield extraordinary influence, both positive and negative, on society’s well- being. They expect firms to address social problems linked to what they sell and how they conduct business. In fact, consumers vote with their checkbooks if they feel that transnational companies aren’t acting as stewards of public health, worker rights, and the environment. As infamous cases have filled the air- waves Nestle's infant-formula sales in Africa since the 1980's, Union Carbide’s Bhopal gas tragedy in 1984, the Exxon Valdez spill in 1989, the outcry over Shell’s plan to sink its Brent Spar oil rig and the protests at its Nigerian facilities in 1995 people have become convinced that global brands have a special duty to tackle social issues. A German told us: “I still haven’t forgiven Shell for what they [did] with that oil rig.” An Australian argued: “Mc- Donald’s pays back locally, but it is their duty. They are making so much money, they should be giving back.
  • 88. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/87 That debate has cast a long shadow over American firms, and they have become rather circumspect about revealing their origins, culture, and values while doing business overseas. Many have tried to position themselves as more global than (ugly) American. However, we found that it simply didn’t Matter to consumers whether the global brands they bought were American. To be sure, many people said they cared. A French panelist called American brands “imperialistic threats that undermine French culture.” A German told us that Americans “want to impose their way on everybody.” But the rhetoric be- lied the reality. When we measured the extent to which consumers’ purchase decisions were influenced by products’ American roots, we discovered that the impact was negligible. That finding is all the more remarkable considering that when we conducted our survey, anti-American sentiment in many nations was rising because of the Iraq war. Most of the consumers were like the South African who candidly said, “I hate the country, but I love their products.” A Filipino confessed: “I used to go on anti- American rallies when I was a student, but I never thought about the [American] Brand of clothes or shoes I wore!” “We aren’t concerned with how America governs itself,” an Indian said. “What we look for is quality in their products.” Since people’s concerns with U.S. foreign policy have little impact on brand preferences, American companies should man-age brands just as rivals from other countries do. The playing field isn’t level; consumers don’t demand that local companies tackle global warming, but they expect multinational giants like BP and Shell to do so. Similarly, people may turn a blind eye when local companies take advantage of employees, but they won’t stand for transnational players like Nike and Polo adopting similar practices. Such expectations are as pronounced in developing countries like China and India as they are in developed countries in Europe. What we didn’t find was anti-American sentiment that colored judgments about U.S. based global brands. Since American companies dominate the international market, critics have charged that they run roughshod over indigenous cultures in other countries. Champions of free trade have countered that people in other nations want to partake of the great American dream, and global brands like Coke, McDonald’s, and Nike provide access to it. Source :Harward Business review
  • 89. 88 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE GLOBAL CITIZENS Fifty-five percent of respondents, on average, rely on the global success of a company as a signal of quality and Innovation. At the same time, they are concerned whether companies behave responsibly on issues like consumer health, the environment, and worker rights. According to study, the United States and the UK have relatively few global citizens, and Brazil, China, and Indonesia have relatively high numbers of them. Global Dreamers The second-largest segment, at 23%, consisted of consumers who are less discerning about, but more ardent in their admiration of, transnational companies. They see global brands as quality products and readily buy into the myths they author. They aren’t nearly as concerned with those companies’ social responsibilities as are the global citizens. Each country, consumers held a variety of views about global brands ANTIGLOBALS Thirteen percent of consumers are skeptical that transnational companies deliver higher quality goods. They dislike brands that preach American values and don’t trust global companies to behave responsibly. Their brand preferences indicate that they try to avoid doing business with transnational firms. The anti- globals’ numbers are relatively high in the UK and China and relatively low in Egypt and South Africa. GLOBAL AGNOSTICS Such consumers don’t base purchase decisions on a brand’s global at- tributes. Instead, they evaluate a global product by the same criteria they use to judge local brands and don’t regard its global nature as meriting special consideration. While global agnostics typically number around 8% of the population, there’s a higher percentage of them in the United States and South Africa and a relatively low percentage in Japan, Indonesia, China, and Turkey. GLOBAL CONSUMER SEGMENTS
  • 90. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/89 GLOBAL CITIZENS GLOBAL DREAMERS ANTI GLOBALS GLOBAL AGNOSTICS BRAZIL OVER ALL AVERAGE CHINA EGYPT FRANCE INDIA INDONESIA JAPAN POLAND SOUTH AFRICA TURKEY U.K. U.S. Source : Harward Business review
  • 91. 90 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE
  • 92. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/91 TECHNOLOGY & TRENDS
  • 93. 92 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE
  • 94. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/93 People are now consuming information from a growing range of multiple sources – jumping back and forth across the digital real-world divide in their quest to be entertained, to connect with one another and of course to buy. This shift away from linear, traditional consumption is creating the opportunity for a decentralised marketplace, where the possibility of purchasing can come from any angle. Around-the-clock shopping, buying from remote locations and purchasing from the pages of a magazine, menu, music video or TV show are happening now. The result? In the era of ‘Anywhere Retailing’, brands can no longer afford to expect consumers to come to them; they must go to the consumer, and learn to wrap the retail and brand experience around them. Source :Stylus Global research
  • 95. 94 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE MOBILE IS MANDATORY The most successful retail concepts emerging now and in the future will be those focused on mobile devices. From smart phones to portable devices that digitally transport consumers to virtual environments, systems, services, products and projects must be accessible on the go. Adopt mobile thinking now in order to connect with consumers, wherever they are. Seize the Moment. Successful anywhere retailing is based on connecting with consumers as the inspiration to purchase hits them – and then offering a direct route to sale, without pause. Whether shopping from blogs, TV, menus or ‘citizen-sellers’, explore how your products and services can be made accessible across multiple touch points and media, far beyond traditional retail. The aim is to maximise the point of initial seduction. Lose that moment, and risk losing the brand connection. SELL MORE THAN PRODUCT The fashion brands now selling fashion, backstage beauty looks and even show sound tracks direct from the catwalk can attest to the pulling power of selling ‘extras’. From shopping the hype to giving advice, brands should now consider themselves not merely as vendors, but as purveyors of an extended lifestyle proposition. MAKE IT INTERACTIVE In the digital era, successful brand thinking must be interactive. For brands, initiatives that trade on exchange boast positive audience perception and recoup a wealth of invaluable data to help understand consumers’ changing needs. For consumers, there’s an alluring sense of empowerment – choice, customizing and the capacity to have a voice amid the masses. Strive to Satisfy with Seamless Connections. Whether its apps that allow consumers to shop 24/7, or initiatives that bring the benefits of the virtual world into the physical retail journey, concepts that create a fluid, integrated and personalized shopping experience must be top of every brand’s agenda.
  • 96. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/95 SMART CLOTHES HANGERS, JAPAN Youth-oriented Japanese menswear label Vanquish has taken the humble, but iconic, clothing hanger and transformed it into a 21st- century, interactive selling tool. Designed by Tokyo-based multimedia tech agency Team Lab for the brand’s trendy Shibuya district store, the hangers contain RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) chips, which sense when a customer lifts the item of clothing from the rail. A signal then prompts a screen on the wall above the item to display product information, modelled images, accessory suggestions and alternative colors. Pushing interactive game-play to its limits, the hangers also have the ability to control the store’s lighting and music to complement the chosen item. They also double as a tracking tool, providing more accurate data on consumer behavior and product placement. Source :Stylus Global research
  • 97. 96 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE
  • 98. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/97 CASE STUDY UNIQLO GLOBAL BRAND ZARA GLOBAL BRAND IN INDIA FAB INDIA INDIAN BRAND
  • 99. 98 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE UNIQUE CLOTHING CASE STUDY 1
  • 100. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/99 BRAND NAME: UNIQLO TAG LINE: MADE FOR ALL Source :Fast retailing
  • 101. 100 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE HISTORY 1949 2008 2004 2009 2010 2011 2012 2005 2006 2007 Men's shop Oqori shoji is founded in Ube City, Yamaguchi Prefec- ture. UNIQLO establishes a joint venture with Wing Tai Retail Pte. Ltd.to expand in Singapore. UNIQLO Design studio (Currently The R&D Center) opened in New York. UNIQLO signs a design consult- ing contract for its products with Ms.Jil Sander, a world-renowned fashion designer. UNIQLO Shinsaibashi Store in Osaka opens as the first UNIQLO global flagship store in Japan. UNIQLO Daimaru Umeda Store opens as the first UNIQLO loca- tion in department store in the Osaka region. First UNIQLO store opened in San Francisco on the West Coast of the United States. First UNIQLO South Korean store opened in Seoul. UNIQLO begins its All- Product Recycling Initiative. First store opened in Ichikawa. UNIQLO opens the Kobe Harbor- land Store, a large-format store with over 3,300 square meters floor space.
  • 102. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/101 UNIQLO ACROSS THE GLOBE In 1984, Fast Retailing, headed by Tadashi Yanai, opened the first UNIQLO store in Hiroshima, Japan. Since UNIQLO first established an overseas presence in London in 2001. They have expanded their operations around the world. In Europe ,the United states and Asia. Today they have grow to 359 stones in their network of UNIQLO stores outside of Japan through February 2013. Sales from these stores account for 21.3% of UNIQLO sales. They are going to open stores globally to bring UNIQLO products to an even greater number of people. PROMOTION UNIQLO is fast becoming a brand of great international repute. In the past few years, they have successfully opened their stores in many countries. To mark the brand's 10th anniversary, in 2012, they offered over 1000 different colored designs, along with reprints of their most popular designs from their extensive 10 year archive. UNIQLO also promotes its brand through many social initiatives, which the company takes up very actively. Any UNIQLO item of clothing at stores that the customers no longer need are donated as clothing aid or recycled (to generate energy). At the end of October 2012, UNIQLO managed to collect a total of 18.4 million items. All the garments were in good condition and were delivered to refugee camps in Ethiopia and cyclone affected areas in Myanmar. Such kind of social initiatives have helped the brand earn a lot of goodwill in the market UNIQUE TECHNOLOGY UNIQLO is also famous for its HETTECH fiber, which was developed by the company in conjunction with international fiber manufacturer Today Industries. This new fiber changes water vapor emitted by the body into thermal energy. An air pocket,or layer of air , within the fabric acts to retain the heat insulating wearers against the cold. That's science that's good for the environment too! Worldwide UNIQLO sold 100 million HEATTECH items in fall/winter season of 2011. Aside from HETTECH, UNIQLO remains popular for its fleece garments. AIRISM is a new concept in functional inner wear created by UNIQLO for the spring and summer seasons. Sarafine Inner wear absorbs moisture, dries fast and deodorized for the man who prizes his crisp, flesh look,both so amazingly soft on the skin that you hardly feel you are wearing anything at all. UNIQLO always strives to research, discover, invent and produce new fabrics and create clothing of highest quality and optimum comfort.
  • 103. 102 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE UNIQLO BUSINESS MODEL UNIQLO was the first company in japan to establish an SPA(Speciality store retailer of private label Apparel) model encompassing all stages of the business from design and production to final sale. By continuously refining its SPA model, UNIQLO successfully differentiates itself from other companies by developing unique products. We quickly make adjustment to production to reflect the latest sales trends and to minimize tore operation cost such as personnel expenses and rent. This is how UNIQLO provide such high-quality clothing at such reasonable price.
  • 104. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/103 Source :Fast retailing HIGH PRICE HIGH QUALITY LOW QUALITY LOW PRICE BRAND POSITION
  • 105. 104 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE Zara recorded 56% sale growth an annual sale turn- over of Rs. 405 Billion through Nine existing store in India (2012-13) EUROPE FASTEST GROWING APPAREL RETAILER CASE STUDY 2
  • 106. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/105 Zara stores are company-owned, except where local legislation forbids foreigner-owned busi- nesses; In those cases, Zara franchises the stores. There are a total of 1763 Zara stores and 171 Kiddy’s Class stores worldwide. HISTORY 1975 19921980 1994 2010 1989 1990 Zara is a Spanish clothing and accessories retailer based in Arteixo, Galicia. Entered into Maxico.The company started its inter- national expansion through Porto, Portugal. Entered into Greece, Belgium and Sweden Inditex signs a joint venture with Trent the Tata Group to open stores in India at beginning . Entered into United States. Entered into France. Source : Forbes
  • 107. 106 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE BRAND & CULTURE Zara is indeed the Coca-Cola of the fashion world. Starting sometime in the mid-Seventies in Spain, Inditex, the Euro 11 billion (revenue) company that owns Zara and some other labels, built a hugely successful business model of taking the latest catwalk designs and converting them into affordable high street fashion in a matter of three weeks. Zara focusses on rapid product development and design and out sources the manufacture in small batch sizes to a network of dedicated suppliers. Its ability to bring changing fashion quickly to market has meant that while customers in Europe visit other fashion stores just three times a year, they visit Zara 17 times, according to one study. Zara’s track record on globalization has been enviable. Its flexible, high-speed business model has travelled from Spain to 77 markets around the world, including China. It entered mainland China in 2006 and has close to 44 stores there. PabloIsla, the 46th chief executive of Inditex, is now betting big on India. In earlier media interactions, he has also made it known that it may well be among its most challenging market entries yet Zara’s global model will be tested in India on three counts. One, there aren’t too many seasonal variations. In most parts of the country, winter is non-existent or at best lasts barely a couple of months. So driving new fashions every season isn’t easy. Two, there is the cultural issue: Although the new mall culture is inducing buying habits to change, Indians still don’t change their wardrobe that quickly. And it is Zara’s ability to get customers to visit and buy several times a year that enables it to achieve scale. Three, as a concept, Western women’s wear is still catching on. For most part, traditional Indian wear tends to dominate the wardrobe. And there is a strong preference for bright colors as opposed to the limited color palette — black, white and browns — in the West. So far, Zara has cranked out all its designs from a hub near Madrid and airlifted the finished product to its stores around the world twice a week. The added costs have been defrayed by charging a higher price in each of these foreign markets. In India, most foreign retailers have struggled to build a strong franchise based around import-led premium pricing strategy. Oil stain” strategy : It means Zara opens its first few stores in a country to get an understanding of a market and then uses that knowledge as it expands into that market. “The most important thing for us to enter a new market is the existence of potential customers: People sensible to fashion phenomenon. And, in an operational sense, the availability of suitable locations,” says Inditex’s official spokesperson . ZARA IN INDIA The fact is that Zara has had an opening few foreign brands have had in India. Through the opening weekend, there were long queues outside its trial rooms as women jostled to try out clothes. Accord- ing to industry sources (Zara itself is famously reticent about sharing numbers), it had sales of close to Rs. 1.25 billion in the first weekend in Delhi and nearly the same in its Mumbai store. Delhi’s Select City Walk mall recorded 40 percent more footfalls than it usually does and Mumbai’s Palladium mall recorded close to 30 percent higher footfalls. Any mall owner will want Zara now for free because it has an ability to bring more people of a certain kind into the mall,” says Arjun Sharma, promoter of Delhi’s Select City walk mall “Their opening has been far beyond expectations,” says Govind Shrikhande, chief executive of department store chain, Shoppers Stop. He credits the brand with opening up the premium women’s wear market in an unexpected way. Source : Forbes
  • 108. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/107 Industry executives such as him pin Zara’s initial success to the fact that it faithfully brings its famously international brand appeal and experience without having the higher prices that foreign brands typically have in India on account of high duties. At more than 16,000 Sq. ft., the stores look and feel exactly as they do internationally. The merchandise is also the same as is available in international stores currently, except that these stores have more of its “Basic” and casual wear collections rather than the higher end “Collection” clothes and accessories. PROMOTION Zero advertising .Another noticeable thing about Zara that has left many marketing suits surprised is that the brand doesn't advertise at all. When quizzed, the company responded, "We do not advertise, as we believe that our product and our stores must speak themselves and satisfy customers' expectations. We don't envisage any kind of promotion and Zara doesn't work with celebrities in any country." So much so that the brand hasn't got even a specific marketing budget for Indian market. PRICE Industry sources say price points are mostly below its international competitors in India, including Mango, Guess, Esprit, and French Connection. They are also in line with Zara prices in other markets including Singapore, Dubai and some European markets. This has come as a surprise to customers because international brands have tended to price above Singapore and Dubai prices because Indian duties could add 30-40 percent on retail prices, while duties in these countries are much lower. Devangshu Dutta, managing director of Third Eyesight, a retail constancy based in the capital, reckons that Inditex may be taking a long-term view of the Indian market and relying on strategic pricing.
  • 109. 108 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE QUINTESSENTIAL INDIAN BRAND Source :Online article CASE STUDY 3
  • 110. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/109 1960 2001 1980 2004 2006 2009 1990 1999 John Bissel starts FabIndia as a whole sale export company. Has 6 stores in metro's. Added ready to wear garments to the retail offering. Food products range launched. 20 stores across the metros, and started expanding to Tier 2 and 3. Body care products range launched, FabIndia Sana. 85 retail stores across India. Marketing focus shifts from exports to local Indian retail. William Bissel takes over as MD, FabIndia. HISTORY
  • 111. 110 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE BRAND & CULTURE Fabindia was started with the intention of exporting Indian traditional products to the Western markets. Fabindia was an exports only company during the first three decades of its inception. It was felt by the promoters that there was a need gap not hitherto served within these Western markets which could be satisfied by the products available from India. Giving the fact that the India second largest population in the world and its middle class was growing fast. These moves say initially focussing on the export market has benefitted the company immensely . The company over the years has build up a sustainable market niche. PROMOTION Fabindia does not advertise. In fact, company believes in the word of mouth publicity to familiarise its products. Hence it saves a lot of money on otherwise costly advertisement expenditure. When Fabindia started off, marketing of its products was supported by big buyers like Habitat. Later on, When exports seemed to slow down, Fabindia started to build on the domestic market. Given the size of the domestic market and its appetite for ethnic products,the market for Fabindia products are sustainable. DESIGN AND APPEAL Though the products of Fabindia are manufacture by Indian craftsman, Fabindia does the ground work to alter the products to meet with the tastes and expectations of the urban consumer. Its design and quality teams interact with the weavers to enable them to produce authentic products that comply with rigorous quality requirement. Also, the product of FabIndia are eco-friendly , the dyes and colors used in the clothes are natural dyes, the skin care products are made from natural ingredients with almost no chemical content in them, while the furniture is always of natural wood. This kind of product portfolio attracts a large loyal client who are willing to pay extra to buy a product that they are comfortable with. Till date, a credible challenge is yet to emerge for FabInia and portfolio products. FAB INDIA PRODUCTS The major portion of Fabindia’s product range is textile based. Non- textile introductions to this range are Home Products (introduced in October 2000), Organic Food Products (introduced in July 2004) & Fabindia’s range of authen- tic Personal care products (introduced in March 2006). The textile-based product range includes ready-to-wear garments and accessories for men, women, teenagers and children; bed, bath, table and kitchen linen; floor coverings, upholstery fabric and cur- tains. Cotton, silk, wool, grass, linen and jute are the basic fibres used. The Home Products range carries fur- niture, lighting, stationery, tableware, cane baskets and a selection of hand- crafted utility items. Fabindia Organics carries several types of cereals, grains, pulses, spices, sugar, tea, coffee, honey, fruit preserves and herbs. Fabindia's range of authentic Personal care products includes soaps, shampoos, hair oils, pure oils, moisturizers, body scrubs, face packs, hair conditioners & special skin care products.
  • 112. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/111
  • 113. 112 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE
  • 114. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/113 BRAND INTRODUCTION
  • 115. 114 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE The brand has created 15 concept wool art installations, dubbed Lana Sutra (pic- tured), to represent the traditional and new values of Benetton, which include “uniqueness and authenticity” of the fashion range, “love of art” and the brand’s “interest in the web”. Benetton says the Lana Sutra reflects the definition of the word “Kamasutra”, meaning pleasure and “a thread that unites” and will use colours that represent the Fall/Winter 2011 collection. The installations will be on display in three concept stores in Istanbul, Milan and Munich and will be shown on Benetton Live Windows, the company’s digital shop window. The concept will be supported by Benetton’s, Facebook and Twitter page and mobile applications. The image overhaul has been led by Benet- ton’s chief merchandising and creative director You Nguyen, who joined the company from Levi Strauss in June to rede- sign the company’s brand identity, in-store architecture and clothing collections. United Colors of Benetton was a leading European fashion brand in the 1980s, led by edgy ad campaigns that played on race, gender and religious stereotypes. It has since lost its market leading position to brands such as Zara, Topshop, Gap and H&M. Alessandro Benetton, executive deputy chairman of the Benetton Group, says: “With this project, which has been con- ceived and developed in harmony with our new Fall/Winter 2011 collection, we are highlighting the uniqueness and global values associated with United Colors of Benetton: an all-encompassing brand whose fashion, unites, with a truthful voice, people, points of view and themes that touch the whole of humanity.” Source :Online article UNITED COLORS OF BENETTON
  • 116. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/115
  • 117. 116 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE Source :Online article ABERCROMBIE & FITCH
  • 118. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/117 HALF-NAKED, ALL SMILES: ABERCROMBIE & FITCH OPENS IN HONG KONG In celebration of the opening of its newest flagship store in Hong Kong, Abercrombie & Fitch has imported 110 of its finest male models to wreak havoc in the streets (and hopefully drive customers). The store, located in Central's Pedder Building, officially opens August 11. But the models, wearing red board shorts and not much else, arrived several days ago to tour the city, pose for pictures and build up buzz for the preceptor chain. They come from Abercrombie & Fitch stores from as far as the U.S., Italy, France, Germany, Denmark, Spain, Japan, Belgium, and Singapore, and are reportedly being put up at the posh W Hong Kong, accord- ing to HotelChatter. Male or female, everyone can admit to doing a double take after passing the front of an Abercrombie & Fitch store, though it's not always for the reason the company would like. Forget the stupid A&F-branded clothes that are nothing more than an international symbol for douche and forget the fact that they spray their nasty cologne out onto the streets; the double take is all about the abs on the men who stand sentry at the store entrances and now even Hong Kong has them. This month, HK gears up to welcome its very first Abercrombie as 110 A&F male models wander the city, manning promo events and otherwise just touristing around, posing for photos. They've all got to sleep somewhere, however. In a very thorough examina- tion of the abbés infestation, The Wander lister notes that "110 Models are staying in 60 Rooms for the next two weeks" at the West Hong Kong. That's a very nice vacation for guys who otherwise are com- manded to look pretty and preppy.
  • 119. 118 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE
  • 120. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/119 DESIGN DIRECTIONS
  • 121. 120 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE LOCAL LANGUAGE INTERPRETATION For name fascia, there needs to be a consistency in the design language for both English and the local language. The brand logo, typeface, colors, etc. Needs to be similar in both languages. This will ensure that people will relate to the brand even though they see different languages and the overall design language of the brand remains the same. Over time, people will learn to Identify with the brand because of this and help in making the brand popular overseas.
  • 122. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/121 CONCEPT EXPLORATION
  • 123. 122 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE GRID FOR STORE FRONT Four Important factors to be considered while designing for stores with different sizes, locations, etc. 1. Store entry point 2. Window display 3. Brand name (English and local) 4. Brand image The following images show a standard grid structure (for store front and sides) which can be followed for stores with different sizes and structures. This guideline will be useful while designing stores for different locations, that has varying space and other constraints.
  • 124. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/123 1 2 3 4 STORE ENTRY STORE ENTRY STORE ENTRY WINDOW DISPLAY WINDOW DISPLAY BRAND NAME BRAND IMAGE WINDOW DISPLAY WINDOW DISPLAY WINDOW DISPLAY BRAND NAME BRAND NAMECONCEPT EXPLORATION
  • 125. 124 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE MANNEQUINS DISPLAY Promotion of brand through unique arrangement of mannequins. When a brand is launching for the first time, it needs to create awareness among consumers. The arrangements shown are try to depict how the brand is different and unique from all others. In India, people are sometimes hesitant to enter global brand stores. To ease this, we can arrange the mannequins in public spaces to depict a more casual "brand-for-all" image of the brand. By using many number of mannequins, it will help in attracting people towards the display and creating more awareness about the brand.
  • 126. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/125 CONCEPT EXPLORATION
  • 127. 126 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE CONCEPT EXPLORATION
  • 128. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/127
  • 129. 128 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE ARCH Inspired by local retail shops, this kind of arrangement also aims to display maximum number of designs near the store entrance. By taking inspiration from local shops, where all garments are stacked and arranged in a way that consumers can view maximum products at a time; we can create the same kind of arrangement for global brands too. This will also be a unique and distinguishing feature for the brand, from other global brands, which tend to be more minimalist in their window displays. Global brands can follow the local stores without looking cluttered, by following a common design language. The structure is inspired by an 'arch' that is commonly seen in household entrances, during festive times. These cultural influences will help to create a good brand image among locals.
  • 130. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/129 CONCEPT EXPLORATION
  • 131. 130 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE CONCEPT SKETCHES
  • 132. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/131
  • 133. 132 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE
  • 134. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/133
  • 135. 134 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE
  • 136. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/135
  • 137. 136 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE LANGUAGE FRONT FACADE WINDOW DISPLAY SALE SEASON EVENT BRAND PROMOTION BRANDNAME TYPEFACE CELEBRATION LOGO COLOR CULTURE SOCIAL BRANDINTRODUCTION BRANDINFORMATION BRANDIMAGE RETAILPROPS SIGNAGE GUIDELINE
  • 138. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/137 FRAMEWORK A framework for global brands, who want to introduce their brand in the Indian market. LANGUAGE (SIGNAGE AND NAME FASCIA) Customized signage for the local language in which the brand's logo, typeface, colors, size etc remain consistent with the international logo and brand image. INTRODUCTION TO THE BRAND The brand should be introduced through front facade, window displays, events or exhibitions. INFORMATION Brand information through unique and innovative window displays. Window displays also convey information about what the brand is all about. It will also convey information regarding sales, seasons and special offers. The story or theme of the window display will help in attracting more customers to the stores. PROMOTION (LOCATION AND EVENTS) The brand can be promoted through different events like sale, discounts, special offers, etc.
  • 139. 138 / HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE CONCLUSION Most of the Indian retail market sectors are unorganized , unlike in the major metro cities like Mumbai, Delhi, Kolkatta & Bangalore. When a global brand wants to enter the Indian market, there are some difficulties faced like Infrastructure, Space & Cost, Language Differences & Culture, Localization, Technology Usage. The research done during the project helps to provide guideline for global brand to understand what happens in Bangalore apparel retail market. It also provides a comparison between the local and the global market. The case studies and observations helped in the better understanding of what factors should be considered while introducing the global brand in the local context. The global brand needs to understand the local demography of the area that has been chosen for the opening of a new store in order to have a clear view of the target group and drive better sales. The framework has also been provided in the end of the research. It lists the steps that will help the global brand to enter the local market by proving them with the information related to store format and brand promotion.
  • 140. HOW GLOBAL BRANDS INTERPRET IN INDIAN CONTEXT/ RAHUL KARANKAL / NID BANGALORE/139 BIBLIOGRAPHY Refrence INDIAN CLOTHING HISTORY: http://timerime.com/en/timeline/783223/ indian+clothing/ LUNGI: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lungi DHOTI: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dhoti SARI: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sari INDIAN RETAIL MARKET SECTOR : http://www.indiaretailing.com/ WHY CONSUMERS PICK GLOBAL BRANDS: designguide.metro.as/index. php/content/content/ ANYWHERE RETAILING : http://www.stylus.com/lxqcnb SMART CLOTHES HANGERS,JAPAN :www.stylus.com/ UNIQLO CASE STUDY: http://www.fastretailing.com/eng/ ZARA CASE STUDY: http://www.forbes.com/ PROMOTION UNITED COLORS OF BENETTON: http://www.marketingweek.co.uk/ benetton-unveils-kamasutra-themed-image-overhaul ABERCROMBIE & FITCH http://travel.cnn.com/hong-kong/shop/ abercrombie-340592