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Who Are Advisers
Who Are Advisers
Who Are Advisers
Who Are Advisers
Who Are Advisers
Who Are Advisers
Who Are Advisers
Who Are Advisers
Who Are Advisers
Who Are Advisers
Who Are Advisers
Who Are Advisers
Who Are Advisers
Who Are Advisers
Who Are Advisers
Who Are Advisers
Who Are Advisers
Who Are Advisers
Who Are Advisers
Who Are Advisers
Who Are Advisers
Who Are Advisers
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Who Are Advisers

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  • 1. Who are college media advisers? Data from 2001 CMA Survey by Executive Director Ron Spielberger & Past President Lillian Lodge Kopenhaver
  • 2. What do they advise? <ul><li>48% newspapers only </li></ul><ul><li>11% radio only </li></ul><ul><li>9% newspaper & magazine </li></ul><ul><li>4% yearbook </li></ul><ul><li>4% magazine </li></ul><ul><li>3% all media </li></ul><ul><li>3% radio & television </li></ul><ul><li>2% newspaper, yearbook & radio </li></ul><ul><li>2% newspaper & radio </li></ul>
  • 3. Do they have journalism experience? <ul><li>85% have had some professional media experience </li></ul><ul><li>25% 1 to 3 years journalism experience </li></ul><ul><li>45% 9 or more years </li></ul><ul><li>20% 18 or more years </li></ul><ul><li>10% 23 or more years </li></ul>
  • 4. How long have they been advising? <ul><li>33% have been advising 1 to 4 years </li></ul><ul><li>10% are first-year advisers </li></ul><ul><li>25% advising for 15 or more years </li></ul>
  • 5. How much education do they have? <ul><li>55% have master’s degrees </li></ul><ul><li>25% have doctoral degrees </li></ul>
  • 6. How big are their campuses? <ul><li>50% 7,500 students or fewer </li></ul><ul><li>25% 7,500-15,000 students </li></ul><ul><li>15% 15,000-25,000 students </li></ul><ul><li>10% more than 25,000 students </li></ul>
  • 7. What rank do they have? <ul><li>40% have faculty rank and staff title </li></ul><ul><li>Of that percentage… </li></ul><ul><li>26% instructors </li></ul><ul><li>25% assistant professors </li></ul><ul><li>23% associate professors </li></ul><ul><li>14% full professors </li></ul>
  • 8. What about tenure? <ul><li>45% of advisers are in positions that do not lead to tenure </li></ul><ul><li>Of the 55% in tenure-track positions, only 48% are actually tenured </li></ul>
  • 9. What are their teaching loads? <ul><li>30% have no direct teaching assignment </li></ul><ul><li>35% teach 12 semester hours </li></ul><ul><li>20% teach 15 semester hours </li></ul><ul><li>10% teach 24 semester hours </li></ul>
  • 10. Where are most advisers assigned? <ul><li>67% of advisers are assigned to an academic department </li></ul><ul><li>65% are assigned to departments: journalism/communication </li></ul><ul><li>20% are assigned to English departments </li></ul><ul><li>other areas include speech, business, social sciences </li></ul>
  • 11. Who do they report to? <ul><li>27% report to department chair </li></ul><ul><li>15% report to student affairs dean/vice president </li></ul><ul><li>17% report to academic affairs dean/vice president </li></ul><ul><li>15% report to student activities/student life director </li></ul><ul><li>14% report to student media/publications board or chair </li></ul>
  • 12. How many hours do they spend advising? <ul><li>20% spend 40 hours or more </li></ul><ul><li>25% spend 20 to 40 hours </li></ul><ul><li>30% spend 11 to 20 hours </li></ul><ul><li>25% spend 1 to 10 hours </li></ul>
  • 13. How are they compensated? <ul><li>57% receive a reduced teaching load as compensation </li></ul><ul><li>23% receive no release time or additional compensation </li></ul><ul><li>10% carry full load and are paid extra for advising </li></ul><ul><li>10% receive a reduced load and extra pay </li></ul>
  • 14. What about the papers they advise?
  • 15. Oversight of the student media originates where? <ul><li>38% of student media operations assigned to student affairs </li></ul><ul><li>38% of student media operations assigned to department of communications/journalism </li></ul><ul><li>10% of student media operations listed as independent </li></ul><ul><li>5% assigned to student government </li></ul><ul><li>3% assigned to art/humanities departments </li></ul><ul><li>3% assigned to public relations departments </li></ul>
  • 16. What type of papers do they advise? <ul><li>48% publish weekly </li></ul><ul><li>13% publish daily </li></ul><ul><li>15% publish bi-weekly (every other week) </li></ul><ul><li>12% publish semi-weekly (twice a week) </li></ul><ul><li>9% publish monthly </li></ul><ul><li>3% publish three times a week </li></ul><ul><li>85% of the dailies are at 4-year public schools </li></ul>
  • 17. What’s the format? <ul><li>65% are tabloids </li></ul><ul><li>Of the 35% broadsheets, 62% are at four-year schools </li></ul>
  • 18. How big are their papers? <ul><li>28% average 12 pages </li></ul><ul><li>23% average 8 pages </li></ul><ul><li>18% average 16 pages </li></ul><ul><li>12% average 24 pages </li></ul><ul><li>12% average 20 pages </li></ul><ul><ul><li>70% of 2-year schools average 8-12 pages </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>49% of 4-year schools average 8-12 pages </li></ul></ul>
  • 19. How big are their budgets? <ul><li>32% have budgets exceeding $100,000 </li></ul><ul><li>19% have budgets between $50,000 and $100,000 </li></ul><ul><li>36% have budgets between $10,000 and $50,000 </li></ul><ul><li>13% have budgets less than $10,000 </li></ul>
  • 20. How are their papers funded? <ul><li>85% receive some funding from advertising </li></ul><ul><li>47% receive at least half of funding from advertising </li></ul><ul><li>9% totally funded by advertising </li></ul><ul><li>57% receive some funding by student fees </li></ul><ul><li>31% receive half or more of funding by fees </li></ul><ul><li>29% receive some funding from general college funds </li></ul><ul><li>20% receive half or more from general college funds </li></ul><ul><li>24% receive some funding from subscriptions but it only accounts for 1 to 5 percent of their overall funding </li></ul>
  • 21. Are the student staffs paid? <ul><li>nearly two-thirds of all editors are paid positions </li></ul><ul><li>fewer than half of reporters are paid </li></ul><ul><ul><li>75% of dailies pay reporters </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>33% of weeklies pay reporters </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>25% of two-year schools pay reporters </li></ul></ul>
  • 22. How many offer course credit? <ul><li>25% offer course credit to editors </li></ul><ul><li>– more than 90% of that is at non-dailies </li></ul><ul><li>47% percent of two-year colleges offer course credit to staff </li></ul>

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