Cross-Cultural Communication• What can mean one thing in   • President George Bush  one country, can often         Senior ...
Different Meanings of the Same           Gesture              •   UK & USA = O.K.              •   Japan = Money          ...
Philippines• Do not finish the food on your plate.• Greet with a quick flash of the eyebrows—a  quick lifting of the eyebr...
Japan• Avoid sticking your chopsticks upright in a  bowl of rice as it is reserved for funerals.• Avoid sucking and biting...
China• Spitting in public after clearing ones throat  is quite common• Shaking legs while sitting, snapping fingers,  and ...
Spain• It is customary to let the woman offer her  handshake first.• Men and women/woman and women greet  with light kisse...
Brazil• Clicking the tongue and shaking the head  indicates disagreement or disapproval.• The inverted American “OK” sign ...
Egypt• Right hand is designated for eating and the  left for bodily hygiene.• Do not eat everything on your plate when  di...
England• Privacy is very important; do not stare.• Tipping at bars is rare.• Loud behavior (talking or shouting) in  publi...
Israel• Public display of affection between members of  the opposite sex is considered rude and  offensive.• Avoid greetin...
Mexico• Hands on hips is a sign of hostility or anger.• When demonstrating the height of  something, be aware that holding...
India• Grasping the ears signifies sincerity or  repentance.• Most all meetings generally begin with palms  pressed togeth...
France• Friends greet one another with kisses. The  number of kisses also varies depending on the  region of France.• Tapp...
Cultural Sensitivity & Etiquette
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Cultural Sensitivity & Etiquette

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Cultural Sensitivity & Etiquette

  1. 1. Cross-Cultural Communication• What can mean one thing in • President George Bush one country, can often Senior gave the “V-for- mean something different Victory” to demonstrators in another in Canberra, Australias• So when persuading or capital in January 1992. In communicating with Australia, holding up two people, always be aware of fingers to form a “V” is cultural customs that may equivalent to the middle- exist finger gesture in the United States. President Bush later apologized for his actions.
  2. 2. Different Meanings of the Same Gesture • UK & USA = O.K. • Japan = Money • Brazil = Insult • Russia = Zero
  3. 3. Philippines• Do not finish the food on your plate.• Greet with a quick flash of the eyebrows—a quick lifting of the eyebrows.• Avoid pointing or wagging a finger at people.• Loud voices, public drunkenness and rude behavior are inappropriate
  4. 4. Japan• Avoid sticking your chopsticks upright in a bowl of rice as it is reserved for funerals.• Avoid sucking and biting your chopsticks.• Putting your thumb in between your middle and index finger while making a fist is obscene.• Avoid eating and drinking while walking in public.
  5. 5. China• Spitting in public after clearing ones throat is quite common• Shaking legs while sitting, snapping fingers, and whistling are generally unacceptable behaviors for women.• Avoid sticking your chopsticks upright in a bowl of rice as it is reserved for funerals
  6. 6. Spain• It is customary to let the woman offer her handshake first.• Men and women/woman and women greet with light kisses on the cheeks• In social situations it is common to show up late but being on time for business situations is expected.• Table manners are extremely important. It is not usually polite to eat with the hands.
  7. 7. Brazil• Clicking the tongue and shaking the head indicates disagreement or disapproval.• The inverted American “OK” sign is an obscene gesture.• Wait to bring up the topics related to politics, poverty, religion, or the Rain Forest until trust has been established.
  8. 8. Egypt• Right hand is designated for eating and the left for bodily hygiene.• Do not eat everything on your plate when dining.• It is rude to show the sole of your shoe.• Pork is not consumed by most Muslims (90% of population) – so do not serve it when you are hosting Muslims.
  9. 9. England• Privacy is very important; do not stare.• Tipping at bars is rare.• Loud behavior (talking or shouting) in public is considered rude.• The victory sign with your palm facing in is considered vulgar.• Never cut in line.
  10. 10. Israel• Public display of affection between members of the opposite sex is considered rude and offensive.• Avoid greeting, giving or receiving objects or handling money or food with your left hand.• The thumb’s up sign rude/obscene gesture by many.• Throughout the country greetings are very important . It is expected that you should enquire after the other person’s health, studies/work, family, and so on.
  11. 11. Mexico• Hands on hips is a sign of hostility or anger.• When demonstrating the height of something, be aware that holding the palm face down is reserved for animals.• Making a V sign with your fingers is an obscene gesture.• Mexicans sometimes use a “psst-psst,” whistling or a kissing sound to catch another’s attention in public.
  12. 12. India• Grasping the ears signifies sincerity or repentance.• Most all meetings generally begin with palms pressed together at around chest level and saying, “Namaste”. People usually nod or bow slightly as well.• It is common to remove ones shoes at places of worship, when visiting peoples homes, and even in certain shops and businesses.
  13. 13. France• Friends greet one another with kisses. The number of kisses also varies depending on the region of France.• Tapping the side of your nose with your index finger usually means that one is clever/smart.• Light and quick handshake; women offer hand first.• Drinking is a normal part of the meal and the social scene ; most people do not drink to get wasted. Regarding smoking, it is generally seen as a fashionable thing to do in French

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