The Power of Sharing Linked Data - ELAG 2014 Workshop
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The Power of Sharing Linked Data - ELAG 2014 Workshop

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Presentation to set the scene and stimulate discussion in the Workshop "The Power of Sharing Linked Data" at ELAG 2014 - Bath University, UK June 10/11 2014

Presentation to set the scene and stimulate discussion in the Workshop "The Power of Sharing Linked Data" at ELAG 2014 - Bath University, UK June 10/11 2014

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  • Thank you very much for that generous introduction. <br /> <br /> Welcome, ladies and gentleman to this plenary session on the power of shared data. I’m pleased to be here in Cape Town with my colleague Richard Wallis to talk to you today about the changing landscape of exposing our valuable library collections to library users and the power of cooperation and shared data in solving some of the hardest problems of connecting library users to the resources they need….
  • We, at OCLC, start with the user and how they interact with the library <br /> <br /> And that recognizes how the library as a place has changed <br /> <br /> We want the user to be successful in the research process.  And we want library collection’s to be part of that success.  We know you want that too. <br /> <br /> You have responded to the user’s behavior by changing the library from a collections warehouse to a collaborative learning space. <br /> <br /> You have re-balanced the budgets to reflect the need to purchase electronic over print. – Especially in academic libraries. <br /> <br /> The balance in budgets have passed the tipping point where the majority of the budget are is spent on electronic material over print – not to say that print is not relevant, just that in budgetary terms it is taking the lion’s share. <br /> <br /> You have re-engineered the technical and public services departments to manage and process electronic collections.  But those collections are not always available to the user.  Where the users are…. <br />
  • The users are here. They are on the web search engines. They are often not in the library’s physical space, or they are doing research from any physical location that allows network access and Internet searching. <br /> <br /> We know that often the library may have, or provides access to the resource they need but.. <br /> <br /> We also know that they may not start their search in the library and That search process does not always provide a clear path from search to library collection. <br /> <br /> Often the library collections are not clearly visible through search engine results.
  • I thought we might start with a story. The story of Anita. <br /> She is an undergraduate university student who has a short term assignment to understand the cultural output of the second world war. Her instructor has made the job easy by asking her to focus on a single author and a work that has had significant cultural impact on one of the countries in Europe. But Anita has been busy with other activities and today she doesn’t have a lot of time for research. <br /> OCLC’s research shows that she will start with sources familiar to her—sources that have provided her positive results in the past. But will those results provide the highest quality resources to include in her essay? Will they include any resources provided by her library?
  • Again, OCLC’s research shows that users have many choices in the research process. In fact, recent research shows that searchers will return again and again to a small set of sources that have provided them with positive results in the past. The library may or may not be part of that set of sources.
  • Library’s core professional obligations to the user: <br /> <br /> Select… <br /> <br /> The first 4 are well understood – have established communities of practice – in control of the professional librarian <br /> <br /> Expose is the one that has radically changed - when we were dealing with physical things the path for the researcher to the library door was in the scope/control of the library … <br /> <br /> Now that the user is out on the web that influence/control is being lost – the user goes where they want to go…
  • So the problem that is often stated as being …. <br /> <br /> That’s not the real problem – that is just a fact
  • Looking back on how libraries have handled collections before… <br /> <br /> Scribe change was a rewrite – not flexible <br /> Card catalogs – enormous step forward – flexible, etc. but cost still high – then printed cards came along… <br /> 50 years ago mainframe supported printing – lead to cooperative creation of records that solved efficiencies of card printing <br /> Advent of networks meant use of machine readable card records to build OPACS <br /> Web – put web servers on front of that same ‘machine readable card’ based system <br /> We are now moving towards a wheb of data
  • Where the web of data becomes visible.
  • But, what if we started to think about the information in a different way.
  • We, at OCLC, with our major data ingest and processing techniques – Big Data tech <br /> Matching incoming data with what we have <br /> Identifying the entities and associating their role attributes <br /> Woks – not so far very visible in libraries – important on the web <br /> <br />
  • The web is starting to represent these entity in knowledge cards/graphs <br /> <br /> The search engines are now all on board – providing information on the entities <br /> <br /> How would this look if we the libraries did something similar with the information we have been curating <br /> <br /> So the idea of a knowledge card for libraries is a kind of fashion forward view of how libraries will need to market themselves. I’ll come back to this point a little later in the presentation.
  • <br /> ----- Meeting Notes (07/10/2013 09:39) ----- <br />
  • Aggregation description
  • Registration: Make sure library data is stored somewhere (WorldCat) that connects up. <br /> Aggregation: Gathering all library collections together at the network level so the whole becomes more attractive on the web. <br /> Entification: Describe our data in ways that extract what is most interesting to consumers and partners. <br /> Syndication: Make data available on the web by demonstrating value. <br />
  • Thanks Ted for that insight into our entities.. <br /> <br /> I’d like to now explore more what the web wants
  • Back to Anita and her project... <br /> Take a look at the device she is using - where does that start – Google <br /> As Ted mentioned, Its is easy to forget how much Google is used as THE route into the web. <br /> The search engines are not just a way to sites – they are becoming the de facto way to find things within a site. <br /> For example site analytics from the BnF show that 80% of hits on its detail pages come direct from external search engines <br /> Simply this means - if you want your resources to be discovered, the search engines need to know about them
  • As Ted pointed out Knowledge Cards are appearing everywhere <br /> These supplement search results with information (data) about things <br /> They are driven by data – linked data -this is different from the traditional approach of just listing pages that seem to mention the topic <br /> Note how Information in the knowledge graph links you directly to more information <br /> They refer to this as Tings not Strings in our terms the Things are our entities and our resources.
  • So how do we get our DATA into the Googles of the world? <br /> We need to tell them – in the way the are looking for it
  • Which is the approach we took when adding Linked Data capability into WorldCat
  • This is what it looks like… <br /> We have just visited 4 separate sites – just like the web we know – data distributed across the web, linking together
  • Remember Ted showing you this list of things the web wants… <br /> How does our WorldCat Linked Data developments satisfy these desires…. <br /> <br /> WorldCat URI – respected robust source <br />
  • Why did we choose Schema.org <br /> Successful general vocab – stress cooperation in creating it and W3C affiliation for enhancing it
  • Which is why Richard created another W3C group of bibliographic focused people to recommend extentions to schema. <br /> Now 80+ members <br /> Submitted 2 proposals, 1 of which has been adopted – more in the pipeline
  • Schema not only show in town <br /> Emphasize the web-ness of their mission
  • Are they in competition –no they complement each other <br /> Schema for general sharing with the web – BIBFRAME for detailed library focused data capture & exchange <br /> Linked Data lets you mix vocabs – expect in the future descriptions will contain both <br /> Let the consumer decide <br /> <br /> <br />
  • Back to Anita again…. <br /> Her search not only finds her the book she wants, but by following the links, she gets signposts to where she can get access to it
  • As Ted reminded us – all these developments are part of a continuum <br /> Using the technology of the day to best achieve our mission <br /> We are using today’s technology – to build a web of data..
  • The web of data, like any network, creates the most benefit the more sources that are part of it. <br /> If your library is not part of it, your users cannot be linked to your resources! <br /> We all need to participate
  • Bringing those resources <br /> – your resources – in the appropriate form <br /> – to our users wherever they (in this case Anita) are <br />
  • Thank you very much for that generous introduction. <br /> <br /> Welcome, ladies and gentleman to this plenary session on the power of shared data. I’m pleased to be here in Cape Town with my colleague Richard Wallis to talk to you today about the changing landscape of exposing our valuable library collections to library users and the power of cooperation and shared data in solving some of the hardest problems of connecting library users to the resources they need….

The Power of Sharing Linked Data - ELAG 2014 Workshop The Power of Sharing Linked Data - ELAG 2014 Workshop Presentation Transcript

  • The world’s libraries. Connected. ELAG 2014 – Bath, UK The Power of Sharing Linked Data: Giving the Web What it Wants Richard Wallis OCLC Technology Evangelist @rjw
  • The world’s libraries. Connected.
  • The world’s libraries. Connected.
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. ! ?
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. Today’s online information seekers have many choices
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. Today’s online information seekers have many choices • Select • Acquire • Describe • Preserve •Expose
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. The problem with access to library collections: People don’t start research in the library catalog? (No… that’s just a fact.) The real problem is that we don’t expose our collections very well on the web. Question: How to connect users to library collections on the web?
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. Scribe OPAC Card Catalog Web of Data Web Evolution of Metadata Management and Library Catalogs
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. What the Web wants What is required to join the web of data?
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. What the Web wants Some things the web wants: 1. Size 2. Familiar structures 3. A network of links 4. Entity identifiers
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. edition author location holding date of publication classification publisher title source ISBN author location holding classification publisher person place object concept organization work library data: stored as records title
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. authorperson place object concept organization work subjectitem availability library data stored as entities
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. person place object concept organization work library data stored as entities library knowledge graph A graph of relationships
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. Knowledge cards for libraries Günter Grass Born: 16 October 1927 Gdańsk, Poland German novelist, poet, playwright, illustrator, graphic artist, sculptor and recipient of the 1999 Nobel Prize in Literature. Works Subjects Quotes Find Günter Grass works at: Libraries near me | Online Retailers Germany | German literature | Historical fiction War stories | Black humor | Fantasy “Even bad books are books and therefore sacred.”— The Tin Drum Google Knowledge Graph
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. person place work concept organization object Günter Grass Historical Fiction this copy of “The Tin Drum” Germany library “Die Blechtrommel” library data stored as entities Field in a record vs. entity in knowledge graph expression “The Tin Drum”
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. Evolution of Metadata Management and Library Catalogs Scribe OPAC Card Catalog Web of Data Web person place object concept organization work Web of Data
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. person place object concept organization work library data stored as entities library knowledge graph Works FRBR : Work FRBR : Manifestation
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. Benefits for All Library Workflows The Data Strategy: WorldCat Works person place object organization work Cataloging Integration with the web Cascading updates More options Intuitive searching
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. What the Web wants We are already doing a lot of this… 1. Size 2. Familiar structures 3. A network of links 4. Entity identifiers schema.org VIAF = Aggregation = Linked Data = Referrals = Identifiers
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. 1. Size & Aggregation
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. 4. A Network of Links & Entity Identifiers
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. How does a library contribute to all of this? 1. Register 2. Aggregate Add your holdings to the network Manage identifiers: Authorities Institutions 3. Expose person place object concept organization workwork
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. ?!
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. What the Web wants…
  • The world’s libraries. Connected.
  • http://www.theeuropeanlibrary.org/tel4/newsitem/5350 “… more than 80 per cent of these visitors coming from search engines …”
  • The world’s libraries. Connected.
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. Tell them about our resources… …using their language and methods http://www.flickr.com/photos/boston_public_library/6220572487
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. WorldCat Linked Data Linked Data • 311+ million data resources • Schema.org • Embedded RDFa • Links to Dewey, LCSH, LCNAF, DOI, VIAF, FAST • ODC-BY license • June 2012 • Continuing development: • Vocabulary, Content-negotiation, More Links • Works …
  • The world’s libraries. Connected.
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. How we are sharing with the web What the web gets: • WorldCat 311M+ • Schema.org • VIAF, LCSH, Dewey, … • WorldCat persistent identifiers (URIs) Some things the web wants: 1. Size 2. Familiar structures 3. A network of links 4. Entity identifiers
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. Part of the Web of Data
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. Part of the Web of Data
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. Part of the Web of Data Worldcat.org/oclc/81453459 The Hidden Face of Eve http://viaf.org/viaf/84254254/ Nawal El Saadawi http://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q238514 Nawal El Saadawi http://isni-url.oclc.nl/isni/0000000120296695 Nawal El Saadawi author sameAs sameAs sameAs VIAF
  • The world’s libraries. Connected.
  • The world’s libraries. Connected.
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. BIBFRAME Bibliographic Framework as a Web of Data: It is the foundation for the future of bibliographic description that happens on, in, and as part of the web and the networked world we live in. http://www.bibframe.org
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. http://www.bibframe.org
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. ≈ Complementary ≈ bibliographic description as part of the web ? Conflict ? @Fascinatingpicshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/54136840@N00/4921290518/
  • The world’s libraries. Connected.
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. WorldCat Works Linked Data Works • 197+ million Work descriptions and URIs • Schema.org • RDF Data formats – RDF/XML, Turtle, Triples, JSON-LD • Links to WorldCat manifestations • Links to Dewey, LCSH, LCNAF, VIAF, FAST • Open Data license • Released April 2014
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. WorldCat Works Linked Data Single Manifestation Multiple Manifestations 197 Million Work Descriptions Linking to 311 Million Manifestations
  • The world’s libraries. Connected.
  • A Web of Data Hubs of Authority in Setting Context
  • The world’s libraries. Connected.
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. Scribe OPAC Card Catalog Web of Data Web Building a Web of Data
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. We all need to participate Building a Web of Data Linking to all and all their resources
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. Opportunity to connect users with our resources
  • The world’s libraries. Connected.
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. ELAG 2014 – Bath, UK The Power of Sharing Linked Data: Giving the Web What it Wants Richard Wallis OCLC Technology Evangelist @rjw
  • The world’s libraries. Connected. Amy Elliott Bert Cousins Bob Murphy Bob Schulz Brian Wingerter Brook Pauquette Bruce Washburn Daniel van Spanje Diane Vizine-Goetz Ed Macklin Gail Thornburg Gay Miller Georgii Viznyuk Hugh Jamieson Jason Ash Jean Godby Jeff Mixter Jeff Young Jenny Toves Jim Michalko Joanne Cantrell Jon Fausey Julie Gay Kanchitpol Ratanapan Kelly Womble Leonardo Simon Lisa Cox Lora Chappelear-Pearson Martin van Muyen Production Release of WorldCat Works April 2014Kudos to: Marty Loveless Mike Teets Paul Moss Rich Greene Rich Greene Richard Wallis Roy Tennant Scott Orr Shelley Hostetler Stephan Schindehette Steve Meyer Ted Fons Thom Hickey Tod Matola Xiaoming Liu