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Religion and the Tea Party in the 2010 Elections: An Analysis of the Third Biennial American Values Survey
 

Religion and the Tea Party in the 2010 Elections: An Analysis of the Third Biennial American Values Survey

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The American Values Survey (AVS) is a large, nationally representative public opinion survey of American attitudes on religion, values, and politics. The 2010 poll is the third biennial AVS, which is ...

The American Values Survey (AVS) is a large, nationally representative public opinion survey of American attitudes on religion, values, and politics. The 2010 poll is the third biennial AVS, which is conducted by PRRI every two years as the national election season is getting underway. Results of the 2010 American Values Survey are based on telephone interviews conducted by Public Religion Research Institute among a national random sample of 3,013 adults (age 18 and older) between September 1 and September 14, 2010. Slides presented at the Brookings Institution on 10/5/2010.

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  • Those who consider themselves part of the Tea Party movement are significantly more non-Hispanic white than the general population (80% vs. 69% of Americans overall). Trust in Fox News among those who identify with the Tea Party movement is significantly higher than among Republicans (48%) or those who identify with the Christian conservative movement (39%).
  • Nearly half (47%) of Americans who consider themselves part of the Tea Party movement also consider themselves part of the Christian conservative movement. Among the more than 8-in-10 (81%) who identify as Christian within the Tea Party movement, nearly 6-in-10 (57%) also consider themselves part of the Christian conservative movement.
  • Americans who identify with the Tea Party movement are largely Republican partisans. More than three-quarters say they identify with (48%) or lean towards (28%) the Republican Party. Conversely, nearly 1-in-4 Christian conservatives (23%) also consider themselves a part of the Tea Party movement.
  • More than 8-in-10 (83%) say they are voting for or leaning towards Republican candidates in their districts, and nearly three-quarters (74%) of this group report usually supporting Republican candidates.
  • Americans who identify with the Tea Party movement are mostly social conservatives, not libertarians on social issues. Nearly two-thirds (63%) say abortion should be illegal in all or most cases, and less than 1-in-5 (18%) support allowing gay and lesbian couples to marry.
  • Those who identify with the Tea Party movement are more likely than the general population to be white Christians (70% vs. 57% respectively) and less likely to be unaffiliated (15% vs. 19% respectively). This larger white Christian affiliation is almost entirely due to the outsized presence of white evangelical Protestants in the Tea Party movement (36% vs. 21% overall). The religious profile of those who identify with the Tea Party movement differs only modestly from the religious profile of the Republican Party. The Republican Party is also dominated by white Christians (82%) and contains the same proportion of white evangelical Christians (36%).
  • Generally, the religious profile of the Tea Party looks like the religious profile of the GOP.
  • Tea Party stands out on a few key political values having to do with society’s role in ensuring equal opportunity and about minorities and immigrants. Among XnC (largely in line with WE, slightly higher on minorities getting too much attention): 46% Not problem if some have more chances in life 48% minorities get too much government attention 59% immigrants are a burden on the country
  • Dems losing every major white Christian group, even white Catholics. GOP losing major minority Christian groups and unaffiliated.
  • In 2008, survey sponsored by Faith in Public Life.
  • HCR: including 51% of independent voters and 79% of Democratic voters. Nearly 6-in-10 (59%) Republican voters say they would be less likely to vote for a candidate who supported health care reform.

Religion and the Tea Party in the 2010 Elections: An Analysis of the Third Biennial American Values Survey Religion and the Tea Party in the 2010 Elections: An Analysis of the Third Biennial American Values Survey Presentation Transcript

  • RELIGION AND THE TEA PARTY IN THE 2010 ELECTION An Analysis of the Third Biennial American Values Survey
  • The Tea Party in Context
    • Confirming and Challenging Conventional Wisdom
    Religion and the Tea Party in the 2010 Election
  • Confirming Conventional Wisdom Religion and the Tea Party in the 2010 Election
  • Relative Sizes of the Tea Party and Christian Conservative Movements Religion and the Tea Party in the 2010 Election Conventional Wisdom: The Tea Party movement represents a large portion of the U.S. population, rivaling the size of previous conservative movements like the Christian Right.
  • Overlap between the Tea Party and Christian Conservative Movements Conventional Wisdom : The Tea Party movement is distinct from previous conservative movements like the Christian Right. Religion and the Tea Party in the 2010 Election
  • The Tea Party, Christian Conservatives, & Republican Identification Conventional Wisdom: The Tea Party movement is an independent political force, whose members are not beholden to either political party. Religion and the Tea Party in the 2010 Election
  • The Tea Party Movement and Partisanship Religion and the Tea Party in the 2010 Election
  • Tea Party Views on Social Issues Religion and the Tea Party in the 2010 Election Conventional Wisdom : The Tea Party movement is largely a political libertarian group that believes in maximum freedom for individuals.
  • A PROFILE OF THE TEA PARTY MOVEMENT
    • Religion & Political Values
    Religion and the Tea Party in the 2010 Election
  • Religious Affiliation of the Tea Party Religion and the Tea Party in the 2010 Election
  • Comparative Religious Profiles Religion and the Tea Party in the 2010 Election Among those who consider themselves party of: Tea Party Movement Republican Party Christian Conservative Movement Gen. Pop. Literal view of Bible 47 45 64 33 Attend Church Weekly 46 47 64 36 Religion most impt. thing 27 27 39 20
  • Political Values of the Tea Party Religion and the Tea Party in the 2010 Election
  • VOTE AND SELECTED ISSUES
    • The 2010 Electoral Context
    Religion and the Tea Party in the 2010 Election
  • The 2010 Vote Gap by Religion Religion and the Tea Party in the 2010 Election
  • Variation in Support for Same-sex Marriage by Religion Religion and the Tea Party in the 2010 Election
  • Shifting Views on Social Issues Religion and the Tea Party in the 2010 Election
  • Increasing Support for Same-sex Marriage 2006-2010 Religion and the Tea Party in the 2010 Election
  • Support for Immigration Reform, Environmental & Minimum Wage Policies Religion and the Tea Party in the 2010 Election
  • Two Closing Notable Findings
    • A majority (54%) of voters say they would be more likely to vote for a candidate who supported health care reform.
    • Nearly 6-in-10 (58%) Americans favor a policy that provides a future path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants who have been in the U.S. for several years. Three-quarters of Americans also say immigration reform policies should be decided at the national level.
    Religion and the Tea Party in the 2010 Election
  • RELIGION AND THE TEA PARTY IN THE 2010 ELECTIONS An Analysis of the 2010 American Values Survey
    • Report available at: htt p://www.publicreligion.org/research/
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