Religion and Same-Sex Marriage in California<br />A New Look at Attitudes and Values Two Years after Proposition 8<br />Pr...
Proposition 8 Vote and Support for Same-Sex marriage in California<br />Religion and Same-Sex Marriage in California<br />...
Looking Back:Evaluating Prop 8 and Earlier Views<br />Religion and Same-Sex Marriage in California<br />
Reconsidering Prop 8 Today<br />Religion and Same-Sex Marriage in California<br />
Religion and Same-Sex Marriage in California<br />
Effects of Reassurances about Religious Marriage<br />Religion and Same-Sex Marriage in California<br />
The Broader Context: Support on Gay & Lesbian Policy Issues<br />Religion and Same-Sex Marriage in California<br />
The Catholic-Protestant Divide among Latinos in California<br />Religion and Same-Sex Marriage in California<br />
Partisan Differences on LGBT Issues<br />Presentation Title<br />
Influence of Theology and ChurchesTrusted Sources of Information<br />Religion and Same-Sex Marriage in California<br />Da...
Theology & Support for Gay & Lesbian Issues<br />Religion and Same-Sex Marriage in California<br />
Hearing about Homosexuality in Church<br />Presentation Title<br />
Clergy Rhetoric on the issue of Homosexuality<br />Presentation Title<br />
Influence of Clergy Speech on Views about Same-sex Marriage<br />Presentation Title<br />
Trusted Voices on Homosexuality<br />Presentation Title<br />
Trust information & Opinions of Clergy<br />Religion and Same-Sex Marriage in California<br />
Religion and Same-Sex Marriage in California<br />A New Look at Attitudes and Values Two Years after Proposition 8<br />Re...
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Religion and Same-Sex Marriage in California: A New Look at Attitudes and Values Two Years after Proposition 8

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As the state of California awaits U.S. District Court Chief Judge Vaughn R. Walker’s decision on whether Proposition 8 violates the U.S. Constitution, a new survey released today by Public Religion Research Institute examines the role religion plays in structuring attitudes toward same-sex marriage and a range of other issues related to rights for gay and lesbian people.

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  • -There are strong partisan cleavages across gay and lesbian issues. What we found is not just sharp Republican-Democratic divisions, which we might expect but Republican-Independent divisions which were nearly as large.-For instance, nearly two-thirds of Democrats and 6-in-10 Independents favor allowing gay and lesbian couples to adopt children; a position that finds support among just 37% of Republicans. The Republican-Democrat gap on this issue is 28 points while the Republican Independent gap is 22 points.-On average there is a 7-point gap between Democrats and Independents and a 19-point gap between Republicans and Independents.
  • -Overall, Californians who have a literal interpretation of scripture—believe that the Bible is the literal word of God—are much less likely to support expanding rights for gay and lesbian people than those who believe the Bible was written by men.-However the gaps between those with a more traditional theological orientation and a more modernist orientation varies significantly by issue.-For instance, public policy issues--workplace discrimination protections for gay and lesbian people and favor allowing gay and lesbian people to serve openly in the military—finds a majority support among biblical literalists—although there is still a 30-point gap-On family issues, which included adoption rights and same-sex marriage
  • Nearly half (48%) of Californians who attend religious services at least once or twice a month report hearing their clergy talk about the issue of homosexuality at their place of worship. There is significant variation by religious tradition. -Latino and black Protestants are most likely to report hearing about homosexuality in church, followed by white evangelicalsProtestants are much more likely than Catholics to hear about homosexuality from their clergy.
  • -Not only did we ask respondents to tell us whether their clergy spoke about the issue of homosexuality we also asked what their clergy was saying about the issue, something that should be accepted, something that should be discouraged or whether they didn’t take a position on the issue.-Overall we find significant differences by religious tradition in the content of clergy speech.-For instance, although white Catholics are the least likely to report hearing about the issue of homosexuality from their clergy, what they are hearing is overwhelmingly negative. White Catholics are 6 times more likely to hear that homosexuality should be discourage than should be accepted.-White mainline Protestants are slightly more likely to hear positive messages (21%) about homosexuality than negative messages (19%) from their clergy. All other major religious groups hear overwhelmingly negative messages from their clergy.-White evangelical Protestants, black Protestants and Latino Protestants are all much more likely to hear negative messages from clergy.
  • -The messages that Californians hear about homosexuality at their place of worship are positively correlated to their views on same-sex marriage. -Among Californians who report hearing negative messages from their clergy, only 19% support same-sex marriage, and nearly half (46%) say there should be no legal recognition of gay couples’ relationships. -In striking contrast, among Californians who report hearing positive messages from their clergy, fully 6-in-10 (3 times as many) say gay and lesbian people should be allowed to marry, and less than 1-in-5 (18%) say there should be no legal recognition for same-sex relationships
  • -Of six distinct categories of people we asked about, Californians report that doctors and therapists and the parents of gay or lesbian children are the most trustworthy sources of information and opinions about homosexuality.-Clergy leaders fell somewhere in the middle with 3-in-1o reporting a lot of trust in them and nearly as many saying they do not trust their opinions on the issue of homosexuality at all.-Not surprisingly, there are some interesting variations by religious tradition.
  • -White evangelical Protestants, Latino Protestants, and black Protestants all ranked their own clergy leaders as the most trusted source of information about homosexuality. -In contrast less then one-third of white Catholics, white Mainline Protestants and Latino Catholics say they trust their own clergy a lot-Both white and Latino Catholics are more likely to trust the parents of gay or lesbian children than their own clergy as a source of information about homosexuality. -Clergy leaders from another denomination scored lowest among all religious groups
  • Religion and Same-Sex Marriage in California: A New Look at Attitudes and Values Two Years after Proposition 8

    1. 1. Religion and Same-Sex Marriage in California<br />A New Look at Attitudes and Values Two Years after Proposition 8<br />Press Conference Presentation (July 21, 2010)<br />Omni Hotel, Los Angeles, CA<br />
    2. 2. Proposition 8 Vote and Support for Same-Sex marriage in California<br />Religion and Same-Sex Marriage in California<br />Robert P. Jones<br />
    3. 3. Looking Back:Evaluating Prop 8 and Earlier Views<br />Religion and Same-Sex Marriage in California<br />
    4. 4. Reconsidering Prop 8 Today<br />Religion and Same-Sex Marriage in California<br />
    5. 5. Religion and Same-Sex Marriage in California<br />
    6. 6. Effects of Reassurances about Religious Marriage<br />Religion and Same-Sex Marriage in California<br />
    7. 7. The Broader Context: Support on Gay & Lesbian Policy Issues<br />Religion and Same-Sex Marriage in California<br />
    8. 8. The Catholic-Protestant Divide among Latinos in California<br />Religion and Same-Sex Marriage in California<br />
    9. 9. Partisan Differences on LGBT Issues<br />Presentation Title<br />
    10. 10. Influence of Theology and ChurchesTrusted Sources of Information<br />Religion and Same-Sex Marriage in California<br />Daniel Cox<br />
    11. 11. Theology & Support for Gay & Lesbian Issues<br />Religion and Same-Sex Marriage in California<br />
    12. 12. Hearing about Homosexuality in Church<br />Presentation Title<br />
    13. 13. Clergy Rhetoric on the issue of Homosexuality<br />Presentation Title<br />
    14. 14. Influence of Clergy Speech on Views about Same-sex Marriage<br />Presentation Title<br />
    15. 15. Trusted Voices on Homosexuality<br />Presentation Title<br />
    16. 16. Trust information & Opinions of Clergy<br />Religion and Same-Sex Marriage in California<br />
    17. 17. Religion and Same-Sex Marriage in California<br />A New Look at Attitudes and Values Two Years after Proposition 8<br />Report available at: http://www.publicreligion.org/research/<br />

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